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Tag: Antisemitism

Bradley Martin: Book Review: Baruch Cohen. No One Bears Witness for the Witness. A Memoir

As time goes on, the memory of the Holocaust seems to grow dimmer with every passing year. It would seem that with the numerous genocides that continue to this day, many people are reluctant to absorb the true meaning of the words: “never again.” Yet this book effectively encapsulates not only the horrors of the Holocaust, but the story of an extraordinary man who maintained his humanity against overwhelming odds.
In this way, Baruch Cohen’s memoir No One Bears Witness for the Witness
is truly a precious gift to readers. Following a preface by Dr. Frederick Krantz and an introduction by Dr. Joyce Rappaport, the memoir is divided into four parts. In Part I, Baruch describes his childhood growing up in Bucharest, Romania. Baruch grew up in a poor, but not deprived, household and we get to see a side of him as a young boy who loved animals
and going to movies. Baruch also describes his loving family and thriving Jewish life.
In 1937, Romania would change for the worse with the installment of racial laws and revocation of the citizenship of Romanian Jews. In January, 1941, Baruch describes the Holocaust as having come to his city. For three agonizing days, the Jewish community had to suffer what he called the Bucharest Kristallnacht. After the third day, Baruch went to a slaughterhouse to search for the whereabouts of his missing father.
Thankfully, Baruch’s father would later turn up safe on the outskirts of Bucharest. But not after Baruch witnessed what he would describe as the most shocking image of his life: corpses hanging from meat hooks with mocking signs attached, “advertising” what was sadistically described as “Jewish kosher meat.”
Part II details Baruch’s life as a forced laborer, abused and beaten by Romanian fascist soldiers. Baruch’s lower spine would break, which would later require surgery in Canada. Yet Baruch and his friends would continue secretly distributing flyers for Zionist organizations, calling for Jews to escape to Eretz Israel.
In December, 1943, Baruch would marry his wife Sonia in the midst of Jews being deported from neighboring Poland and Hungary to Nazi death camps in Transnistria. With the Communist takeover of Romania in 1944, Baruch and Sonia left for Israel with their daughter Malca. Though Baruch
was too old to enlist in the Israeli military, he did serve as a reservist in the Sinai War of 1956, where he learned how to use a gun for the first time—a source of great pride for him. The family would then move to Canada, at the behest of Sonia’s parents.
In Part III, Baruch details his life in Montreal, where he became CFO of a major corporation and did a Master’s in Judaic Studiesat McGill University. He served as Research Director of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research and worked with the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre. Baruch would speak to classes at McGill and Concordia University, and to high school students, on the Holocaust and what happened to the Jews of Transnistria, a region of Romania where hundreds of thousands had been slaughtered.
The fourth and final part of the memoir consists of a collection of poetry written by Baruch over the years. Despite all that has happened to him and his family, Baruch truly believes that initially all human beings are good and that we must learn about the inhumanity of so-called humanity in order to oppose it. Baruch’s poems are very heartfelt and express a deep love for Israel and the Jewish people. But one that stands out is his poem
in memory of his daughter Malca, who sadly passed away in the year 2000. In his poem titled For Malca with Love, Baruch expresses a profound love for his daughter that is deeply moving and provides a glimpse of his depth as a compassionate human being.
Is it true that no one bears witness for the witness? To this day, Romania struggles to confront a dark chapter of its history. Baruch Cohen’s exceptional life is that of a man who witnessed the worst of humanity, yet persevered, and continuously uplifted those around him. In a world that is intent on forgetting the Holocaust, it is our responsibility as readers to internalize Baruch’s lessons and follow his example, thus truly honoring all he, as a witness, has done for us.
(Bradley Martin is Deputy Editor for the Canadian Institute
for Jewish Research and Senior Fellow with the Haym Salomon Center)

SURGING ANTISEMITIC, FAR-RIGHT POLITICAL PARTY REVEALS THAT HUNGARIAN JEWS CONTINUE TO LIVE “IN THE EYE OF THE STORM”

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Rob Coles, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 – Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284; E-mail: rob@isranet.org

 

Hungary and the Jews: Jerusalem Post, Apr. 17, 2014— In yet another example of how nationalist sentiments and patriotism trump common sense, Hungarians went to the polls on April 6 and reelected Prime Minister Victor Orban and his ultra-conservative Fidesz party.

Hungary's Reactionary Lurch: Wall Street Journal, Apr. 8, 2014: Prime Minister Viktor Orban and his Fidesz party thumped a feckless opposition in Hungary's parliamentary election on Sunday, winning 133 of 199 seats, according to an official projection.

A Case of Selective Holocaust Memory: Dr. Mordechai Kedar, Arutz Sheva, Apr. 30, 2014—Beginning in May 1944, Hungary’s Jews were deported by train to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where they were killed upon arrival.

Hungarian Jews in the Eye of the Storm: Jerusalem Post, Apr. 17, 2014— On the morning of March 20, 1944, the latest copies of the Orthodox Jewish weekly Orthodox Zsido Ujsag were delivered and laid neatly on the shelves of the Jewish stores in Budapest.

 

On Topic Links

 

Hungary Won’t Change Design of Holocaust Memorial: Times of Israel, May 1, 2014

70 Years After Hungarian Holocaust, Historian Protests Planned Memorial: Alina Dain Sharon, JNS, Mar. 19, 2014

Hungarians March Against Anti-Semitism After Far-Right Poll Gains: Reuters, Apr. 27, 2014

‘Train of the Living’ to Memorialize 70th Anniversary of Deportation of Hungarian Jews: Daniel K. Eisenbud, Jerusalem Post, Apr. 23, 2014

 

HUNGARY AND THE JEWS

Jerusalem Post, Apr. 17, 2014

                                       

In yet another example of how nationalist sentiments and patriotism trump common sense, Hungarians went to the polls on April 6 and reelected Prime Minister Victor Orban and his ultra-conservative Fidesz party. One in five voters also backed Jobbik, a far-right party that sees itself as the ideological heir to the pro-Nazi Arrow Cross party that existed from 1935 to 1945. Investment bankers and economists said the election results would hurt Hungary’s economy. The Goldman Sachs investment bank said Orban’s reelection means “unpredictable” economic policies are likely to hinder growth. An analyst at MKB Bank Zrt., a unit of Bayerische Landesbank, told Bloomberg that “Fidesz won’t really have an incentive to change its economic policy after this victory. And unless it does, there won’t be much of a sustained gain in the Hungary currency or in government bonds.”

There is concern that with Jobbik grabbing votes from Fidesz from the Right, Orban will be tempted to take further anti-democratic, nationalistic steps. Limitations on political advertising in commercial media, conditioning recognition of religious groups on cooperation with the government, and curbing the Constitutional Court’s powers have already caused the Council of Europe, the body responsible for defending human rights in the EU, to warn Orban that Hungary’s democratic checks and balances are at risk. If not for its membership in the EU, Orban would have taken further anti-democratic steps. In 2012, European Commission President José Manuel Barroso launched “infringement proceedings” in a successful bid to torpedo legislation advanced by Orban that would have empowered him to replace judges appointed under previous leftist governments and appoint the head of the central bank. One of the more eerily totalitarian bills had proposed to give the central government control over protecting the confidentiality of Hungarian citizens’ data. The emboldened Orban might try to pass similar legislation again. And this time he might be less willing to heed the EU’s watchdogs.

Why would Hungarians support a party and a prime minister that legislate policies that hurt their weak economy and threaten their fragile democracy? It seems the crude populist messages of Fidesz and Jobbik – suspicion of the EU and foreign business interests, distaste for migrants and a pride in Hungarian separatism – strike a deep chord. Unsurprisingly, the declining situation of the Jewish community – at more than 100,000 one of the largest in Europe – is collateral damage of Hungary’s turn to the Right. Attacks on Jews in times of crisis have been a theme in Europe throughout history, and the situation in Hungary is no different. The latest controversy is over a series of public ceremonies and other events planned this year in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of Germany’s invasion of Hungary. Hungary’s fascist government played a prominent role in the annihilation of half a million Jews. This fact will be played down, however, if not erased.

One example is a memorial to be unveiled during the commemoration ceremonies depicting an eagle (Nazi Germany) attacking an angel (Hungary). The special plight of the Jews will be omitted from the memorial.
Hungary’s Jews are threatening to boycott the government- planned ceremonies. In parallel, the Central European University’s Open Society Archives…will hold alternative activities, such as the Yellow Star Houses Project, to increase awareness of Hungary’s complicity with Nazi Germany. These independent efforts should be applauded. Hungary’s election results, however, do not augur well for the country’s Jews. When countries such as Hungary take an anti-democratic, anti-liberal turn, inevitably it is the Jews who feel the heat first. But rarely are they the only ones to suffer. Victor Klemperer, the German-Jewish diarist whose writings predicted the Holocaust, noted long ago, “You know, we Jews are seismic people.” Jews’ vulnerability means they are often the first to register dangerous upheavals.

                                                                       

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HUNGARY'S REACTIONARY LURCH                                                

Wall Street Journal, Apr. 8, 2014

 

Prime Minister Viktor Orban and his Fidesz party thumped a feckless opposition in Hungary's parliamentary election on Sunday, winning 133 of 199 seats, according to an official projection. The opposition alliance, Unity, won 38 seats, while the far-right Jobbik party took 23. The results aren't surprising: Given a choice between Fidesz and a Hungarian left that brought the country to the brink of economic disaster while in power in the last decade, voters preferred Mr. Orban. This is despite Mr. Orban's recent show of an authoritarian streak that jars with his political roots in Hungary's anti-Communist movement.

 

Mr. Orban first served as premier from 1998 to 2002, but since voters returned him as PM in 2010 he has entrenched his party in power and advanced a heavy-handed nationalist agenda. He has nationalized some $14 billion in private pension funds, made repeated attempts to politicize Hungary's central bank, and passed a media law that allows a Fidesz-dominated government body to impose heavy fines for "imbalanced news coverage," among other things. Such measures played well to a nation that by 2010 was suffering from the highest rate of post-Communist dissatisfaction in the region: 72% of Hungarians, a Pew poll found, thought they were worse off in 2010 than under Communism. Mr. Orban has since been able to deliver a measure of fiscal stability: GDP grew by 1.1% in 2013, according to the European Commission, and inflation dropped to 1.7% last year, from 5.7% in 2012. Mr. Orban has kept personal and corporate taxes flat and low, and he's cut deficits to below 3% of GDP. But his party has also made it hard for foreigners to buy Hungarian farm land and forced banks to provide $1.4 billion in relief to struggling borrowers. Such moves, while popular at home, will make it hard for Hungary to attract the foreign investment it needs to grow.

 

More alarming are the electoral advances made by Jobbik, a far-right party with explicitly anti-Semitic and anti-Roma views. Marton Gyongyosi, a Jobbik parliamentarian who is vice chair of parliament's foreign-affairs committee, called on the government in 2012 to "tally up people of Jewish ancestry who live here, especially in the Hungarian Parliament and the Hungarian government, who, indeed, pose a national security risk to Hungary." Mr. Gyongyosi has praised Russia's annexation of the Crimea as "the triumph of a community's self-determination." Jobbik is estimated to have increased its share of the national vote this year to 20% from 16% in 2010. During the campaign Mr. Orban's Fidesz party tried to outflank Jobbik on the bigotry front. "In 1848 it was the Rothschilds and now it's the International Monetary Fund," a Fidesz lawmaker declared at a memorial last month celebrating Hungary's 1848 nationalist revolution. "Hungarian independence compromises the Rothschilds' interests." With a rising Russia on its doorstep and a still-stumbling economy, Hungary will not prosper by lurching back toward the ideologies that shaped its catastrophic 20th century.

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A CASE OF SELECTIVE HOLOCAUST MEMORY                           

Dr. Mordechai Kedar                                     

Arutz Sheva, Apr. 30, 2014

 

To mark the 70th anniversary of the mass deportation and murder of over 585,000 Hungarian Jews, the Israeli government decided to observe this dark chapter in Holocaust history by making it the focus of the official Holocaust Memorial Day 2014 commemoration. Beginning in May 1944, Hungary’s Jews were deported by train to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where they were killed upon arrival. Israeli President Shimon Peres described the destruction of Hungarian Jewry in bone-chilling detail in his speech at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem Sunday night.

 

A few days before Israelis honored the six million Jews killed by the Nazis and their willing collaborators, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas met with American Rabbi Marc Schneier, a well-known proponent of interfaith dialogue. It was during this get-together that Abbas declared, “The Shoah was the worst crime in human history.” The “Holocaust was a reflection of a racist ideology as expressed in ethnic cleansing, which the Palestinian people reject,” the PA president added. “Indeed, the Palestinian people, afflicted and oppressed, are the first to demand the end of racism against other nations.” Abbas subtly draws a parallel between the Nazi ‘Final Solution’ and today’s Israel. According to Israel’s presumptive peace partner, Israel is doing unto the Palestinians what the Nazis inflicted upon the Jews. Is that so? Is Israel herding Palestinians onto trains like animals? Is Israel shoving the Palestinian people into gas chambers? Is Israel burning Palestinian bodies in crematoria? Is Israel capturing Palestinians and confining them in forced labor camps? Yet, despite the fact there is zero similarity between what is happening now west of the Jordan River and the horrors experienced 70 years ago in Europe, Abu Mazen (Abbas) does not hesitate to implicitly equate Israel to Nazi Germany.

 

As disturbing as Abbas’s statements are, it’s what he does not say that is morally repugnant. Let’s not forget that the annihilation of Hungary’s Jews was aided by the founder of the Palestinian national liberation movement, the Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin al-Husseini. Having fled to Berlin in 1941, the Mufti got busy, actively assisting the Nazis by recruiting Bosnian Muslim soldiers into the Wafen-SS. It was these Mufti recruits who guarded the bridges across which passed the trains that carried over half a million Hungarian Jewish men, women and children to Auschwitz for extermination.The Muslim soldiers were tasked with thwarting partisan efforts to slow the killing machine by blowing up vital arteries such as bridges. The Mufti also helped establish the “Free Arab Legion” that operated as an adjunct to the Wehrmacht, the German army. The Nazis were most appreciative, paying al-Husseini a monthly salary that was twice the amount of a Reich Field Marshall’s. Al-Husseini’s activities on behalf of Nazi Germany are explored in a documentary titled “The Turban and the Swastika”.

 

At this point, allow me to relay a relevant personal experience. Several years ago I participated in a discussion about the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks conducted on an Arabic media outlet. The segment featured a spokesman from the Palestinian Authority. When I brought up the Mufti’s active involvement in the annihilation of Europe’s Jews, the PA representative claimed al-Husseini’s participation was justified, since now these Jews could “not come to Palestine.” I responded by asking, “What if they were planning on coming to America? Would they then also have deserved a death sentence?” He did not answer my question. Arab media never talk about the role of the Palestinian Mufti in the extermination of Hungary’s Jews. Yesterday, on the eve of Holocaust Memorial Day, I was interviewed in Arabic by the BBC about Abbas’s statement that the Holocaust was, “…the worst crime in human history.” During the interview, I criticized Abbas for not condemning the Palestinian Mufti’s complicity in that horrible crime. Though the interview was broadcast, the part about Haj Amin al-Husseini was cut. I would like to ask Rabbi Marc Schneier: After Mahmoud Abbas condemned the destruction of European Jewry, did you remind him about the role of the Palestinian Mufti in facilitating the Nazi death machine? Does President Abbas find these actions reprehensible? Apparently, selective memory is what’s required for an orthodox rabbi to conduct an interfaith dialogue with Israel’s enemies.

 

Israel’s government, especially during Holocaust Memorial Day, must remind the country’s citizens and neighbors what Palestinian leaders did to destroy us. However, there is a tendency to forget recent history. During his speech that opened the official Holocaust Memorial Day commemoration, Israeli President Shimon Peres dedicated several minutes to describing in gruesome detail the destruction of Hungarian Jewry that occurred 70 years ago. Evidently, the President of Israel ‘forgot’ to mention the involvement of the Palestinian Mufti in this crime against humanity.

 

Omitting the role of the Mufti from his nationally televised address was no accident: Peres believes that the Palestinians are partners in peace, so why remind them and us about the terrible crime committed by their leader against our people? Day and night for generations we have proclaimed that the Holocaust must never be forgotten, that its horrors and lessons will forever be emblazoned on the collective human conscience. But how can we continue to demand from the world that it continue to remember the Holocaust if the President of Israel “forgets” to note a significant aspect of the Shoah just because he doesn’t want to embarrass his friend, Mahmoud Abbas, by mentioning a Palestinian leader’s involvement in the extermination of Jews? It turns out that selective memory is not just employed by our enemies: the President of Israel’s Holocaust memories are also selective, shaped by a personal and political agenda.        

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HUNGARIAN JEWS IN THE EYE OF THE STORM                          

Jehuda Hartman                                                     

Jerusalem Post, Apr. 28, 2014

 

On the morning of March 20, 1944, the latest copies of the Orthodox Jewish weekly Orthodox Zsido Ujsag were delivered and laid neatly on the shelves of the Jewish stores in Budapest. That edition was devoted entirely to Passover, the Festival of Freedom, whose celebration was to begin in less than two weeks’ time. Its pages were full of ads for wine meeting the strictest standards of kashrut, and for other familiar products for Passover. There was nothing in the magazine’s routine appearance or in its comforting content that indicated that this would be the magazine’s final edition, or that a fateful event in the life of the Hungarian Jewish community had taken place the day before, on March 19, the day that Nazi Germany invaded Hungary.

It had become clear to the Nazis that Hungary was conducting secret negotiations to join with the Allied Forces and that they must be stopped. Up to that point, Germany had allowed Hungary, its ally, to manage its internal affairs as it saw fit. As a result, the situation of Hungary’s Jews, though difficult, was immeasurably better than that of Jews in the neighboring countries, who, in fact, regarded Hungary as a place of refuge. Although they suffered from social rejection, severe financial hardship and a range of restrictive, discriminatory laws, the Hungarian Jews were not exposed to physical danger. Their hope was to remain in this condition until the end of the war, which seemed imminent. The period of relative safety, however, for over 700,000 Hungarian Jews, came to an abrupt end on March 19. From that day on, their lives were at stake.

How was it possible, in 1944, in the geographical center of a Europe being consumed by flames, where millions of Jews had already been murdered, that such a large Jewish community could continue to live in tranquility? How could they ignore the threat of Hungarian anti-Semitism and the pressures of Nazi Germany? Did they really fail to understand that the seething cauldrons of war just over their borders could boil over and destroy them, their families, their community? Did they really believe “This can’t happen to me?” On the other hand, what political conditions allowed Hungary, an island isolated in the German ocean of influence, to remain unaffected by the storm raging in the area? A number of historic factors help explain this anomaly.

In the mid-19th century, a Hungarian renaissance movement was formed, with the goals of renewing the Hungarian language (which, until then, was spoken mainly by the peasant population), nurturing Hungarian culture and working toward strengthening the country’s political position. Its territory was quite large, and included ethnic minorities from Slovakia, Romania, Serbia, Croatia and Ukraine, among others. Slightly over half the population of greater Hungary consisted of ethnically non-Hungarian minorities. In order to enlarge the Hungarian portion of the country’s culture and to legitimize the claim for the Hungarian nation state, the renaissance movement encouraged the non-Hungarian minorities to join the Hungarian culture by Magyarization – adopting the Hungarian language and culture, and identifying with the national goals.

Most of the members of the minority groups who maintained cultural and linguistic connections with their brethren in neighboring countries rejected the offer of Magyarization, while the Jews, for the most part, adopted the absorption project with great enthusiasm. They saw Magyarization as the key to a series of financial and cultural opportunities of great value. As things developed, the majority of Jews identified as Hungarians, and as a result the Hungarians achieved a majority in their quest for Magyarization.

The Jews saw themselves as an integral part of Hungary, in all its aspects, except for their religion. Jacob Katz, the historian, wrote that Hungarian Jews “…did not see themselves as similar to the Jews of France or Germany, who were merely pasted on to a pre-existing body. The experience of being full partners in the creation of a new People deepened their identification with the new nation and built a Jewish community whose hallmark was its love for the Motherland. Szabolcsi, the dean of Jewish Hungarian journalism, in 1903 tried to convince Herzl that the Hungarian Jews would turn their backs on the idea of a Zionist, national movement. Moreover, he urged that such a movement could not thrive in Hungary, as ‘Our love for our Magyar Motherland is so true, and has soaked up so much of our blood, that even if we wanted not to love her, we couldn’t do so; just as a mother is incapable of not loving her child, even if that were her desire.’”

The winds of modernization which blew so mightily in Western Europe were late in arriving in Hungary. The country’s economy, until the First World War, had been mostly based on the outdated methods and structures of feudal agriculture. The ruling elite sought to carry out broad reforms in the economy and in society in order to bring the country up to the level of the developed nations of the West. Unfortunately, despite the forward-looking views of its elite, Hungary lacked sufficient skilled, motivated manpower to lead the country in the process of moving from a feudalistic to a modern society. It was just that combination of circumstances, at the turn of the 20th century, that made the Jews of Hungary a decisive element in fashioning the shape and nature of the country’s economy. At the beginning of the 19th century, nearly all of Hungary’s Jews lived in agricultural areas, while 100 years later, at the beginning of the 20th century, the greatest concentration of Hungary’s Jews was in the cities; especially in Budapest, the capital. Very quickly, these centers of urban life became the backbone of Hungary’s middle class. These accelerated changes in the nature of the economy opened unprecedented commercial opportunities for the country’s Jews.

Since Hungary did not as yet have a modern infrastructure, the Jewish-led enterprises were able to operate almost without competition. In a relatively short time, industry and commerce began to develop, as did agriculture and the modern banking systems for which the Jews supplied the critical, educated manpower. The percentage of Jews in the commercial life of the country, in medicine, law, the arts and academe grew rapidly toward the end of the 19th century, and Jews became dominant in a number of areas. “The Hungarian Jews became a decisive factor in molding the image of Hungarian society and culture… the role of Hungary’s Jews in developing their country was greater than the contribution of the Jews, as a group, to any other country in Europe,” wrote historian Katz. Hungary’s social anti-Semitism grew and deepened in reaction to the strengthening of the Jews’ status in the financial and cultural life of the country. Because the ruling circles and the aristocracy consistently gave them support, the Jews did not perceive anti-Semitism as an existential threat. Anti-Semitism failed to upset the co-existence between Jews and non-Jews which had prevailed in Hungary since the granting of Emancipation in 1867. Although, to a certain degree, Jews did experience social rejection, they were not discriminated against in the judicial system, as was later the case in the period between the two world wars.

Although the Jews’ successful integration into Hungary’s cultural and industrial realms was the primary reason for the hate directed against them, it was this very success which earned them the support of the country’s elite, who recognized the Jews’ significant contribution to the modernization of Hungary, and to the furthering of its national and cultural goals. The period between the Emancipation and outbreak of WWI was considered the Golden Age of Hungarian Jewry. Patterns of loyalty and patriotism and identification with the land and people of Hungary were firmly set, as if in concrete. The extraordinary economic success, the sense of partnership in building a People, and the consistent support of the country’s elite led the Jews to trust completely in the Hungarian establishment, the leadership and the people.

It should come as no surprise, then, to read the headline of the liberal Jewish newspaper at the outbreak of WWI, calling for the Jewish population to enlist in the Hungarian armed forces in order to defend “The Holy Land,” and even “to sacrifice one’s life for this “great and noble People.” In fact, many Jews did enlist, and over 10,000 were killed in battle. The outcome of the war, however, brought instability to the status of Hungarian Jewry. With the defeat of the Central Powers, the Austro-Hungarian monarchy was disbanded, and, according to the Trianon Peace Agreement of 1920, approximately two-thirds of Hungary’s territory and 60 percent of its population were distributed among Hungary’s neighbors. Postwar Hungary spoke one language, controlled much less land, and Jews became the only “others” in the eyes of the majority. There was no longer any need for the policy of Magyarization, and the Jews lost the advantage of their enthusiastic adoption of Magyarization since most other minority groups were now living in their own national states…
[To Read the Full Article Click the Following Link—Ed. ]

Hungary Won’t Change Design of Holocaust Memorial: Times of Israel, May 1, 2014—Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban told Jewish community leaders that he would build a controversial Nazi occupation monument despite their opposition.

70 Years After Hungarian Holocaust, Historian Protests Planned Memorial: Alina Dain Sharon, JNS, Mar. 19, 2014 — This year Hungary is commemorating the 70th anniversary of the deportation of more than 430,000 Hungarian Jews to concentration camps during the Holocaust.  

Hungarians March Against Anti-Semitism After Far-Right Poll Gains: Reuters, Apr. 27, 2014 —Tens of thousands of Hungarians joined a protest march on Sunday against anti-Semitism, three weeks after the far-right Jobbik party won nearly a quarter of votes cast in a national election.

‘Train of the Living’ to Memorialize 70th Anniversary of Deportation of Hungarian Jews: Daniel K. Eisenbud, Jerusalem Post, Apr. 23, 2014—To mark the 70th anniversary of the mass deportation and murder of over 585,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II, hundreds of highschool students from across the globe will travel by train from Budapest to Auschwitz, where they will join 10,000 other students to march to the Birkenau extermination camp.

 

 

                               

 

                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AS EUROPEAN “SICK MEN” FACE INCREASING DIVISION, ANTISEMITISM RISES, & APPREHENSIVE EUROPEAN JEWRY LOOKS TO FUTURE

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Rob Coles, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 – Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284; E-mail: rob@isranet.org

 

 

 Contents:         

Why Hollande’s France is the Sick Man of Europe: Konrad Yakabuski, Globe & Mail, Nov. 25, 2013— France is in a funk. François Hollande is the most unpopular president in the history of French polling. The country's economy is now considered "the sick man of Europe" and French voters still see the cure as worse than the disease.

France Fights Back Against German “Sick Man of Europe”: Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, Telegraph, Dec. 6, 2013 — The overriding strategic story in Europe today is the breakdown of Franco-German condominium.

Could Spreading European Anti-Semitism Drive Jews From Homelands?: Liam Hoare, Forward, Nov. 25, 2013 — As the gnashing of teeth about the fate of American Jewry in the wake of the Pew Research Center survey continues, a newer and far more troublesome study of European Jewry ought to keep the supposed problem of defining Jewishness by the food you eat and the jokes you tell in some sort of perspective.

An Israeli Umbrella Group For World Jewry: Sam Sokol, Jerusalem Post, Nov. 11, 2013 —  There are many competing organizations that position themselves as representing the Jews of Europe.

 

On Topic Links

 

Greece's Dismal Demographics: Nikos Konstandaras, New York Times, Dec. 9, 2013

Dutch FM: Europe Judges Israel by a Different Standard Than Other Middle East Countries : Herb Keinon, Jerusalem Post, Dec. 10, 2013

European Bias: Robert Horenstein, Jerusalem Post, Nov. 28, 2013

                                                                                     

 

 

WHY HOLLANDE’S FRANCE IS THE SICK MAN OF EUROPE

Konrad Yakabuski

Globe & Mail, Nov. 25, 2013

 

France is in a funk. François Hollande is the most unpopular president in the history of French polling. The country's economy is now considered "the sick man of Europe" and French voters still see the cure as worse than the disease. Any attempt to adjust, even minimally, France's statist economic model and cradle-to-grave social safety net is met with paralyzing howls of protest. The country is effectively ruled not from the Elysée (the presidential palace) or the National Assembly, but by opposition politicians on the far left and far right. Barely 18 months into his five-year term, Mr. Hollande is a canard boiteux (lame duck) whose party may get rid of him before voters get a chance to.

No wonder Mr. Hollande, a Socialist who lucked into the presidency in 2012 after voters had tired of Nicolas Sarkozy's hissy fits, prefers foreign to domestic affairs. He has distinguished himself and his country by taking courageous stands against the Syrian regime's use of chemical weapons (well before U.S. counterpart Barack Obama), urging allies not to be duped into relaxing sanctions against Iran and intervening militarily against Islamic terrorists in Mali. Unfortunately, such actions won't win Mr. Hollande many votes at home. Nor will it fix France's broken economy. Just as Spain, Ireland and other bailed-out euro-zone countries are stabilizing, Europe's second-largest economy risks derailing the continent's recovery. France's private sector contracted again in the third quarter and warnings about the country's economic decline have grown louder by the day.

 

France's credit rating just got downgraded again by Standard & Poor's. And while markets shrugged off the news, the rating agency's stiff rebuke of Mr. Hollande's economic policies has sparked an even more bitter debate than usual (by French standards) about the country's future. That debate intensified last week after the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development released a scathing report blasting France's stubborn refusal to get with the program: "Over several years, many European countries have accelerated the adoption and implementation of essential reforms. This adjustment has not happened in France."

 

Government spending now accounts for an astounding 56 per cent of France's gross domestic product, compared to a bit more than 40 per cent in Canada. So far, Mr. Hollande has sought to meet European Commission-mandated deficit targets by raising taxes – to the tune of €30-billion ($43-billion) in 2012 alone. Not only does he keep missing the deficit targets, he keeps putting off critical spending reforms. The result is a further deterioration of France's competitiveness and a tax revolt the likes of which the country has never seen. It started after Mr. Hollande imposed a 75-per-cent levy on income above €1-million. The country's top court declared the tax unconstitutional, so Mr. Hollande simply shifted the burden to employers. No matter, the wealthy are voting with their feet. In July, France's former ambassador to Iraq and Tunisia was arrested trying to smuggle €350,000 in cash out of the country. He is just one of a new breed of so-called "cash commuters" seeking to escape Mr. Hollande's confiscatory tax policies by any means possible.

 

Such evasion is rightly condemned by politicians on the left. But many, including Mr. Hollande's ex-wife, 2007 presidential candidate Ségolène Royale, have repudiated the President by siding with the farmers who forced Mr. Hollande to scrap implementation of a carbon tax on transport trucks. Protests spread across the country this month as merchants and restaurant owners joined the farmers to fight an increase in the value-added tax. The latter is meant to offset cuts in payroll taxes (now nearing a punishing 50 per cent) – cuts that almost everyone agrees are needed to get French firms hiring again. The country's unemployment rate stands above 11 per cent, and four out of every five jobs added in 2012 were temporary contracts. Mr. Hollande's economic policy is full of contradictions. (He appointed an anti-globalization crusader as his minister of industrial renewal.) And he is dogged by open dissension among members of cabinet jockeying to replace him on the Socialist ticket in 2017. The best hope lies in Interior Minister Manuel Valls, even though he is considered a populist heretic by the Socialist elite. Mr. Sarkozy, meanwhile, is considering a comeback – which suddenly doesn't sound so crazy.

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   FRANCE FIGHTS BACK AGAINST GERMAN “SICK MAN OF EUROPE”

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard

Telegraph, Dec, 6, 2013                                                                                                                                         

The overriding strategic story in Europe today is the breakdown of Franco-German condominium. The two great nations have together run the EU on a foundation of equality since the 1950s, always finding some way to bridge the chasm between North and South. It was stretched a little after France lost Algeria – a French Department, not a colony – and with it lost population parity. But that hardly mattered as long as Germany wished to tuck behind France, usually letting Paris take the lead. It was stretched a great deal further with the Reunification of Germany, driven home a few years later when a Brandeburg "Ossi" who spoke fluent Russian – but no French – became Chancellor.

 

The formalities go on. Angela Merkel and François Hollande still meet to celebrate the Élysée Treaty of 1963: "Convinced that the reconciliation of the German people and the French people, ending a centuries-old rivalry, constitutes a historic event which profoundly transforms the relations between the two peoples.

 

Recognising that a reinforcing of cooperation between the two countries constitutes an indispensable stage on the way to a united Europe, which is the aim of the two peoples … "

 

Yet it is a loveless marriage now. The two have been quarrelling over Libya, Mali, Syria, and much else besides. Nothing is quite as toxic as the fundamental clash over monetary union, and the deflationary bias of macroeconomic policy. Hollande campaigned on a growth ticket, pledging to end austerity overkill and to pull the eurozone out of depression. And yes, it is a depression. Output is still 3pc below the 2008 peak almost six years later, and industrial output is 12pc lower. As you can see from this Krugman chart, it is worse than the 1930s. Nor is there much evidence that this will change soon.

 

Instead, Hollande is subject to almost daily strictures from Germany on the need for reform. The language is polite – mostly – and much of the German critique is correct. France desperately needs reform. The encephalitic state is 55pc of GDP. The tax wedge is one of the highest in the world. But the French know that. The unsolicited advice is mixed up with a lot of ideology, Teutonic pedantry, and disguised self-interested. It is starting to grate on the nerves…

 

We now have some remarkable comments from Jacques Attali, former head of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and one of luminaries of the French cultural Left. In a series of interviews in the French media and now in the German magazine Focus, he has lashed out at Germany as the real "Sick Man of Europe", describing its low unemployment rate as a "joke", the by-product of paying low-skilled workers €5 an hour or less. "Germany is an ageing country with catastrophic schools and falling productivity, and most of its export products are being copied," he said. German firms are mostly also-rans in the cutting edge fields of biotech and information technology. Within a decade, China and others will have pirated much of their mid-tier engineering range. He goes on to say that the country faces a demographic disaster as the ratio of pensioners to workers goes through the roof. See this exchange in French. The national savings are inadequate, not that saving even more will do them any good under the current deformed structure. It will merely dig them deeper into the same hole. The banking system is largely Kaputt, and in worse shape than French banks (I don't agree on that).

 

Mr Attali says the Germans are deluding themselves if they think their austerity formula has in any way solved the eurozone crisis. He makes an explicit parallel between the social and political upheavals in France today with events in Germany in 1933. Again, I don't agree. Marine Le Pen is not remotely like the Nazis, and Hollande is not remotely like Chancellor Bruning. The key years were the deflation era of 1931 and 1932, not the reflation year of 1933 under Hjalmar Schacht. In any case, today's events feel much more like 1935 in France itself under Laval as the deflation decrees kept coming (to keep France on the fixed-exchange Gold Standard). But obviously he can't say that as a loyal French socialist.

 

My point is not that Jacques Attali is right or wrong. What interests me as an political anthropologist is that he is saying such things, and that they are no longer hushed up by the French media as violations of the Élysée Treaty spirit. We are watching the historic French nation come out of slumber and subservience at long last, as it was always bound to do once its (justifiable) Gallic pride was hurt and interests were deeply threatened. This is the new fact on the ground. My own view is that Germany has another five years or so of illusory hegemony in Europe before it all gives way to demographic fundamentals. The younger Entente of France and Britain will take the lead again, buttressed by the high fertility Nordic bloc.

 

This is why I regard the Brit-Brit internal debate over EU exit and the costs and benefits of withdrawal as stale, narrow, and ill-informed. The CBI's attempt to put a figure on it is laughable. The great EU fight over the locus of democracy, and whether or not the ancient nation states are or are not the proper foundation of European societies. A penny here or there is a squalid distraction. Even if it could be shown that the EU enhances British GDP – and it cannot be shown because there are too many political and economic variables – it would not make the slightest difference. The strategic landscape is changing before our eyes. The EU no longer exists in its old form. The contours seem frozen in the imagination of British Euro-sceptics and British europhiles (usually even more provincial). They are both arguing over 20th Century issues that no longer have any meaning. Sorry to offend everybody at once. Bad habit, to be sure.

 

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COULD SPREADING EUROPEAN

ANTI-SEMITISM DRIVE JEWS FROM HOMELANDS?                        Liam Hoare                                              

Forward, Nov. 25, 2013  

 

As the gnashing of teeth about the fate of American Jewry in the wake of the Pew Research Center survey continues, a newer and far more troublesome study of European Jewry ought to keep the supposed problem of defining Jewishness by the food you eat and the jokes you tell in some sort of perspective. Conducted by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, known as the FRA, “Discrimination and hate crime against Jews in E.U. Member States: experiences and perceptions of anti-Semitism” surveyed 5,847 individuals 16 years old and over who considered themselves Jewish, residing in Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The headline figures were frightening enough. Across Europe, 66% of Jewish people see anti-Semitism as a problem in their respective countries today — as high as 90% in Hungary and 85% in France. The perception, moreover, is that over the past five years, the level of anti-Semitism has increased, with 76% of respondents saying it had gone up a lot or a little.

 

Where this increase has taken place might be surprising. But first, some more numbers. Thirty-eight percent of Jews now avoid, all the time or frequently, wearing, carrying or displaying things that might help people identify them as Jews in public; 60% of Swedish Jews and 51% of French Jews act this way. Forty-eight percent of Jews in Hungary and 46% in France have considered emigrating because they do not feel safe living in those countries as Jews, with 90% of French Jews stating that the Arab-Israeli conflict affects their feelings of safety. Immediately discernible from the statistics, though, is that the number of people who fear becoming a victim of anti-Semitism is greater than those who have experienced it as verbal insults, harassment or a physical attack. While 21% have been the actual victim of an anti-Semitic incident in the past 12 months, 46% worry about the possibility of such an assault. There is also tremendous regional variation between fear and experience. In France, for example, an astonishing 70% fear becoming the victim of a hate crime. In the United Kingdom, however, the fear is not as heightened, with 28% of respondents worrying about becoming a victim of verbal assault, and 17% the victim of a physical assault — still high numbers, to be sure.

 

The reason for this disparity between perception and experience, however, is not groundless panic or hysteria; it comes because of new manifestations of anti-Semitism, principally dissemination via the Internet and new media. When asked where anti-Semitism against Jewish communities occurs, 75% of European Jews pointed toward anti-Semitism on the Internet above all else, followed by 59% for anti-Semitism in the media. Internet anti-Semitism today is considered a greater problem than the desecration of Jewish cemeteries, the vandalism of Jewish buildings or institutions, and expressions of hostility toward Jews on the street and in other public places. The perception is that the level of anti-Semitism on the Internet over the past five years has increased, as discussion forums and social networking sites are now the main places where European Jews are most likely to have seen or heard anti-Semitic comments. While 75% reported seeing or hearing anti-Semitic comments on the Internet in the past 12 months, 51% saw or heard them in a social situation, 47% among the general public and 42% at a political event.

 

And what exactly are they hearing? Forty-eight percent of respondents have seen or heard someone make the statement that Israelis behave “like Nazis” toward the Palestinians; 38% that Jews have too much power in the economy, politics and the media; 37% that Jews exploit Holocaust victimhood for their own purposes, and on and on. Small wonder, then, that European Jews fear that they, their friends or their families might become victims of an anti-Semitic attack, if all this is a regular part of European discourse. That the threat has gone online, as well, rather complicates the question of what is to be done. The FRA suggests that E.U. member states consider enhancing “the legal basis for the investigation and prosecution of hate crime and crime committed with anti-Semitic motives on the Internet.” In so doing, states should establish “specialized police units that monitor and investigate hate crime on the Internet and put in place measures to encourage users to report any anti-Semitic content they detect to the police.”

 

One problem, however, is that the FRA’s own survey also showed an entrenched disbelief in the ability of national police forces to deal with anti-Semitism. When it came to reporting anti-Semitic incidents, only 8% of respondents reported harassment to the police: 17% reported physical violence, and 22% cases of vandalism. When asked why they did not report the offense, 47% said that nothing would happen or change by reporting the incident. Thus, if anti-Semitism on the Internet is to be considered a hate crime equal to verbal or physical confrontation, there must be other avenues to reporting it. To that end, it would be a decent idea for E.U. member states to foster closer cooperation between police forces and Jewish community organizations.

 

The other issue, however, is the question of whether one can — or should — police the Internet at all. A case of anti-Semitic harassment or intimidation online is one thing, but to monitor the discourse is quite another. By way of example, 21% of European Jews report hearing or seeing the statement that the Holocaust is a myth or has been exaggerated in the past 12 months. In Belgium, France, Germany and Hungary, it is a crime to deny or minimize the Holocaust, but it is inherently impractical to police the Web for signs of it, never mind the question of one’s right to make a statement as abhorrent as that the Holocaust never even happened. The struggle against anti-Semitism in Europe is unwinnable to the extent that it is ineradicable. It is a virus for which there is no cure — it can only be contained. What makes the FRA survey disheartening in particular is the knowledge that the Internet has become for European Jews the main context for encountering anti-Semitism. It only makes the struggle that much harder.

 

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AN ISRAELI UMBRELLA GROUP FOR WORLD JEWRY                      Sam Sokol

Jerusalem Post, Nov. 11, 2013

 

There are many competing organizations that position themselves as representing the Jews of Europe. Between the European Jewish Congress (a subsidiary of the World Jewish Congress), the European Jewish Parliament, the European Jewish Association, the Euro-Asian Jewish Congress and all of the national umbrella groups such as the Board of Deputies of British Jews and France’s CRIF, sometimes it seems as if there are too many to keep straight. However, last September another group, based in Israel, was added to the list of organizations claiming to represent European Jewry in some capacity: the Jerusalem-based Israeli-Jewish Congress. IJC CEO Michel Gourary, a Belgian immigrant to Israel, sat down over coffee with The Jerusalem Post to explain why Diaspora Jewry needs another group to represent it, and what differentiates the IJC from its contemporaries.

 

Why do we need an IJC when we have all these competing groups? First of all, we are an Israeli-Jewish congress, based in Israel, consisting of Israelis. We are not competing with any European organization, not at all. Our role is to say that we have many Israelis who are concerned by the fate of the Jewish communities abroad, especially in Europe, because Europe is at the frontline of all the anti-Semitic attacks and all the delegitimization attacks against Israel. Basically, we came out and actualized the idea of the Israeli Forum, an initiative that I was part of about 15 years ago. The Israeli Forum, like the IJC, said very clearly that we would like to show that we have Israelis who are concerned about the Jewish communities abroad, because we are one people. [We are here] to reinforce and build a bridge between Israel and the Diaspora.

 

You mostly focus on Europe? For the moment yes, but in November we have a partnership with the General Assembly of the Jewish Federations of North America. We are a partner of the GA. Why? Because we say we are with all the Jews. Why especially Europe for the moment? Because Europe is the frontline of a lot of problems regarding anti-Semitism [such as the proposed] ban on circumcision and ritual slaughter, and delegitimization of Israel. You have approximately 700,000 Israelis who already have European citizenship, or who are entitled to get it, so we say this is the most natural link that we have [to European Jewry]. We are now in the 21st century. What we said 20 years ago about Zionism and about emigrants and dual citizenship has changed.

 

Do you know how many French citizens who are also Israeli citizens are voting in the French parliamentary elections? 70,000. Do you know how many Italian people voted for a representative of Italy? 11,000. You have at least two countries in Europe, France and Italy, that have deputies representing their citizens living in Israel. Imagine all the kinds of leverage you can have in the global world. One idea we are exploring now with MKs is that at some stage the Knesset can have two or three or four members representing Jews or Israelis living abroad. A few years ago, I asked the French ambassador what France was doing to combat the missile attacks on French citizens in the South. He said, ‘You made a mistake, they are Israelis.’ ‘Mr. Ambassador,’ I said, ‘you have 10,000 French citizens living in the South.’ He said, ‘Wow, you are right,’ and that changed everything…

 

What is the main challenge facing European Jewry? Is it the ritual- slaughter issue, anti-Semitism, attacks on Israel’s legitimacy or attempts to ban circumcision? It is all of these together, but something even more pernicious. If one country in Europe is banning shechita [ritual slaughter] it could cause a domino effect.

 

Freedom of religion in Europe is not equally and evenly implemented. In only 13 countries out of the 28 do you have legislation against the denial of the Holocaust. It’s incredible. In some countries you have certain parameters for the restitution of looted assets. In some countries you receive only a certain percentage, in some countries it’s only public assets, it some countries it’s only private assets – but there is no EU regulation of all that. Shechita is also the same. Poland can ban it, but you also have some calls to do it in Denmark and the same in Holland. It can be the domino effect.

 

What is your view of the future of European Jewry? The question has to be asked of the Jews there and their leaders. You have some leaders who say no, they don’t see any future there, like the head of the Jewish community in Rome. Some don’t say it openly, but when I meet them I think some of them believe there are dark clouds on the horizon. There are too many dark clouds on the heads of the Jews in Europe. Meaning? There are too many challenges and because of that, we have to strengthen relations with Israel.

 

                                                                                             Contents

On Topic

 

Greece's Dismal Demographics: Nikos Konstandaras, New York Times, Dec. 9, 2013 — The Greeks are in a struggle for survival. And the odds are piling up against us.

Dutch FM: Europe Judges Israel by a Different Standard Than Other Middle East Countries : Herb Keinon, Jerusalem Post, Dec. 10, 2013 — Europe judges Israel by a different standard than other countries in the region because it is seen as a “European country” that should be judged by European standards, Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans said Monday.

European Bias: Robert Horenstein, Jerusalem Post, Nov. 28, 2013— The EU consistently singles out Israeli policies for condemnation while totally ignoring more egregious Palestinian behavior.

 

 

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FIGHTING ANTISEMITISM IN EUROPE-WITH KNOWLEDGE ABOUT ISRAEL AND THE HOLOCAUST

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Rob Coles, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 – Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284; E-mail: rob@isranet.org

 

 

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In Hungary, Antisemitism Rises Again: Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, New York Times, Oct. 29, 2013 — My father, Aladar Szegedy-Maszak, a Hungarian diplomat, dined with Adolf Hitler three times. And then he went to the concentration camp at Dachau.

Teaching About the Holocaust as an Antidote to Rising Hate in Europe: Shimon Ohayon, Jerusalem Post, Oct. 9, 2013— A shadow many thought resigned to the dustbin of history is currently spreading over the European continent. Politicians, steeped in National Socialism, xenophobia and anti-Semitism, are taking seats in European parliaments across Europe.

Why Europe Needs Israel: Richard Mather, Arutz Sheva,  Nov. 1, 2013— Zeev Elkin, Israel's deputy foreign minister is worried that the chasm between the EU and Israel will continue to grow if there is no solution to the new EU criteria concerning Jewish settlements in Judea and Samaria. I think Elkin is worrying too much. Yes, Israel is heavily dependent on trading agreements with Europe, but it’s just as true to say that Europe is dependent on Israel.

 

On Topic Links

 

France: Antisemitism Now Mainstream: Guy Millière, Gatestone Institute, Oct. 30, 2013

The Righteous: Shula Kopf, The Jerusalem Report, Sept. 29, 2013

Soviet Defector Fled Russia to Start a New Life in Canada-Now He’s Helping to Restore an Old Jewish Cemetery in Siberia: Joe O’Connor, National Post, Oct. 29, 2013

Book Review: Wonder of Wonders: a Cultural History of Fiddler on the Roof: Alisa Solomon, Wall Street Journal, Oct. 29, 2013

 

IN HUNGARY, ANTISEMITISM RISES AGAIN

Marianne Szegedy-Maszak
New York Times,, Oct. 29, 2013

 

My father, Aladar Szegedy-Maszak, a Hungarian diplomat, dined with Adolf Hitler three times.

And then he went to the concentration camp at Dachau. As secretary to the Hungarian ambassador to Germany from 1932 to 1937, my father watched the rise of the Führer. He encountered him socially at a reception and two dinners — the first time on Feb. 10, 1933, at Hitler’s first speech as chancellor. He remembered how sweat poured from Hitler’s face, soaking his uniform. The speech left my father cold, but also deeply unsettled by the rhapsodic reactions of the audience. “This was my first personal experience that we were dealing with a quasi-religious mass movement,” he wrote, “or perhaps more accurately, a mass psychosis.”

 

My father knew how devastating Nazi rule would be for the Jews. Hungarian Jews came to his office in droves, imploring him for advice as to how they could help themselves as property was seized and small businesses destroyed. He met movie directors and actresses; small-business owners; a landlord who owned a block of houses in a workingmen’s neighborhood of Berlin who was told that if he didn’t leave, he would be charged with molesting women. There was nothing he could do.

 

The hardy perennial of anti-Semitism has made a dramatic comeback in Central Europe. Germany has recently reiterated its friendship with Israel, in response to recent anti-Jewish activity. Far-right political parties in France and Austria have gained force. In Hungary, a virulently anti-Semitic party, Jobbik, is now the third-largest in Parliament. One party official has called for a list of all Jewish legislators, to assess their loyalty — a move that even the right-wing government condemned. (Earlier this month, the government pledged, in the face of global criticism, to crack down on anti-Semitism.)

 

This all would have been troubling yet familiar to my father and other relatives of his generation. They came of age in a country that was a stew of anti-Semitism. After World War I, Communists ruled for more than four months, and since most of those in power were Jews, the link between Communism and Judaism was forged in many minds. For many Hungarians, to be anti-Communist meant being anti-Semitic. My father was not a convinced anti-Semite, but as a Hungarian Christian from a strong family tradition of support for the monarchy, he flirted with anti-Semitism as a young man — a fact he was ashamed of his entire life. The experiences in Berlin, he wrote, “extinguished the last, minimal remnants of anti-Semitism that I had had as a teenager during the counterrevolution.” His years in Berlin, and his two other encounters with Hitler, were antidotes to any vestiges of anti-Semitism he had once harbored.

 

At a diplomatic reception in September 1934 before the Nuremberg rally that Leni Riefenstahl famously memorialized in “Triumph of the Will,” my father could not reconcile the old-fashioned, modest, almost shy Hitler with the raving lunatic he had seen at rallies. The final time he met Hitler was June 7, 1942. The prime minister of Hungary was invited on an official visit to the Führer’s wartime headquarters in East Prussia and asked my father — now deputy head of the political division in the Foreign Ministry — to go with him. They ate in Hitler’s dining car and my father saw what he later referred to as “the Satanic nature of his character.”

 

Hungary was an ally of Germany, but an extremely unreliable one. Its officials refused to deport Jews to concentration camps. My father, known for his opposition to Nazism, had attempted to organize an effort to negotiate a separate peace with the Allies, an effort that failed and led to his arrest after the Germans invaded Hungary, on March 19, 1944. After a regime of Hungarian Nazis took over in October 1944, voices of moderation were jailed or killed. Some 440,000 Jews were deported. Members of the gendarmerie were enthusiastic participants in the process. Ultimately some 600,000 Hungarian Jews were murdered.

 

If anti-Communism represented one side of hatred for Jews, anticapitalism represented another. My mother’s family, the highly assimilated children and grandchildren of the Hungarian Jewish industrialist Manfred Weiss, fell into the latter category. My maternal grandfather was transported to the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria after the invasion of Hungary, but he was lucky. He and his family were granted safe passage to Portugal after making, in effect, a deal with Heinrich Himmler for freedom in exchange for their property. Before this deal was made, my maternal grandmother had disguised herself as a Hungarian peasant during the Nazi occupation. She met the wife of the anti-Semitic former prime minister (and Nazi collaborator) Bela Imredy, with whom my mother’s family had once socialized (albeit not with great closeness). My grandmother asked if there was anything Mrs. Imredy could do to save my grandfather. Mrs. Imredy replied that she couldn’t. And as they parted she turned and said, ominously and elliptically, “Now it’s our turn.”

 

My parents married at the end of 1945, after my father was liberated at the war’s end. He later became the Hungarian ambassador to the United States. He resigned in 1947, after the Communist takeover. He and my mother managed to remain in America. My father died in 1988, my mother in 2002. I wonder what they would make of Hungary today. The same stereotypes of the past — the association of Jews with Communism and capitalism — fuel the support for Jobbik today.

 

Into this caldron has stepped the great conductor Ivan Fischer, himself a Hungarian Jew. He recently composed and performed an opera entitled Red Heifer that chronicles the story of a small group of Jews in the 19th century who were wrongly accused of the murder of a Hungarian girl from the countryside. It is a true story, one that uses the distant past to illuminate a dark time in the present.

Of course it is unlikely to change any minds. But the simple fact of it is an affirmation of the power of art to accomplish what decent politicians cannot. It is also an example the terrible persistence of a state of mind, a kind of psychopathy that did not begin with Hitler and, tragically, did not end with him.

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TEACHING ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST AS AN

ANTIDOTE TO RISING HATE IN EUROPE

Shimon Ohayon

Jerusalem Post, Oct. 9, 2013

 

A shadow many thought resigned to the dustbin of history is currently spreading over the European continent. Politicians, steeped in National Socialism, xenophobia and anti-Semitism, are taking seats in European parliaments across Europe. Parties like the Golden Dawn in Greece, Svoboda in Ukraine and Jobbik in Hungary have gained significant political representation in their respective parliaments and portals of power. They are also parties steeped in hate and violence. Among their recent activities are calling for lists of Jews to be drawn up, holding intimidating midnight torch rallies, beating up minorities and allegedly even murdering dissenters. While these actions may be undertaken by a few, the party platforms of the neo-Nazi parties are attempting to offer hope to a Europe reeling from a massive economic depression.

 

As we well know from the past, this is another strong echo of the past; the Nazis were able to gain power in Germany because of dire economic circumstances. In some parts of Europe, unemployment among youth is over 50 percent, and these parties are specifically targeting the malcontents among their populations. As someone who has spent the whole of his professional life in education, I sincerely believe that the greatest shield against hate is knowledge. The more people, particularly the younger sectors of society, understand about the true consequences of Nazi ideology, the more likely they are to abhor it.

 

A short time ago, I had the pleasure of visiting the Balkan region. While I was in Macedonia I was particularly impressed with the attitude of the Macedonian government toward commemorating those Jews who perished in the Holocaust. I was particularly touched by the government initiative for schools to visit the Holocaust Memorial Center for the Jews of Macedonia in Skopje. Every year since its opening, thousands of Macedonian schoolchildren visit the center to learn about the Holocaust and particularly about the murder of thousands of Macedonian Jews at the Treblinka death camp. Speaking to my parliamentary colleagues in Macedonia and some of the participants on these visits, it is clear that these visits have a chilling yet vital effect.

 

While the Holocaust is a very well known subject in Israel, in parts of Europe the average schoolchild will not be familiar with even its most basic details. These visits put the children face to face with the consequences of hate and evil. They are taught to disavow hate, racism and xenophobia because of the information they absorb during these short trips. In 2006, three Scottish academics began studying whether educating high school students about the Holocaust has an impact on pupils’ citizenship values and attitudes, and particularly those values and attitudes relating to various minority or disadvantaged groups. The study found that there were positive dispositions ascertained toward minorities in the aftermath of the lessons on the Holocaust. In terms of comparing the core sample with their peers who had not had the opportunity to study the Holocaust, there is evidence that the core sample had stronger positive values, were more tolerant and more disposed to active citizenship by their understanding of individual responsibility with regard to racism. The authors of the study wrote to the Scottish authorities in their conclusions that the evidence “certainly suggests that learning about the Holocaust in primary school can have both an immediate and lasting impact on pupils’ values.”

 

There are many similar studies which demonstrate that learning about the Holocaust and visiting Holocaust memorials or even concentration camps has a positive effect on the moral compass of individuals and can prove to be an important buttress to the steadily growing neo-Nazi propaganda. In 2000, the now renamed International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, an inter-governmental organization, signed the Declaration of the Stockholm International Forum on the Holocaust. The stated aims of the IHRA are to mobilize and coordinate political and social leaders’ support for Holocaust education, remembrance and research at national and international levels.

 

While the IHRA was originally created to fight ignorance and denial with regard to the Holocaust, the teaching of the Holocaust can have a much wider impact on European society. It can be an antidote against the hate that is on the rise in large parts of Europe. It can militate against the feelings of despair neo-Nazi groups are feeding off of. European countries should follow the Macedonian model of sending as many children as possible to Holocaust museums and concentrating resources on Holocaust education. As Jews, we applaud the study of this great tragedy that befell our people. However, European leaders should welcome and increase these initiatives for their own reasons, primarily to teach the values of tolerance and to stem the rise of the growing neo-Nazi phenomena. They are an vital investment in the European future.

 

As the essayist George Santayana famously said: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Europeans must remember this dark chapter of history because there are events taking place every day which are eerily reminiscent of the National Socialists’ amassing of political power leading up to the Holocaust. Europeans must be taught the past so they can stand in the way of these groups in ways that their ancestors did not, before it is too late.

Contents

WHY EUROPE NEEDS ISRAEL

Richard Mather

Arutz Sheva, Nov. 1, 2013

 

Zeev Elkin, Israel's deputy foreign minister is worried that the chasm between the EU and Israel will continue to grow if there is no solution to the new EU criteria concerning Jewish settlements in Judea and Samaria. I think Elkin is worrying too much. Yes, Israel is heavily dependent on trading agreements with Europe, but it’s just as true to say that Europe is dependent on Israel. Why? For the simple reason that Europe must become a dynamic knowledge economy if it is to compete with Asia and the US, and the best way to achieve this is for the EU to work closely with its neighbor and economic partner, Israel.

After all, when it comes to knowledge-based industries, Israel is one of the most competitive economies on the planet thanks to its remarkable capacity for innovation. Indeed, it is no secret that Israel is a world-leader in the hi-tech and start-up sectors. Israel’s remarkable laboratories and scientific institutes are the envy of the world and a magnet for international investment. Let’s look at the facts. Israel boasts around 4,000 technology start-ups, which is more than any other country outside the US. Not surprisingly, half of Israel's exports are of the hi-tech variety. Israel leads the world in patents for medical equipment and is a supplier of inexpensive but crucial medicines to Europe (such as Copaxone for multiple sclerosis and Actos for type 2 diabetes).  And it has attracted the most venture capital investment per capita in the world, 30 times more than Europe.

 

In the years and decades to come, Israeli engineers, computer scientists, inventors, chemists and biologists will drive not only Israel’s economy but will provide benefits to Europe and the world at large. The UK for example is quietly building solid trade links with Israel amid talk of a stronger partnership between British and Israeli companies in the areas of innovation, hi-tech and science. (The fact that a young and tiny country like Israel is well ahead of the UK in terms of research and development speaks volumes about the lackluster nature of British industry.) If Europe wants to compete with China and the US in the areas of medical technology, homeland security, communications and aviation, then it must cooperate with Israel and jettison its pointless obsession with Palestinian Arabism. On one level, the EU is well aware of this. This is why Israel was the first non-European country to be associated to the EU’s Research and Technical Development program. It is also why the EU wants Israel involved in the Horizon 2020 program. But there is a problem. In July the EU issued guidelines (due to come into effect next January) that say any agreement between the EU and Israel must include a clause in which Israel relinquishes its claim over East Jerusalem and Judea-Samaria. This is unacceptable to Israel and has jeopardized Israel’s involvement in Horizon 2020, the EU’s flagship initiative aimed at securing Europe's global competitiveness.

 

Antonio Tajani, the European Commission’s vice president for enterprise and industry, has pledged to strengthen industrial cooperation between the EU and Israel. Indeed, the whole point of his recent two-day mission to Israel was to procure Israel’s cooperation in the areas of space technology, communications and water technology. The implication is that without Israeli input, EU industry will lag behind the rest of the world. Tajani specifically wants Israel to sign the Horizon 2020 agreement because Europe needs Israel’s cooperation in the areas of job creation and scientific research. In other words, Israel’s involvement in the flagship scheme would not only benefit the Jewish state, it would boost prosperity in Europe. This is echoed by Elmar Brok, a German Christian Democrat politician and foreign policy adviser to Angela Merkel. He has publicly stated that Israel’s participation in Horizon 2020 is important to Europe. “I think it is a European interest. It would be stupid of us if we do not continue this cooperation,” he said, before adding: “Because it is very much to our advantage.”

 

The deadline to sign Horizon 2020 is the end of November, which is why the EU is trying desperately to reach a compromise solution in the coming weeks. Without Israel, Europe is less competitive. And in the aftermath of a global recession and a continuing Eurozone crisis, a return to economic competitiveness is vital for the well-being of Europe and the rest of the world. The EU leadership must be realistic and abandon the insane boycott of Judea and Samaria and concentrate instead on building solid relations with the world’s leading innovator, Israel.

 

                                                                                                Contents

France: Antisemitism Now Mainstream: Guy Millière, Gatestone Institute, Oct. 30, 2013— When a leading Jewish organization complained about "a dangerous trivialization of anti-Semitism," the President of the TV channel responded by saying that the Jewish community had "no sense of humor."

The Righteous: Shula Kopf, The Jerusalem Report, Sept. 29, 2013— It is 50 years since the State of Israel began to express the gratitude of the Jewish people to those rare individuals who saved Jews during the Holocaust.

Soviet Defector Fled Russia to Start a New Life in Canada-Now He’s Helping Restore an Old Jewish Cemetery in Siberia: Joe O’Connor, National Post, Oct. 5, 2013— Vladimir Rott is an engineer and, lately, an author, and if he were to add anything else to his career list a good fit might be high stakes poker player. Mr. Rott, see, has got guts. Nerve.

Book Review: Wonder of Wonders: a Cultural History of Fiddler on the Roof by Alisa Solomon: Shelly Salamensky, Wall Street Journal, Oct. 29, 2013— As he lay dying, my father made my mother pledge that the soundtrack from Fiddler on the Roof would be played at his funeral.

 

 

Visit CIJR’s Bi-Weekly Webzine: Israzine.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing is available by e-mail.
Please urge colleagues, friends, and family to visit our website for more information on our ISRANET series.
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CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing attempts to convey a wide variety of opinions on Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world for its readers’ educational and research purposes. Reprinted articles and documents express the opinions of their authors, and do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research.

 

 

Rob Coles, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish ResearchL'institut Canadien de recherches sur le Judaïsme, www.isranet.org

Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284 ; ber@isranet.org

ISRAEL, AN OASIS OF SANITY IN A DESERT OF MURDER & MAYHEM, STILL AN OBJECT OF LEFTIST VENOM – EU ANITSEMITISM FLOURISHES WHILE HIDDEN POLISH JEWS SURFACE TO DISCOVER LOST IDENTITY

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Ber Lazarus, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 – Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284; E-mail:  ber@isranet.org

 

 

 Download a pdf version of today's Daily Briefing.

 

Contents:

 

The Israeli Spring: Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, Aug. 29, 2013—Israel could be forgiven for having a siege mentality — given that at any moment, old frontline enemies Syria and Egypt might spill their violence over common borders. The Arab Spring has thrown Israel’s once-predictable adversaries into the chaotic state of a Sudan or Somalia.

 

On Foreign Shores, Anti-Semitism Still Rages: Barbara Kay, National Post, Aug. 28, 2013—It’s been many years since anti-Semitic motifs — like cartoons showing money-obsessed Jews lusting after power — have been part of mainstream culture here in North America. Yet in other parts of the world, such offensive notions are flourishing.

 

Questions for the European Left: Pilar Rahola, Portal of Ideas, Jan. 3, 2009—I am not Jewish. Ideologically I am left and by profession a journalist. Why am I not anti-Israeli like my colleagues? Because as a non-Jew I have the historical responsibility to fight against Jewish hatred and currently against the hatred for their historic homeland, Israel . To fight against anti-Semitism is not the duty of the Jews, it is the duty of the non-Jews.

 

Young, Hidden Polish Jews Discover Heritage in Israel: Rachel Avraham ,Jewish Press, Aug. 27, 2013— Shavei Israel, an Israeli organization dedicated to discovering hidden Jewish communities and lost Jews, recently brought 16 Polish Jews to Israel to rediscover their Jewish identity.

 

On Topic Links

 

Jews with Six Arms: Pilar Rahola, Jerusalem. Dec. 16, 2009—I accuse, then, in a formal manner: the main responsibility of the new antisemite’s hatred, disguised as anti-zionism, comes from those who should have to defend freedom, solidarity and progress. Far from it, they defend despots, forget their victims and remain silent before medieval ideologies which aim at the destruction of free societies. The treason of the left is an authentic treason against modernity.

 

Zionist Wine and Sour Grapes: David M. Weinberg, Israel Hayom, Aug 11, 2013— Catherine Ashton and her acrid European Union colleagues that are boycotting Israel are going to miss out on a lot of great Israeli wine. Perhaps it bothers the EU that there are Biblical echoes resonating in every glass…

 

Rediscovering the Real Bar Kokhba: Eli Kavon, Jerusalem Post, Aug. 25, 2013— Yigael Yadin, the prominent Israeli archeologist and statesman, made an extraordinary discovery in the Judean desert, near Ein Gedi, in 1961. Yadin and his excavation team found letters in a canyon crevice signed by Simon Bar Kosiba. The letters confirm that Bar Kosiba was the leader of an independent Jewish state that rebelled against the Roman Empire for three years, from 132 to 135 CE.

 

 

THE ISRAELI SPRING

Victor Davis Hanson

National Review, Aug. 29, 2013

 

Israel could be forgiven for having a siege mentality — given that at any moment, old frontline enemies Syria and Egypt might spill their violence over common borders. The Arab Spring has thrown Israel’s once-predictable adversaries into the chaotic state of a Sudan or Somalia. The old understandings between Jerusalem and the Assad and Mubarak kleptocracies seem in limbo.

 

Yet these tragic Arab revolutions swirling around Israel are paradoxically aiding it, both strategically and politically — well beyond just the erosion of conventional Arab military strength. In terms of realpolitik, anti-Israeli authoritarians are fighting to the death against anti-Israeli insurgents and terrorists. Each is doing more damage to the other than Israel ever could — and in an unprecedented, grotesque fashion. Who now is gassing Arab innocents? Shooting Arab civilians in the streets? Rounding up and executing Arab civilians? Blowing up Arab houses? Answer: either Arab dictators or radical Islamists.

 

The old nexus of radical Islamic terror of the last three decades is unraveling. With a wink and a nod, Arab dictatorships routinely subsidized Islamic terrorists to divert popular anger away from their own failures to the West or Israel. In the deal, terrorists got money and sanctuary. The Arab Street blamed others for their own government-inflicted miseries. And thieving authoritarians posed as Islam’s popular champions.

 

But now, terrorists have turned on their dictator sponsors. And even the most ardent Middle East conspiracy theorists are having troubling blaming the United States and Israel. Secretary of State John Kerry is still beating last century’s dead horse of a “comprehensive Middle East peace.” But does Kerry’s calcified diplomacy really assume that a peace agreement involving Israel would stop the ethnic cleansing of Egypt’s Coptic Christians? Does Israel have anything to do with Assad’s alleged gassing of his own people?

 

There are other losers as well. Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan wanted to turn a once-secular Turkish democracy into a neo-Ottoman Islamist sultanate, with grand dreams of eastern-Mediterranean hegemony. His selling point to former Ottoman Arab subjects was often a virulent anti-Semitism. Suddenly, Turkey became one of Israel’s worst enemies and the Obama administration’s best friends.

 

Yet if Erdogan has charmed President Obama, he has alienated almost everyone in the Middle East. Islamists such as former Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi felt that Erdogan was a fickle and opportunistic conniver. The Gulf monarchies believed that he was a troublemaker who wanted to supplant their influence. Neither the Europeans nor the Russians trust him. The result is that Erdogan’s loud anti-Israeli foreign policy is increasingly irrelevant.

 

The oil-rich sheikhdoms of the Persian Gulf once funded terrorists on the West Bank, but they are now fueling the secular military in Egypt. In Syria they are searching to find some third alternative to Assad’s Alawite regime and its al-Qaeda enemies. For the moment, oddly, the Middle East foreign policy of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the other oil monarchies dovetails with Israel’s: Predictable Sunni-Arab nationalism is preferable to one-vote, one-time Islamist radicals.

 

Israel no doubt prefers that the Arab world liberalize and embrace constitutional government. Yet the current bloodletting lends credence to Israel’s ancient complaints that it never had a constitutional or lawful partner in peace negotiations.

 

In Egypt, Hosni Mubarak’s corrupt dictatorship is gone. His radical Muslim Brotherhood successors were worse and are also gone. The military dictatorship that followed both is no more legitimate than either. In these cycles of revolution, the one common denominator is an absence of constitutional government.

 

In Syria, there never was a moderate middle. Take your pick between the murderous Shiite-backed Assad dictatorship or radical Sunni Islamists. In Libya, the choice degenerated to Moammar Qaddafi’s unhinged dictatorship or the tribal militias that overthrew it. Let us hope that one day westernized moderate democracy might prevail. But that moment seems a long way off.

 

What do the Egyptian military, the French in Mali, Americans at home, the Russians, the Gulf monarchies, persecuted Middle Eastern Christians, and the reformers of the Arab Spring all have in common? Like Israel, they are all fighting Islamic-inspired fanaticism. And most of them, like Israel, are opposed to the idea of a nuclear Iran.

 

In comparison with the ruined economies of the Arab Spring — tourism shattered, exports nonexistent, and billions of dollars in infrastructure lost through unending violence — Israel is an atoll of prosperity and stability. Factor in its recent huge gas and oil finds in the eastern Mediterranean, and it may soon become another Kuwait or Qatar, but with a real economy beyond its booming petroleum exports.

 

Israel had nothing to do with either the Arab Spring or its failure. The irony is that surviving embarrassed Arab regimes now share the same concerns with the Israelis. In short, the more violent and chaotic the Middle East becomes, the more secure and exceptional Israel appears.

 

Contents

ON FOREIGN SHORES, ANTI-SEMITISM STILL RAGES

Barbara Kay

National Post, Aug. 28, 2013

 

It’s been many years since anti-Semitic motifs — like cartoons showing money-obsessed Jews lusting after power — have been part of mainstream culture here in North America. Yet in other parts of the world, such offensive notions are flourishing. Extreme Judeophobia is widespread in the Middle East, where many Arabs imbibe it at home, school and mosque. All educated people know that. But many readers might be shocked at how acceptable openly expressed Jew-hatred has become among some people in the “civilized” countries of Britain, Europe and Scandinavia.

 

Since 9/11, many reliable polls have revealed rampant credulity in these nations around anti-Semitic myths, fraudulent reports and conspiracy theories. Often the culprits disseminating them are intellectuals and the media. According to the Simon Weisenthal Center, six out of 10 of the world’s most virulent anti-Semitic and anti-Israeli slurs are of European origin.

 

Anti-Semitism thrives in the far left and the far right. But the latter has no credibility with ordinary citizens. The far Left, however, finds respectable conduits for its anti-Semitism, sometimes thinly veiled as anti-Zionism, through academia, the media, NGOs, some Christian organizations such as the World Council of Churches, trade unions, “peace” activism, far-left Jewish academics and the UN. Some political centrists trustingly sip their toxic Kool-Aid, its poison dissolved in sugary compassion for Israel’s enemies, who are always, for the far left, the victims.

 

Evidence for these assertions can be found in the newly published book “Demonizing Israel and the Jews,” a useful compendium of interviews with scholars, politicians, journalists and artists from a wide variety of countries and professional domains, edited by the Israeli writer Manfred Gerstenfeld. Gerstenfeld, an expert on anti-Semitism attached to the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, focuses half of his interviews on the demonization of Israel, and half on the demonization of Jews. Highlight contributors to his volume include Canada’s Irwin Cotler on Iran; U.S. lieutenant colonel and psychiatrist Daphne Burdman on the indoctrination of hatred and incitement to violence in Palestinian children; Harvard Medical School psychiatrist Kenneth Levin on the “psychology of Jews who embrace their enemy”; and Norwegian academic Hanne Nabintu Herland, who has declared that Norway is “the most anti-Semitic country in the West.”

 

Ronald Evans, founder of the world’s first complaint bureau for combating Internet hatred, writes that Facebook’s European director told him they remove most postings on Holocaust denial, but not “the Holocaust denial which is not considered hatred.” Eissens says he expressed incredulity, for Holocaust denial is always evidence of hatred.

 

In terms of anti-Semitic incidents in Europe, the worst — such as the 2006 torture-murder of Ilan Halimi in France — tend to be perpetrated by first- or second-generation immigrants from developing countries. The influx of significant numbers of Judeophobes into European culture is a serious threat to Jewish communities, who rightly voice concern at their own government’s failure — France, Sweden, others — to adequately protect them.

 

The Netherlands, with its justifiably uncomfortable war memories, and its million Muslims, many overtly Judeophobic, is particularly tense for its 45,000 Jews. Frits Bolkestein, former Dutch defense minister, and professor at Leiden University, has said: “Jews have to realize that there is no future for them in the Netherlands and that they best advise their children to leave for the United States or Israel.”

 

Leon de Winter, a well-known Dutch writer, says what many Jews secretly think: “What is happening in the Netherlands and Europe is a prelude of terrible things to come. The great story of the love Jews have for Europe has come to an end. In this sense, the Nazis have been successful. The presence of Jews in Europe will end.” Anyone wishing to grasp the diversity and scope of the global cultural and ideological war being waged against Israel and Jews will find an excellent reference tool in this compact, enlightening anthology.

Contents

 

QUESTIONS FOR THE EUROPEAN LEFT

Pilar Rahola

Portal of Ideas, Jan. 3, 2009

 

Why don't we see demonstrations against Islamic dictatorships in London, Paris , Barcelona?  Or demonstrations against the Burmese dictatorship?
 
Why aren't there demonstrations against the enslavement of millions of women who live without any legal protection?
 
Why aren't there demonstrations against the use of children as human bombs where there is conflict with Islam?
 
Why has there been no leadership in support of the victims of Islamic dictatorship in Sudan?  Why is there never any outrage against the acts of terrorism committed against Israel?
 
Why is there no outcry by the European left against Islamic fanaticism?  Why don't they defend Israel's right to exist?
 
Why confuse support of the Palestinian cause with the defence of Palestinian terrorism?  And finally, the million dollar question: Why is the left in Europe and around the world obsessed with the two most solid democracies, the United States and Israel, and not with the worst dictatorships on the planet? The two most solid democracies, who have suffered the bloodiest attacks of terrorism, and the left doesn't care.
 
And then, to the concept of freedom. In every pro-Palestinian European forum I hear the left yelling with fervor: "We want freedom for the people!"
 
Not true. They are never concerned with freedom for the people of Syria or Yemen or Iran or Sudan, or other such nations. And they are never  preoccupied when Hamas destroys freedom for the Palestinians. They are only concerned with using the concept of Palestinian freedom as a weapon against Israeli freedom. The resulting consequence of these ideological pathologies is the manipulation of the press.
 
The international press does major damage when reporting on the question of the Israeli-Palestinian issue. On this topic they don't inform, they propagandize.
 
When reporting about Israel, the majority of journalists forget the reporter code of ethics. And so, any Israeli act of self-defense becomes a massacre, and any confrontation, genocide. So many stupid things have been written about Israel that there aren't any accusations left to level against her.
 
At the same time, this press never discusses Syrian and Iranian interference in propagating violence against Israel, the indoctrination of children, and the corruption of the Palestinians. And when reporting about victims, every Palestinian casualty is reported as tragedy and every Israeli victim is camouflaged, hidden or reported about with disdain.

And let me add on the topic of the Spanish left. Many are the examples that illustrate the anti-Americanism and anti-Israeli sentiments that define the Spanish left. For example, one of the leftist parties in Spain has just expelled one of its members for creating a pro-Israel website. I quote from the expulsion document: "Our friends are the people of Iran, Libya and Venezuela, oppressed by imperialism, and not a Nazi state like Israel."
 
In another example, the socialist mayor of Campozuelos changed Shoah Day, commemorating the victims of the Holocaust, with Palestinian Nabka Day, which mourns the establishment of the State of Israel, thus showing contempt for the six million European Jews murdered in the Holocaust.
 
Or in my native city of Barcelona, the city council decided to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the creation of the State of Israel, by having a week of solidarity with the Palestinian people. Thus, they invited Leila Khaled, a noted terrorist from the 70's and current leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a terrorist organization so described by the European Union, which promotes the use of bombs against Israel.
 
This politically correct way of thinking has even polluted the speeches of President Zapatero. His foreign policy falls within the lunatic left, and on issues of the Middle East, he is unequivocally pro-Arab. I can assure you that in private, Zapatero places on Israel the blame for the conflict in the Middle East , and the policies of Foreign Minister Moratinos reflect this. The fact that Zapatero chose to wear a kafiah in the midst of the Lebanon conflict is no coincidence; it's a symbol.
 
Spain has suffered the worst terrorist attack in Europe and it is in the crosshairs of every Islamic terrorist organization. As I wrote before, they kill us with cell phones hooked to satellites connected to the Middle Ages. And yet the Spanish left is the most anti-Israeli in the world. And then it says it is anti-Israeli because of solidarity. This is the madness I want to denounce in this conference.

 

Conclusion:

I am not Jewish. Ideologically I am left and by profession a journalist. Why am I not anti-Israeli like my colleagues? Because as a non-Jew I have the historical responsibility to fight against Jewish hatred and currently against the hatred for their historic homeland, Israel. To fight against anti-Semitism is not the duty of the Jews, it is the duty of the non-Jews.
 
As a journalist it is my duty to search for the truth beyond prejudice, lies and manipulations. The truth about Israel is not told. As a person from the left who loves progress, I am obligated to defend liberty, culture, civic education for children, coexistence and the laws that the Tablets of the Covenant made into universal principles, principles that Islamic fundamentalism systematically destroys. That is to say, that as a non-Jew, journalist and lefty, I have a triple moral duty with Israel, because if Israel is destroyed, liberty, modernity and culture will be destroyed too.  The struggle of Israel, even if the world doesn't want to accept it, is the struggle of the world.

Pilar Rahola is a Spanish-Catalan journalist, writer, and former politician and MP. Her areas of interest include women's rights, international human rights, and animal rights. In recent years she has spoken out about what she considers to be the hypocrisy of left wing politicians with regards to Israel and Zionist. In 2013 the Keren Kayemet planted a forest with 2,500 trees in her honor in Yatir, in the Negev.

 

Contents

 

 

YOUNG, HIDDEN POLISH JEWS DISCOVER HERITAGE IN ISRAEL

Rachel Avraham

Jewish Press, Aug. 27, 2013

 

Shavei Israel, an Israeli organization dedicated to discovering hidden Jewish communities and lost Jews, recently brought 16 Polish Jews to Israel to rediscover their Jewish identity. Michael Freund, chairman of Shavei Israel, explained, “In Poland, in most people’s eyes, to be Polish means Catholic. In Poland, the sense of identity is very much linked to religion, so when a person discovers he is Jewish or has Jewish ancestry, it comes as a shock to people. They become outsiders. It can be traumatic.”

During the Holocaust, 90 percent of Polish Jewry was murdered, decimating the 3 to 3.5 million Jews that lived in Poland on the eve of the Nazi invasion, leaving only 350,000 alive by war’s end. While most surviving Jews left Poland after a brief return to search for relatives, some remained. Due to communist rule and memories of the Holocaust, many hid their Jewish identity. Today, there are many communities with “hidden Jews,” who are disconnected from their Jewish roots and ancestry.

 

“There are people who suspect they might have Jewish roots and want to know yet don’t change their life styles. Others could return to Judaism or pursue a secular journey to learn about Jewish culture. We are talking about a human phenomenon, so different people react different,” Freund explained. “Some of them become religious Jews and do a conversion, while others are struggling with their new identity and are trying to figure out what to make of it and how it should impact their life. One thing that unites them is that they all want to learn more about their heritage and want to see the land of their ancestors.”

 

Some hidden Jews grew up as Catholic, the children of Jews who converted while hiding in Catholic orphanages. Others were raised without religion playing any role in their lives. According to Freund, “One young man [in this group of 16] who began to get interested in his family genealogy and then at the same time took a DNA test discovered that he has Jewish background. That combined with documents he found convinced him he has Jewish ancestry. He was even able to locate distant cousins in the US that are Jewish. This prompted him to study more about Judaism. He converted and became religiously observant.” Most of the 16 Jews in this group, however, are at an earlier stage in their journey.

 

“In many other cases, they have a grandparent who revealed it to them or are people who don’t know for sure, since their family will not discuss it with them,” said Freund. Their suspicion grew out of their lack or church attendance or extended family. “They have relatives who refuse [to speak about it] and that fuels their speculation even more.” Freund believes that roots are powerful. “When we walk the streets of Jerusalem, the trees are uneven and the roots have spread out and lifted the rocks up. If that is true of a tree, how much more so of a human being! Sometimes they burst upwards to show they are still there. More people through out Poland are discovering and embracing their Jewish roots. They are trying to go home.”

 

Contents

 

 

Jews with Six Arms: Pilar Rahola, Jerusalem. Dec. 16, 2009—I accuse, then, in a formal manner: the main responsibility of the new antisemite’s hatred, disguised as anti-zionism, comes from those who should have to defend freedom, solidarity and progress. Far from it, they defend despots, forget their victims and remain silent before medieval ideologies which aim at the destruction of free societies. The treason of the left is an authentic treason against modernity.

 

Zionist Wine and Sour Grapes: David M. Weinberg, Israel Hayom, Aug 11, 2013—Catherine Ashton and her acrid European Union colleagues that are boycotting Israel are going to miss out on a lot of great Israeli wine. Perhaps it bothers the EU that there are Biblical echoes resonating in every glass…

 

Rediscovering the Real Bar Kokhba: Eli Kavon, Jerusalem Post, Aug. 25, 2013—Yigael Yadin, the prominent Israeli archeologist and statesman, made an extraordinary discovery in the Judean desert, near Ein Gedi, in 1961. Yadin and his excavation team found letters in a canyon crevice signed by Simon Bar Kosiba. The letters confirm that Bar Kosiba was the leader of an independent Jewish state that rebelled against the Roman Empire for three years, from 132 to 135 CE.

 

 

Visit CIJR’s Bi-Weekly Webzine: Israzine.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing is available by e-mail.
Please urge colleagues, friends, and family to visit our website for more information on our ISRANET series.
To join our distribution list, or to unsubscribe, visit us at http://www.isranet.org/.

The ISRANET Daily Briefing is a service of CIJR. We hope that you find it useful and that you will support it and our pro-Israel educational work by forwarding a minimum $90.00 tax-deductible contribution [please send a cheque or VISA/MasterCard information to CIJR (see cover page for address)]. All donations include a membership-subscription to our respected quarterly ISRAFAX print magazine, which will be mailed to your home.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing attempts to convey a wide variety of opinions on Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world for its readers’ educational and research purposes. Reprinted articles and documents express the opinions of their authors, and do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research.

 

 

Ber Lazarus, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish ResearchL'institut Canadien de recherches sur le Judaïsme, www.isranet.org

Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284 ; ber@isranet.org

PENDANT QUE L’IMPASSE DE LA CRISE SYRIENNE PERDURE, L’ANTISÉMITISME EN FRANCE S’AMPLIFIE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impasse dans la crise syrienne

Jacques Neriah

Le CAPE de Jérusalem, 22 avril 2013

 

Après deux longues années de guerre nous constatons que les structures du régime sont toujours solides pour pouvoir maintenir un conflit armé permanent malgré le fait qu’une grande partie du pays est tombée dans les mains des rebelles. 

 

Certains observateurs rappellent que la guerre civile syrienne a débuté en réalité en 1980, lors de la prise d’assaut sanglante de l’école militaire d’Alep par un groupe des Frères musulmans. La réaction du président Hafez el Assad fut le massacre tristement célèbre de 20 000 membres de la confrérie musulmane installés à Homs et Hama.

 

Aujourd’hui, en dépit de la guerre d’usure, la coalition qui entoure Assad fils demeure assez forte pour pouvoir gouverner et assurer à sa population une vie quotidienne plus au moins “normale”. Précisons que toutes les informations sur la crise syrienne proviennent de différentes sources et ONG souvent opposées ; celle connue sous le nom d’« Observatoire syrien des droits de l’Homme » est devenue privilégiée bien qu’elle soit manipulée par les Frères musulmans.

 

Avec les combats qui ravagent le pays, les Etats-Unis et l’Europe se trouvent devant un énorme dilemme, une mission quasiment impossible : d’une part, ils souhaitent la chute rapide du président Assad mais d’un autre côté, ils s’opposent à l’installation d’un régime islamiste qui sera pire que celui qui a succédé à Moubarak en Egypte ou à Ben Ali en Tunisie.

 

Israël fait face au même dilemme. Jérusalem souhaite mettre un terme à “l’Axe du Mal” dirigé par l’Iran mais en fait réalise qu’un nouveau régime islamiste, lié à Al Qaïda et possédant un arsenal militaire syrien considérable, serait un véritable cauchemar.

 

Pour l’heure, rien à l’horizon ne prédit un cessez-le-feu, un compromis pour mettre fin aux hostilités et arrêter l’effusion de sang, ou une capitulation de l’un ou de l’autre camp.

 

Certes, Assad réussit à survivre, mais il n’est pas en mesure de mater la rébellion. L’économie du pays est en ruine et les zones touchées par la guerre civile sont sous les décombres. Des centaines de milliers de Syriens se refugient dans des camps installés en Jordanie, au Liban et en Turquie.

 

Le régime d’Assad est mis au ban de la société des nations et condamné dans tous les forums internationaux. Assad a survécu grâce à ses propres structures du pouvoir et à sa force militaire, mais surtout en raison du soutien de la Russie, de la Chine, et plus particulièrement de l’Iran et du Hezbollah.

 

Au cours de ces deux dernières années, les rebelles n’ont toujours pas réussi à conquérir une seule grande ville ni un aéroport international. Assad a fait usage de toutes ses armes pour assurer le contrôle des sites et des infrastructures stratégiques. Il a utilisé sa force aérienne et son artillerie, notamment des missiles Scud. Selon certaines informations, il aurait mis en service même des armes non-conventionnelles dont des armes chimiques. 

 

L’Armée Libre syrienne (ALS) n’est point protégée par les raids aériens massifs que lance souvent Assad et elle se trouve en grande difficulté pour mettre un terme au flux d’armes en provenance d’Iran. La revendication de l’ALS d’imposer une zone exempte de vols aériens au nord du pays et l’extension d’une zone protégée par le déploiement de missiles Patriot au sud de la Turquie a été également rejetée par les Etats-Unis.

 

Le Secrétaire d’Etat américain John Kerry avait demandé à Bagdad d’arrêter l’acheminement d’armes iraniennes à travers l’espace aérien irakien mais toutes ses démarches furent vaines.

 

La grande rébellion populaire tant espérée contre Assad s’est estompée. Certes, l’ALS représente toujours une menace réelle au régime comme les islamistes et Salafistes proches d’Al-Qaïda, armée et financée par le Qatar. Des volontaires et mercenaires venus d’Europe, d’Afrique du Nord (Libye et Tunisie), du Liban, d’Irak, de Jordanie et d’Egypte et même d’Extrême-Orient, dont la Chine, sont omniprésents sur le sol syrien et provoquent frictions et affrontements quotidiens avec l’ALS. Dans ce contexte, on peut comprendre les hésitations et la prudence des puissances occidentales et leur reconsidération de fournir à l’ALS des armes et des munitions sophistiquées.

 

La coalition nationale syrienne (CNS) établie à Istanbul en 2011 par l’AKP, le parti islamiste turc – à l’instar du Conseil national de transition en Libye (CNTL) –a été et restera sans doute un organisme non représentatif du peuple syrien, malgré les efforts déployés par le Qatar, l’Arabie saoudite et les Etats-Unis pour le remplacer au régime d’Assad.

 

Le conflit syrien a suscité de vives tensions entre sunnites et chiites au Liban. Des affrontements armés ont eu lieu, surtout à Tripoli, entre les partisans de l’ancien Premier ministre Saad Hariri parrainés par l’Arabie saoudite et le Qatar et les militants chiites d’Assad appuyés par le Hezbollah. Cette situation explosive, a provoqué la démission du Premier ministre libanais Mikati et les pressions du Hezbollah paralysent la gestion du pays du Cèdre.

 

Quant à la Jordanie, bien que le royaume hachémite fût épargné à ce jour du “printemps arabe” et de l’agitation sociale, le roi Abdallah craint en effet que des éléments islamistes extérieurs et hostiles cherchent à exploiter les frustrations populaires pour déstabiliser le pays et renverser le régime. Le roi a eu la sagesse d’initier des réformes politiques et a réussi ainsi à calmer les esprits. La présence inquiétante de centaines de milliers de réfugiés syriens a aussi conduit le roi à demander une aide économique substantielle aux Etats-Unis. Méfiant à l’égard de la Turquie d’Erdogan et de l’Egypte de Morsi, le roi hachémite navigue très prudemment, conscient que son pays pourrait être mis demain sur orbite islamique.

 

Concernant le rôle de Bagdad, des responsables irakiens craignent aussi qu’un mouvement de protestation croissant inspiré par la rébellion syrienne se transforme en une révolte contre le régime. La guerre en Syrie pourrait ainsi déstabiliser l’Irak et provoquer des affrontements ethniques. Cela explique la volonté du Premier ministre Nouri al-Maliki d’ignorer le transfert d’armes iraniennes à la Syrie via son espace aérien et ses craintes de voir un jour un régime sunnite à Damas.

 

Le soutien inconditionnel de l’Iran au régime d’Assad a porté un coup sévère à sa politique panislamique. Le monde arabe est bien conscient des véritables manigances de Téhéran qui cherche à faire flotter l’étendard chiite par des moyens subversifs.

 

Enfin, l’impuissance des pays occidentaux dans ce conflit demeure flagrante en raison de leur incapacité d’apporter une assistance militaire aux rebelles, comme ce fut le cas en Libye. En dépit des considérations juridiques internationales, les Etats-Unis et l’Europe n’ont pu obtenir le feu vert du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies pour apporter une aide militaire ou lancer une opération conjointe et ont dû se plier devant l’opposition farouche de la Russie et de la Chine. L’Occident s’est contenté d’aider les rebelles par l’assistance des services de renseignements, de la formation et de l’aide financière, gelant ainsi les capitaux syriens en Europe et ailleurs, et en établissant une liste noire des criminels de guerre. La France qui avait récemment suggéré de livrer des armes aux rebelles, affirmant que seule la supériorité militaire pourrait vaincre le régime, n’a pas obtenu gain de cause.

 

Deux ans après la révolte, l’affrontement entre les forces loyalistes et les rebelles semble être stabilisée. Un statu quo angoissant se dessine sur le terrain, rappelant ainsi la guerre civile du Liban des années 1970.

 

Si cette prédiction s’avère exacte, alors le conflit syrien ne sera guère résolu dans un proche avenir. Il est très difficile d’établir un calendrier mais toutefois, si le régime tombait un jour cela changerait complètement la donne géopolitique au Moyen-Orient.

 

La France est désormais un pays très peu sûr pour les Juifs

Guy Millière

menapress.org, 21 avril 2013

 

On le sait, le nombre d'actes antisémites en France, l'an dernier, a connu un très net accroissement, et l'essentiel de cet accroissement a suivi les assassinats perpétrés par Mohamed Merah à Toulouse, dans l'école Otzar Hatorah.

 

Tuer des enfants juifs dans une cour d'école a pétrifié d'horreur de nombreux Français. Cela a, hélas, aussi empli de joie d'autres gens vivant en France, qu'ils aient la nationalité française ou non. Et ces gens emplis de joie ont considéré que ce qu'avait fait Mohamed Merah était un exemple à suivre. Ils ont, en conséquence, suivi son exemple autant qu'ils le pouvaient.

 

On le sait aussi, les dirigeants politiques français condamnent l'antisémitisme, mais ils le font en termes vagues, si vagues qu'on ne sait jamais très exactement ce qu'ils condamnent, sauf lorsqu'ils parlent de ce qui s'est passé sous le maréchal Pétain, donc il y a peu ou prou soixante-dix ans.

 

Et condamner en termes vagues, ou condamner ce qui s'est passé sous le maréchal Pétain ne permet pas vraiment de lutter contre l'antisémitisme tel qu'il existe et se dissémine aujourd'hui. Dire qu'il existe un antisémitisme islamique est plus que jamais politiquement incorrect, et vaut à qui s'y risque l'accusation de « racisme islamophobe ».

 

Nul ne dira donc que Mohamed Merah avait des motivations islamistes ou, si c'est dit, ce le sera en passant très vite, et en ajoutant que l' « esprit islamiste » n'a rien à voir avec l'islam, cela « va de soi ». Et nul ne dira que ceux que les actes de Mohamed Merah ont empli de joie se trouvent très largement dans ce qu'il est convenu d'appeler les « banlieues de l'islam ». Je ne le dirai donc pas.

 

On le sait enfin, tout en condamnant l'antisémitisme en termes vagues, les dirigeants politiques français font comme s'ils ne voyaient pas la haine du seul Etat juif sur terre qui est en train de monter dans le pays comme un cancer en voie de généralisation.

 

Cette haine atteint pourtant des degrés absolument répugnants. Laisser de côté le fait que la haine de l'Etat juif imprégnait Mohamed Merah et qu'elle est tapie derrière l'essentiel des actes antisémites qui se commettent aujourd'hui en France équivaut à nier l'évidence.

Tout comme laisser de côté le fait que la haine de l'Etat juif qui monte dans le pays est très largement imprégnée de la vision d'Israël et des Juifs qui prévaut dans le monde musulman, tout particulièrement depuis qu’y déferle la vague islamiste.

 

Laisser de côté que la haine de l'Etat juif atteint gravement la gauche extrême, qui, emportée par sa détestation des sociétés ouvertes et de la civilisation occidentale, se fait l'idiote utile de la vague islamiste. Cette gauche pratique dès lors de l'antisémitisme tout en faisant semblant de ne pas le savoir, ce qui équivaut à nier l'évidence encore, et d'une manière particulièrement obscène.

 

La gauche extrême gravement atteinte courtise ainsi les assassins de Juifs agissant au nom d'une cause islamique. Et elle en fait même ses idoles.

C'est ce qu'on a observé lorsque la municipalité de Bezons, en banlieue parisienne, a décerné voici peu le titre de citoyen d'honneur à Majdi Rahima Rimawi, coupable d'avoir tué le ministre israélien Rehavam Zeevi. C'est ce que l'on a vu lors des réceptions organisées pour glorifier Salah Hamouri, qui n'a pas réussi à tuer sa victime (mais qui avait tout fait pour)

 

C'est ce qu'on a vu cette semaine avec la soirée consacrée, le 17 avril dernier à Saint Denis, à Amir Jabar Sharif Sawalma et Allam Kaabi (appelés fraternellement par leurs prénoms sur les tracts et dans les communiqués des organisateurs), criminels membres du FPLP, l'organisation dont les égorgeurs de la famille Fogel en 2011 faisaient partie

Que des êtres abjects tels ceux dont je cite ici le nom puissent être « honorés » ou glorifiés de quelque façon que ce soit devrait être suffisant pour montrer qu'il y a quelque chose de profondément pourri en France, et que la situation atteint un degré qui devrait appeler un sursaut éthique.

 

Que ces êtres abjects puissent être affublés, comme cela a été le cas à Saint Denis, le 17 avril, du titre de « prisonniers politiques » constitue un crachat symbolique sur la notion même de «

 

L'enfant intérieur

Lysiane Gagnon

La Presse, 20 avril 2013

 

Un mélange de gauchisme juvénile et de «psychologie pop». C'est ainsi qu'on pourrait qualifier la réaction de Justin Trudeau à la tragédie de Boston. Une réaction que le premier ministre Harper n'a pas tardé à fustiger, et pour cause.

 

C'était la première fois que le nouveau chef libéral réagissait à chaud depuis son élection à la tête du PLC, lors d'une interview à la CBC, et le résultat a eu de quoi confirmer les craintes de ceux qui le trouvent léger et immature.

 

Son premier réflexe a été de compatir aux malheurs de l'auteur (alors inconnu) de l'attentat.

 

«Il faut regarder les causes profondes… Il n'y a pas de doute que c'est arrivé parce qu'il y a quelqu'un quelque part qui se sent complètement exclu. Complètement en guerre avec des innocents…  Et notre attitude doit être, d'où ces tensions proviennent-elles? Oui, il faut de la sécurité, mais nous ne devons pas cultiver la peur et la méfiance. Parce que cela finirait par marginaliser encore plus ceux qui se sentent déjà les ennemis de la société».

 

La théorie des «root causes», qui transforme le meurtrier en victime, est populaire dans bien des milieux même si, depuis le temps qu'elle roule, elle n'a jamais débouché sur des conclusions solides. On sait, exemples à l'appui, que ni la misère, ni l'exploitation, ni le racisme, encore moins le sentiment d'exclusion, n'expliquent le terrorisme. Il y a plein de gens qui se sentent malheureux et mal-aimés, et ils ne posent pas de bombes.

 

Mais surtout, ce n'est pas le genre de réflexion qu'on attend d'un homme qui veut être premier ministre, quelques heures après un désastre pareil. Qu'aurait-on dit si un politicien s'était d'abord soucié de la psyché blessée de Marc Lépine avant même que ses victimes eussent été enterrées?

 

Les chefs de gouvernement ne sont pas des thérapeutes et ce qu'on attend d'eux c'est qu'ils se tiennent debout et qu'ils prennent les moyens pour protéger la société, comme Obama l'a fait superbement cette semaine.

 

Et quelle formulation! «Il y a quelqu'un qui se sent exclu…». Qu'est-ce que ce langage puéril tout droit sorti des thérapies à l'eau de rose?

 

Justin Trudeau aurait-il un côté «nouvel âge» ? À entendre parler sa femme, dont il a déjà dit qu'elle était sa partenaire en politique comme dans la vie privée, le couple semble en tout cas baigner dans cette mentalité.

 

En février dernier, le Globe and Mail décrivait une conférence prononcée par Sophie Grégoire devant un groupe d'enseignantes ontariennes. Au dire du reporter, Mme Grégoire, qui enseigne le yoga, parlait comme «une guérisseuse nouvel âge» (a New Age healer) davantage que comme une épouse de politicien.

 

«La respiration est la pulsation intérieure divine», proclama-t-elle avant de psalmodier  une invocation en sanskrit et de proclamer, devant un auditoire en délire, que «le sacré féminin gagne du terrain».

 

Présentant son mari au lancement de la campagne au leadership, elle loue «la pureté de ses intentions…». «Il est intelligent, il a une équipe formidable, mais au-delà de tout cela, il y a la pureté qui coule dans son sang… Ce qui m'a vraiment attirée vers lui, c'est son enfant intérieur (the child within).

 

«Nous avons besoin de plus de bonté dans la société, et les gens sont non seulement prêts à élever leur pensée, mais aussi à raffiner leur niveau de conscientisation humaine…».

 

Compte tenu de la popularité des bouquins de croissance personnelle, on peut croire que cette philosophie plaira à bien des gens, mais d'autres y verront plutôt matière à inquiétude.

 

Dr.Manfred Gerstenfeld: Has The Netherlands Gone Mad On Jewish Issues?

Dr.Manfred Gerstenfeld: Has The Netherlands Gone Mad On Jewish Issues?

Manfred Gerstenfeld 

Tundra Tabloids, Apr. 5, 2013

http://www.tundratabloids.com/2013/04/dr-manfred-gerstenfeld-has-the-netherlands-gone-mad-on-jewish-issues.html

 

One has to wonder…….

 

HAS THE NETHERLANDS GONE MAD ON JEWISH ISSUES?

 

In February the Dutch national media “forgot” to report on a mainstream TV broadcast in which a number of Dutch Turkish youngsters praised Hitler, the Holocaust and the killing of Jewish babies. On the English language web the issue got far more attention. Thereupon the Simon Wiesenthal Center wrote to the Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte asking him to investigate anti-Semitism in the Netherlands.  This letter finally started a debate in the media and parliament. In the meantime the interviewer of the youngsters, himself a Dutchman of Turkish descent, had to go into hiding after receiving death threats.

 

The reply of Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte to the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s letter has now been published. Rutte writes that the statements by the youngsters were “shocking and reprehensible.” He promises a detailed series of action and investigations. It would be important for the Simon Wiesenthal Center to check back later this year and examine which of the Prime Minister’s promises have materialized. Over the past few years, there have been three discussions held on anti-Semitism in the Dutch Parliament. They have however, hardly led to any concrete results in the battle against the country’s anti-Semitism.

 

Negative news coming out of the Netherlands which has impacted upon Jews has continued in the past few weeks. The municipality of the village of Bronckhorst has decided that its official delegation on National Memorial Day this 4th of May, will also honor fallen soldiers of Nazi Germany who are buried in the village, in addition to the Dutch dead during the Second World War. Last year, a judge prevented this, but a Higher Court has since lifted the prohibition.

 

A new report prepared for the Anne Frank Foundation showed that complaints about severe anti-Semitic acts received by police have increased from 19 in 2010, to 30 in 2011. The total number of complaints about anti-Semitic incidents has remained about the same at 2,700. This large number of complaints is but a fraction of what goes on, as many people do not report to the monitoring organizations.

 

MDI, an organization which tracks discrimination on Dutch internet sites found that in 2012, anti-Semitism/Holocaust denial was again by far the chief category of internet hate at 28 percent. It is followed by expressions of hatred of Muslims at 19%. This is against a background where the Muslim population in the Netherlands is around 1 million – at least 20 times the number of Jews. MDI concludes that contemporary anti-Semitism has been mainstreamed in the Netherlands. MDI also reported that the Dutch government has eliminated funding for them claiming that this was due to budget considerations.

 

Last month, Parliamentarian Dion Graus of the Freedom Party led by Geert Wilders put forward a motion to forbid all ritual slaughter, whether stunned or not. There is no majority support for this position, yet it is another indication of the Dutch obsession with animal rights, which can be contrasted with the “benign” neglect of the country’s anti-Semitism problems.

 

It has now become known, more than 65 years after the Second World War, that the city of Amsterdam fined hundreds of Jewish Holocaust survivors for tax avoidance when they were held in concentration camps or hiding from the Nazis.

 

All this comes against a background in which the Dutch government has consistently refused to apologize for the failure of the Dutch government in exile in London during the Second World War to meet its responsibilities toward its persecuted Dutch Jewish population. Almost all other European governments have since apologized or admitted guilt for the conduct of their authorities under Germany’s occupation.

 

As far as Israel is concerned, the Dutch government wants to pass legislation which will impose labeling on all products from the disputed West Bank territories. No such law has been proposed for the Turkish occupation in part of Cyprus and the parts of the Sahara occupied by Morocco.

 

The leader of the second largest Dutch party Diederik Samsom attacked Israel at his party’s first congress on the Middle East. He said that Israel transgresses international law. Samsom “forgot” to mention that the Netherlands itself doesn’t obey international law.  Despite it being a signatory of the U.N Convention on Genocide, it has not tried to bring Iran before an international court.

 

If the Dutch government is indeed finally committed to act against anti-Semitism, it will first have to investigate its sources and nature in great detail. Particular emphasis should be placed on the Muslim population, as there are many indications that anti-Semitism there is far wider spread and has more severe expressions than within the autochthonous population.

 

Additionally, all of this must be seen in the context of the extreme demonization of Israel. Almost 39% of the Dutch population believes that Israel intends to exterminate the Palestinians. These data have been concealed by the Dutch media.[13] Any investigation into anti-Semitism in the Netherlands should also examine how this diabolical viewpoint has been arrived at, and who exactly ascribes to it.

LA GUERRE DE GAZA ET LE HAMAS APOCALYPTIQUE

 

 

 

 

 

 

DÉCLARATIONS DU PREMIER MINISTRE ISRAÉLIEN BENJAMIN NETANYAHU –
FIN DE L’OPÉRATION « PILIER DE DÉFENSE »

Ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères, 22 novembre 2012

 

Il ya huit jours, Israël a lancé l’opération Pilier de Défense. Le gouvernement a décidé de lancer cette opération à la suite des attaques terroristes en provenance de la bande de Gaza et de leur augmentation massive au cours des derniers mois. J’avais annoncé que nous allions réagir fermement à ces attaques lorsque le moment serait venu. J’avais dit que nous ferions payer un prix lourd aux organisations terroristes palestiniennes.

 

Les organisations terroristes ont supposé que nous voulions éviter une action offensive contre elles, elles ont eu tort. Nous avons frappé leurs commandants supérieurs, nous avons détruit des milliers de roquettes qui visaient le sud d’Israël ainsi que la plupart de celles qui visaient le centre d’Israël, et nous avons écrasé les installations de contrôle du Hamas. Je dois insister sur le fait que nous avons effectué ces opérations avec le plein soutien des instances dirigeantes de la communauté internationale.

 

Je tiens à remercier en particulier le Président des États-Unis Barack Obama pour son soutien résolu aux actions d’Israël, à cette opération et au droit d’Israël de se défendre. Je le remercie aussi pour son soutien au système Iron Dome. Je remercie la secrétaire d’État, Hillary Clinton, et j’exprime ma gratitude aux Égyptiens pour leurs efforts dans la réalisation de ce cessez-le-feu.

 

Lors d’une conversation téléphonique que j’ai eue ce soir avec le président Obama, j’ai accepté de donner une chance au cessez-le-feu, avec l’objectif d’une accalmie et de permettre aux citoyens d’Israël un retour à la vie normale. Toutefois, Israël ne peut évidemment pas rester les bras croisés alors que ses ennemis se renforcent avec des armes de terreur. Nous avons donc décidé, le président Obama et moi-même, que les États-Unis et Israël travailleront ensemble pour lutter contre la contrebande d’armes des organisations terroristes palestiniennes – armes, dont la quasi-totalité vient de l’Iran.

 

Depuis le jour de la création de l’État d’Israël a été créé, nous avons dû faire face à des défis complexes dans la région et nous pouvons tous voir que ces défis sont devenus encore plus complexes au cours de ces dernières années. Dans ces conditions, nous sommes tenus de manœuvrer à bon escient et de façon responsable, tout en tenant compte de toutes les considérations militaires et politiques. C’est ce qu’un gouvernement responsable fait, et c’est ce que nous avons fait ici : nous avons usé de notre puissance militaire, mais aussi tenu compte de considérations politiques.

 

Aujourd’hui, je me rends compte que certains citoyens souhaitent une prolongation de l’action militaire et celle-ci pourrait très bien s’avérer nécessaire. Mais à l’heure actuelle, la bonne chose pour l’État d’Israël est de repousser cette possibilité au bénéfice d’un cessez-le-feu à long terme. En tant que Premier ministre, j’ai la responsabilité – et c’est la ma plus haute responsabilité – de prendre les mesures qui s’imposent pour assurer notre sécurité. C’est ce que j’ai toujours fait et c’est ce que je vais continuer à faire.

 

Au cours de la semaine dernière, Israël a perdu plusieurs de ses citoyens. Au nom de toute la nation, j’adresse mes condoléances aux familles endeuillées et je souhaite aux blessés un prompt rétablissement.

 

Je tiens à remercier mes collaborateurs, le ministre de la Défense Ehud Barak et le ministre des Affaires étrangères Avigdor Liberman. Nous avons travaillé ensemble comme une équipe. Je remercie également les neuf membres du cabinet ministériel, le Conseil des ministres et le gouvernement, pour avoir oeuvré – chacun dans son domaine de responsabilité – pour les citoyens d’Israël. J’apprécie également le travail de l’opposition et de tous les membres de la Knesset qui nous ont proclamé leur soutien.

 

Je remercie le chef d’état-major, le général Benny Gantz, le chef du Shin Bet, Yoram Cohen, le directeur du Mossad, Tamir Pardo et toutes leurs équipes pour les efforts exceptionnels qu’ils ont mis en œuvre dans cette opération. Au nom du peuple d’Israël, je remercie les commandants et les soldats de Tsahal, les pilotes, les opérateurs et les développeurs du « Dôme de fer », les services de renseignement, tous les membres des services de sécurité et les réservistes, qui ont quitté leurs familles et immédiatement accepté de faire leur devoir.

 

J’apprécie de même le travail des maires et des présidents des conseils régionaux qui ont fait preuve de leadership et de sang-froid sur le front, et surtout, je vous salue vous, les citoyens d’Israël.

 

Nous avons une armée forte.

 

Nous avons un peuple fort.

 

Je suis fier d’être votre Premier ministre.

 

POURQUOI LE HAMAS EST RESPONSABLE

DE TOUTES LES VICTIMES CIVILES
David Ouellette
davidouellette.net, 20 novembre 2012

 

Depuis le 10 novembre, le Hamas et ses alliés terroristes à Gaza ont frappé Israël avec plus de 1100 missiles et tirs de mortiers en lançant délibérément leurs attaques au cœur de quartiers peuplés de civils palestiniens. Ces terroristes palestiniens ont transformé les hôpitaux, les maisons, les écoles et les mosquées en bases de tireurs embusqués et dépôts d’armes, où ils se servent des civils comme autant de boucliers humains.
 
La réponse d’Israël au terrorisme constant de Gaza est proportionnée et respecte le droit international
 
• L’opération militaire israélienne est un acte de légitime défense, un droit consacré par l’article 51 de la Charte des Nations Unies. Son objectif est de mettre un terme à plus de 8 000 tirs de missiles sur les citoyens israéliens depuis qu’Israël s’est entièrement retiré de Gaza en 2005.
 
• Les actions d’Israël pour faire cesser les attaques aux missiles du Hamas sont proportionnelles au risque encouru par les civils israéliens, dont la possibilité de pertes de vie massives : 4,5 millions d’entre eux vivent à portée des frappes palestiniennes. Israël ne doit pas attendre qu’un missile touche une école pleine d’enfants avant d’agir.
 
• En vertu du droit international, tout État doit tenter de minimiser le nombre de victimes civiles chez son adversaire alors qu’il cherche à atteindre son objectif militaire. En conséquence, Israël effectue des frappes chirurgicales pour atteindre ses objectifs, tout comme il l’a fait lorsqu’il a éliminé le principal chef militaire du Hamas Ahmad Jabari et détruit des sites stratégiques de lancement de missiles.
 
• Israël a largué des milliers de tracts avertissant les habitants de Gaza d’éviter les zones utilisées par le Hamas pour lancer ses attaques contre Israël et a fait des milliers d’appels téléphoniques dans les zones ciblées pour avertir les citoyens qu’ils sont en danger.
 
• Alors qu’Israël s’efforce de minimiser les pertes civiles, le droit international interdit également l’utilisation de civils pour protéger des cibles militaires légitimes, comme le Hamas l’a toujours fait au mépris de sa propre population. L’article 28 de la Quatrième Convention de Genève stipule clairement: «Aucune personne protégée ne pourra être utilisée pour mettre, par sa présence, certains points ou certaines régions à l’abri des opérations militaires ».
 
• Selon le droit international, le Hamas est responsable des victimes parmi les civils dont il se sert comme boucliers humains.

 

LE HAMAS :
UN MOUVEMENT ISLAMISTE APOCALYPTIQUE

Paul Landau
upjf.org, 19 novembre 2012

 

L'erreur la plus répandue lorsque l'on parle des mouvements islamistes contemporains, et notamment du Hamas, consiste à les envisager à l’aide des concepts et des manières de penser propres à l'Occident. La plupart des analyses occidentales du phénomène islamiste ont souvent tendance à sous-estimer, voire à occulter un aspect fondamental, que l'on retrouve dans toutes les différentes mouvances et organisations islamistes : celui des croyances religieuses musulmanes, et plus précisément de l'eschatologie musulmane.

 

C'est ainsi qu'un islamologue français réputé, auteur d'ouvrages importants sur l'islamisme contemporain, peut expliquer la révolution islamique iranienne de 1979 par "l'alliance de la bourgeoisie pieuse et de la jeunesse urbaine pauvre ", et que de nombreux journalistes continuent à décrire les auteurs – palestiniens et autres – des attentats-suicides comme des "désespérés" et des laissés pour compte, alors même que toutes les recherches entreprises sur le sujet démontrent que cette grille de lecture sociologique ou marxisante ne correspond pas à la réalité.

 

Il est impossible de comprendre les succès remportés par le Hamas, depuis les élections palestiniennes il y a presque deux ans, et la persistance de l'islamisme – dont de nombreux observateurs occidentaux annoncent régulièrement l'essoufflement ou même la prochaine disparition – si l'on fait abstraction des croyances des acteurs des mouvements islamistes ou si l'on en diminue l'importance, en les considérant comme des balivernes moyenâgeuses dénuées de signification concrète.

 

Il faut écouter ce que disent les islamistes et accorder du poids à leur discours, si l'on veut tenter de comprendre leurs motivations et leurs stratégies. Il est significatif à cet égard de constater que les médias occidentaux, qui parlent régulièrement des événements du Proche-Orient et de la rivalité entre le Hamas et le Fatah, ne mentionnent presque jamais la Charte du mouvement islamiste.

 

Une analyse courante du mouvement islamiste palestinien consiste à en faire un clone du Fatah, dont il ne diffèrerait que par l'habillage religieux donné à son combat contre Israël. Selon cette conception, répandue dans les chancelleries occidentales, il suffirait d'attendre patiemment pour que le Hamas modère ses ambitions et accepte d'entrer dans le jeu des négociations afin de parvenir à une coexistence avec Israël.

 

Le préambule de la Charte du Hamas affirme pourtant de manière claire la centralité du "combat contre les Juifs", qui doit être mené "jusqu'à ce que [les] ennemis soient vaincus et que la victoire d'Allah soit établie". Pour saisir la conception de l'islam qui est celle du Hamas, il faut accepter de mettre de côté l’idée occidentale de la religion, conçue comme une sphère bien délimitée de l'existence. L'histoire de l'Occident chrétien est en effet celle d'une relégation toujours plus poussée de la part du religieux dans l'existence. C'est pourquoi il est difficile pour un occidental de se représenter la manière dont un Musulman non occidentalisé peut concevoir l'islam.

 

Un des aspects essentiels – et méconnus – de l'islamisme contemporain est celui des croyances eschatologiques. La dimension eschatologique de l'islam à souvent été minimisée, parfois pour des raisons polémiques, le christianisme se présentant comme la seule religion tournée vers l'au-delà, en rejetant l'islam dans le domaine des seules préoccupations terrestres.

 

Cette dimension oubliée est fondamentale dans la résurgence actuelle d'un islam conquérant, car elle traverse tous les clivages du monde musulman – entre sunnisme et chiisme, entre islam traditionnel et islamisme contemporain – et permet de comprendre de très nombreux aspects du réveil de l'islam.

 

Comme l'explique un historien français, "l'eschatologie représente un des traits fondamentaux de la religion musulmane. L'imminence de la fin des temps et du Jugement dernier est l'un des thèmes coraniques les plus anciens et les plus constants, qui parcourt l'ensemble du texte sacré de l'islam". Mohammed étant le dernier prophète (le "sceau de la prophétie"), sa venue inaugure la dernière période de l'histoire universelle, c'est-à-dire la période eschatologique.

 

Dans son recueil de Hadith intitulé "Les grands signes de la fin du monde depuis la mission du prophète jusqu'au retour de Jésus", Abdallah al-Hajjaj cite une parole du prophète, affirmant en levant sa main que sa mission et l'Heure dernière étaient rapprochées comme son majeur de son index. Cette croyance à l'imminence de la fin des temps est un aspect fondamental du réveil de l'islam dans le monde actuel, sous ses formes pacifiques et guerrières.

 

L'islam chiite est parfois présenté comme étant le seul à accorder une importance aux considérations eschatologiques. Il est vrai que le thème du retour de l'Imam caché, élément central des croyances de l'islam chiite, se prête facilement aux interprétations eschatologiques. Depuis la révolution islamique iranienne, en 1979, les aspirations eschatologiques occupent le devant de la scène au sein du monde musulman chiite. La croyance en l'imminence du Jugement dernier permet d'expliquer tant les comportements suicidaires, qui se sont multipliés depuis les années 1980, lors de la guerre Iran-Irak, que l’attitude actuelle du dirigeant iranien Ahmadinejad.

 

Mais l'eschatologie est tout autant présente dans l'islam sunnite, et elle joue un rôle central dans le développement des mouvements islamistes sunnites. Toutes les composantes de la mouvance islamiste contemporaine, depuis les Frères musulmans jusqu'au Hamas et à la nébuleuse Al-Qaida, partagent en effet l'espoir de voir le Califat islamique reconstitué et considèrent le "renouveau de l'islam" comme le signe manifeste de la véracité des prophéties concernant la victoire finale de l'islam et sa propagation dans le monde entier….

 

PROCHE-ORIENT:
VANDALISME ANTI-ISRAÉLIEN À MONTRÉAL

Philippe Teisceira-Lessard
lapresse.ca, 21 novembre 2012

 

Les affrontements qui font rage dans la bande de Gaza et le sud d'Israël ont des répercussions jusqu'à Montréal.

 

Dans les dernières heures, le bureau d'un professeur de l'Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) a été la cible de vandalisme, a appris La Presse.

 

«Des propos haineux et racistes ont été inscrits sur la porte du professeur Julien Bauer dans la nuit de mardi à mercredi», a écrit le directeur du département de sciences politiques de l'UQAM, Julian Durazo Hermann, dans un courriel envoyé aux étudiants et au personnel.

 

En arrivant ce matin au bureau, M. Durazo Hermann est tombé sur un immense graffiti dessiné à la peinture noire qui disait: «Heil Israël. Pour penser qu'il y a un axe du mal, il faut pas un niveau intellectuel très élevé.»

 

Le professeur Julien Bauer est de confession juive et se spécialise en politique du Proche-Orient. Dans les dernières années, il a souvent exprimé des positions en appui au gouvernement israélien dans les médias.

 

Il a aussi écrit des lettres ouvertes pour dénoncer les positions propalestiniennes de groupes de gauche du Québec.

 

«Ces méfaits ont déjà été rapportés au Service de la sécurité et de la prévention de l'UQAM et une enquête est en cours, dit le directeur du département dans son message. Les tentatives d'intimider et réduire au silence des membres de la communauté universitaire, quelle que soit leur position, sont inacceptables.»

 

En entrevue, M. Durazo Hermann a ajouté que les positions de M. Bauer lui attirent toujours beaucoup de critiques et échauffent parfois les esprits. Mais c'est la première fois qu'un tel incident survient à son bureau, selon lui.

LA BARBARIE ISLAMIQUE S’AFFRONTE À LA LÉTHARGIE DE L’ONU

 

LA BARBARIE ISLAMIQUE

Guy Millière

dreuz.info, 19 juin 2012

Voici quelque temps, le gouvernement israélien a décidé de restituer les corps d’assassins à l’Autorité Palestinienne et au Hamas. Comme on pouvait s’y attendre, cette restitution a été prise comme un signe de victoire par les populations arabes sous le contrôle de l’Autorité Palestinienne comme par les populations arabes sous le contrôle du Hamas.

Le contraire eut été très étonnant. A chaque fois que des Israéliens sont assassinés, ces gens font la fête par milliers. Les rues de Ramallah et de Gaza City portent des noms d’assassins, qui sont considérés comme des héros ou, plus précisément, des « martyrs ». Les télévisions « palestiniennes » financées avec l’argent occidental sont des organes d’incitation à la haine antisémite et au meurtre. Les manuels scolaires « palestiniens » sont des instruments servant aux mêmes fins.

S’il fallait une preuve supplémentaire qu’aucune paix n’est possible avec le Hamas, bien sûr, mais aussi avec l’Autorité Palestinienne, on en disposerait ainsi. Mais faut-il une preuve supplémentaire ? Les preuves sont abondantes, et absolument accablantes, depuis longtemps. Ceux qui ne veulent pas voir sont des aveugles volontaires dont je ne peux m’empêcher de penser qu’ils sont imprégnés d’intentions aussi vomitives qu’inavouables.

Les gens qu’on nomme « Palestiniens » ne pourraient vivre en paix avec leurs voisins qu’après de nombreuses années passées en désintoxication, et ces années passées en désintoxication devraient être un préalable à toute forme de geste ou de déclaration. La désintoxication ne pourrait venir, bien sûr, qu’après un changement de régime à Gaza et dans l’Autorité Palestinienne.

Ce changement de régime devrait commencer par l’abolition du Hamastan de Gaza et par l’abolition de l’Autorité Palestinienne. Ces abolitions devront venir. Elles viendront tôt ou tard. Ceux qui pensent que des accords sont possibles avec le Hamas ou avec l’Autorité Palestinienne me font penser à ceux qui pensaient en 1938 qu’on pouvait s’entendre en Europe avec Adolf Hitler. Et ce n’est sans doute pas un hasard si Mein Kampf est un best seller dans une bonne part du monde arabe. Fort heureusement, le Hamas et l’Autorité palestinienne ont des moyens très réduits par rapport à ceux dont disposait Hitler.

Un changement de régime à Gaza et dans les territoires de Judée-Samarie occupés par l’Autorité Palestinienne serait un commencement en direction du règlement de la guerre musulmane contre Israël. Mais le règlement ne pourra venir tant qu’existera encore le mal, plus vaste, qui touche toutes les terres d’islam et une large part de la « communauté des croyants ». Et ce mal doit être regardé en face. Il existe une barbarie islamique qui touche depuis des années l’ensemble du monde musulman, et la barbarie « palestinienne » fait partie intégrante de la barbarie islamique. Les exemples de barbarie islamique sont trop nombreux pour qu’on les énumère. Il y faudrait des pages et des pages.

Faut-il rappeler les crimes innommables commis pendant des années par le GIA et le FIS en Algérie ? Faut-il évoquer les innombrables attentats commis par Al Qaida, qui ne se limitent pas aux attaques du 11 septembre 2001 ? Faut-il rappeler les actes abjects commis en Irak sous la dictature de Saddam Hussein et après la chute de celui-ci ? Faut-il dire, n’en déplaise à Bernard Henri Levy, que la Libye est passée des mains d’un dictateur brutal aux mains de hordes et de milices qui ont assassiné par centaines des noirs africains et mis en circulation des armes qui se retrouvent dans le Sinaï ? Faut-il décrire les meurtres commis par les talibans en Afghanistan, par des islamistes pakistanais en Inde ? Faut-il parler des scènes d’égorgements filmés en vidéo qui ont jalonnée la dernière décennie ? Faut-il parler des attentats multiples déjoués par les services de sécurité du monde entier ? Les attentats non islamiques sont des exceptions qui confirment la règle.

Je persiste à dire que tous les musulmans ne sont pas coupables, mais je dois rappeler que les coupables de la barbarie islamique sont musulmans. Et je dois dire que la barbarie islamique est le danger principal aujourd’hui sur la terre. La barbarie islamique passera et s’éteindra. Elle est stérile et destructrice, et ne peut donc que passer et s’éteindre. Ce qui importe est de veiller à ce qu’elle fasse le moins de dégâts possible avant qu’elle passe et s’éteigne. Ce qui importe est de ne se faire aucune illusion à son égard. Strictement aucune illusion. Ce qui importe est de l’appeler par son nom et de ne pas avoir à son égard des attitudes à géométrie variable, en considérant, par exemple, que la barbarie « palestinienne » peut être dissociée du reste de la barbarie islamique.

Nous sommes dans une guerre planétaire et multiforme. Nous devons la voir comme telle. Et, puisque c’est à l’ordre du jour, nous devons voir que ce qui se passe présentement en Syrie relève aussi de la barbarie islamique. J’avais écrit au début de l’intervention contre le régime Kadhafi en Libye que le choix serait entre la peste et le choléra. Le choléra Kadhafi a perdu, la peste a gagné.

Je dis qu’en Syrie, le choix est à nouveau entre la peste et le choléra. Le moment où des modérés auraient pu émerger est passé. Le choix est désormais entre le régime Assad et ses meurtres de masse, et un pouvoir passant aux mains des Frères musulmans, et des meurtres de masse. C’est abominable.

C’est la barbarie islamique qui est abominable. 

LA CRISE SYRIENNE

ET LE RÔLE INSIGNIFIANT DE L’ONU

Dore Gold

Le Cape de Jérusalem, 19 juin 2012

La crise syrienne est la troisième preuve d’une série d’échecs de l’ONU. Durant ces deux dernières décennies, l’Organisation des Nations-Unies a  échoué dans ses tentatives  d’empêcher des massacres. Son incapacité flagrante d’intervenir au moment voulu dans les crises au Rwanda et en Bosnie. De nombreux éditorialistes évoquent même la faillite de l’organisation en raison de son cuisant échec d’accomplir l’un de ces principaux objectifs pour lesquels elle a été créée.

En 1994, le commandant des forces onusiennes au Rwanda, le général Romeo Delair, a expédié un message urgent au siège de l’ONU à New York. S’appuyant sur des informations crédibles, il alarmait que les dirigeants du pays, originaires de la tribu Hutu, avaient l’intention de commettre des massacres contre les Tutsis. Kofi Annan, alors chargé des Forces de la paix au sein de l’ONU, avait répondu en priant le commandant Delair de s’abstenir de toute ingérence. .. Et quelques mois plus tard…plus de 800 mille Rwandais sont massacrés!

L’échec de l’ONU se poursuivra  avec le déclenchement de la guerre en Bosnie, le cœur de l’Europe. Le Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU avait créé « une zone de sécurité » située dans les environs de la ville Srebrenica afin de garantir la sécurité aux musulmans bosniaques. Le Commandant local des Forces de l’ONU a assuré sa protection en ces termes: « croyez-moi, je vous promets de ne plus jamais vous quitter ». .. Et quelques temps plus tard, en juillet 1995, l’armée serbe- bosniaque  attaque l’enclave de Srebrenica et massacre plus de 8000 musulmans!

 Ainsi, à chaque fois que l’ONU est mise à l’épreuve, à chaque fois que ses forces pour le maintien de la paix dans le monde souhaitent protéger des populations en détresse elles échouent dans leur mission. Aujourd’hui, l’ONU affronte une « nouvelle Srebrenica »… Depuis mars 2011, une guerre civile se déchaîne en Syrie, mais en raison du veto imposé par les Russes et par les Chinois ce n’est qu’en mai 2012, seulement après  le massacre d’une centaine de civils dont de nombreux enfants à Houla, que le Conseil de Sécurité  condamne le régime d’Assad sans toutefois prendre des mesures adéquates.

 En février 2012, une nouvelle initiative de l’ONU dirigée par l’ancien Secrétaire général Kofi Annan et mandatée par la Ligue arabe échoue également et embarrasse fortement l’Occident. Dans ce contexte, il est clair que la raison principale de tous ces échecs   découle des intérêts des pays membres de l’organisation. L’ONU refuse d’adopter la morale et de condamner vigoureusement les responsables des massacres ou prendre contre eux des mesures efficaces.

 Le 28 mai dernier, le Wall Street Journal a même qualifié l’ONU « de collaborateur » pour avoir permis le massacre de Houla, et celui de Srebrenica en 1995. C’est sans doute une sévère critique, mais elle est justifiée par un argument essentiel que nous ne pouvons ignorer : l’ONU est une organisation dont les attentes de protection au sein des populations en détresse et regardant la mort en face sont quasiment immenses. En réalité, la déception est si profonde que l’impuissance de l’organisation onusienne.

 Si l’ONU est incapable de prendre des décisions pour éviter des génocides, et ne distingue pas entre assassins et victimes, est-il juste et possible  de lui attribuer  sérieusement un poids moral quelconque à ces déclarations au sujet du conflit israélo-palestinien ? La crise syrienne n’est-elle pas éloquente? N’illustre-t-elle pas la perte d’autorité morale qu’avait jadis l’ONU? Israël doit réaliser la situation néfaste et répliquer dans ce sens à chaque fois qu’un fonctionnaire officiel de cette organisation ose nous condamner injustement. 

LA MALTRAITANCE SYMBOLIQUE DES JUIFS

Shmuel Trigano

upjf.org, 17 juin 2012

L’antisémitisme ne se résume pas aux actes violents qui peuvent frapper les Juifs dans la rue mais il comprend aussi un climat général d’inimitié et d’exécration touchant plus que les Juifs et l’État d’Israël : le judaïsme et la culture juive, l’identité juive elle même. De l’inimitié, on est en règle générale au courant, sauf les inconscients qui sont nombreux, y compris parmi les Juifs qui se sentent par principe coupables ou ont un compte à régler avec leurs origines. La scène médiatique est la scène de cette inimitié. Elle se manifeste par une hostilité de principe à Israël ou à la communauté juive quand elle sort de son image de « victimes de la Shoah » (on aura remarqué qu’elle est ou bien « martyre » ou bien « agressive » : ce sont ses 2 images autorisées).

Le scénario d’interprétation des événements du Moyen Orient est prêt avant même que les événements n’arrivent. Ils sont alors construits pour répéter la même histoire et l’enraciner encore plus dans les consciences. Son trait principal repose sur la culpabilité essentielle d’Israël, son illégitimité et sa criminalité : à Djénine, à Gaza il y a eu un génocide et l’État d’Israël souffre d’un racisme institutionnel qui tient à l’essence même de son existence. Ce mythe est omniprésent et il est partagé autant par la classe politique que l’opinion publique. Les perpétrateurs d’actes antisémites y puisent implicitement la raison et la légitimité de leurs actes.

Par contre, de l’exécration, l’opinion juive commune est moins consciente car elle se développe dans la littérature, les essais, les magazines, l’université. Il faut aussi, dans ces milieux, avoir l’esprit aiguisé pour la percevoir car elle concerne le judaïsme comme religion, pensée, culture, société. Ce domaine met en jeu, pourrait-on dire, le prestige de l’identité juive, son honneur, sans compter la vérité historique et la compétence académique.

Or ce sont les lieux mêmes de la production culturelle qui sont touchés. Il faut savoir par exemple que, dans les universités, les Instituts d’études politiques, c’est un discours qui accrédite la version palestinienne des faits qui est la référence, sans aucune confrontation possible avec d’autres thèses, et cela remonte jusqu’au Collège de France. Des générations d’étudiants qui, plus tard, assumeront des responsabilités politiques, sont ainsi formées, nourries d’une version viciée de l’histoire.

Plus généralement, sur le plan du destin étudiant, choisir un sujet de doctorat en rapport avec les Juifs (en quelque matière que ce soit) équivaut aujourd’hui à un suicide professionnel car cela vous condamne à être exclu en premier des jurys de sélection pour les rares postes universitaires au concours, sous prétexte de particularisme, d’étroitesse d’esprit ou de choix « idéologique » (« religieux »). On n’étudie pas les choses juives comme on étudie l’Amérique latine, ou le monde… arabe.

Le discrédit s’exerce en premier, bien sûr, sur le judaïsme dont la destruction symbolique est joyeusement perpétrée dans livres, magazines, compte-rendus de presse, sauf rarissimes exceptions. Si vous examinez dans le détail la place qui est reconnue au judaïsme et la façon de le traiter (notamment dans toute cette presse sur les religions – en fait, au départ, presse catholique – produisant nombre de numéros spéciaux sur religions, spiritualités et civilisations), vous remarquerez le traitement défavorable dont il est l’objet (souvent mis en œuvre par des spécialistes juifs). Par contre, l’islam y occupe une place centrale et abusive.

On a l’impression que le refoulé du tabou sur l’islam, à base de menaces de terreur, se déverse sur le judaïsme, moins « dangereux » et au plus bas de son prestige. Toute une gamme d’intellectuels juifs et de chercheurs est objectivement bannie de cette presse. On n’y rend compte ni de leurs travaux, ni de leurs interventions. La chose est réitérée depuis maintenant 10 ans au point que l’on se dise qu’il doit y avoir une liste noire qui écarte les auteurs non complaisants avec le discours de rigueur, le scénario des médias en matière juive. La chose est statistiquement démontrable, tant pour l’écrit que l’audio-visuel (les radios et TV publiques sont au sommet). L’atmosphère d’inimitié n’est pas le résultat d’une série de hasards.

Mais il y a aussi l’édition généraliste. Certes, elle est en crise en générale et le lectorat juif exigeant est très limité, en dessous du seuil de rentabilité commerciale pour une grande maison d’édition, mais les possibilités de publication de livres à thèmes judaïques (exceptée la marée en rapport avec la Shoah) se restreint de plus en plus. Il faut comparer, là aussi, avec le déluge éditorial concernant l’islam qui est le critère d’évaluation.

Ceci dit, ces dernières années a fleuri une littérature d’un genre très spécial qui dépeint pseudo critiquement le judaïsme comme religion, sous des traits conjuguant cruauté, violence et tromperie, parfois paganisme. La religion de l’Israël antique serait la source de toutes les violences, du génocide, de la haine de l’autre, de la cruauté sacrée. La semaine dernière, Le Point a publié 3 pages de plaidoyer de Michel Onfray pour défendre le cinquième livre (Qui est Dieu ?) d’une série très violente sur le judaïsme de Jean Soler où notamment il statue sur son côté sanguinaire et haineux. Michel Onfray cite une phrase de ce livre : « le nazisme de Mein Kampf est le modèle hébraïque auquel ne manque même pas Dieu » qui nous renseigne sur sa teneur.

La façon dont il prévient la remarque qui s’impose devant un tel discours montre bien la pirouette rhétorique la plus répandue pour exclure le point de vue juif : « l’accusation d’antisémitisme est celle qui accueille le plus souvent ses recherches. Elle est l’insulte la plus efficace pour discréditer le travail d’une vie et l’être même d’un homme ». Ainsi la boucle est bouclée entre ce que pense Al Djazira et ce que pense une certaine France : le « génocide de Gaza » était inscrit dans le judaïsme et l’État d’Israël est nazi.

Tant que les Juifs ne défendront pas leur honneur, tant qu’ils ne seront pas jaloux de leur réputation, on ne voit pas comment ni pourquoi cesserait leur maltraitance, leur rudoiement symbolique. Cette maltraitance est le premier pas vers le coup qu’on leur portera.

On ne peut se contenter de tirer cette seule leçon générale de la réalité. C’est ici aussi l’occasion de constater le degré de démission du judaïsme français face aux défis qui se pressent à son horizon. Ces questions devraient en premier lieu concerner le rabbinat français. Mais où sont les rabbins ? Où est le Grand Rabbin ? Il n’est pas possible que s’institue le partage entre ceux iraient toujours au charbon et ne récolteraient que la réprobation et ceux qui pontifieraient sur la scène de « l’éthique » et du politiquement correct.

Article additionnel (veuillez cliquer sur le titre pour accéder au lien) :

 

LE RETOUR HUMANITAIRE DE LA CROISADE
Shmuel Trigano

À partir d’une chronique sur Radio J, 1er juin 2012

 

 

THE ANSWER TO ANTISEMITISM, IN FRANCE AND EUROPE: JEWS, COME HOME!

The following is excerpted from an email written and circulated by a French Jew. It was published as an article, “One Day in the Life of a Jew in France,” in FrontPage Magazine on November 9, 2011.

“I am a Jew—therefore I am forwarding this to everyone on all my e-mail lists. I will not sit back and do nothing. Nowhere have the flames of anti-Semitism burned more furiously than in France: In Lyon, a car was rammed into a synagogue and set on fire. In Montpellier, the Jewish religious center was firebombed; so were synagogues in Strasbourg and Marseilles; so was a Jewish school in Creteil—all recently. A Jewish sports club in Toulouse was attacked with Molotov cocktails, and on the statue of Alfred Dreyfus in Paris, the words ‘Dirty Jew’ were painted. In Bondy, 15 men beat up members of a Jewish football team with sticks and metal bars. The bus that takes Jewish children to school in Aubervilliers has been attacked three times in the last 14 months.

According to the Police, metropolitan Paris has seen 10 to 12 anti-Jewish incidents PER DAY in the past 30 days. Walls in Jewish neighborhoods have been defaced with slogans proclaiming ‘Jews to the gas chambers’ and ‘Death to the Jews.’ A gunman opened fire on a kosher butcher’s shop (and, of course, the butcher) in Toulouse; a Jewish couple in their 20’s were beaten up by five men in Villeurbanne—the woman was pregnant; a Jewish school was broken into and vandalized in Sarcelles. This was just in the past week.

So I call on you, whether you are a fellow Jew, a friend, or merely a person with the capacity and desire to distinguish decency from depravity…to care enough to stay informed. Don’t ever let yourself become deluded into thinking that this is not your fight.… Please pass this on. Let’s not let history repeat itself.…”

PROTECTING FRANCE’S JEWS
Editorial

Jerusalem Post, March 19, 2012

…It is abundantly clear that the man who opened fire on schoolchildren and a teacher at the Ozar Hatorah school in Toulouse early Monday was out to kill Jews. The results were tragic: Yonatan Sandler, a 30-year-old teacher from Jerusalem; his two children Aryeh, 6, and Gavriel, 3; and Miriam Monsonego, 8, the daughter of Ozar Hatorah’s principal, are dead, and several others are wounded, one critically.

“For someone to locate this school in a place like Toulouse means he knew what he was doing,” said Gil Taieb, a vice president of CRIF, France’s Jewish umbrella group. “He went there to kill Jews.…”

Since late 2000, the Jews of France—who number about 500,000 and make up the third-largest Jewish community after Israel and the US—have been exposed to the most extensive outbreak of anti-Semitic violence since the Holocaust. The vast majority of hate crimes have been perpetrated by Arab immigrants protesting against perceived Israeli aggression against the Palestinians.

Acts of violence against Jews in France peaked again during and after Operation Cast Lead, the 22-day military incursion into the Gaza Strip to stop Hamas rocket fire against southern towns that began at the end of 2008. But extreme xenophobia and far-right extremism are additional factors undermining French Jews’ security.

France’s presidential election campaign, which is heating up ahead of the April 22 vote, has been marred with xenophobic elements that have not helped create a particularly welcoming atmosphere for Jews or Muslims. Earlier this month, French Prime Minister Francois Fillon, a member of President Nicolas Sarkozy’s Union for Popular Movement (UMP) party, publicly criticized ritual slaughter in an apparent attempt to curry favor among France’s right wing and take away votes from Marine Le Pen, the presidential candidate of the anti-immigration National Front.… The Union of French Jewish Students rightly noted that the statement “created suspicion with regards to Frenchmen who observe these religious rules.…”

Due to the rise of both Islamist and right-wing anti-Semitism, France’s Jews have grown increasingly uncomfortable. According to a survey by The Israel Project released in 2004, 26 percent of French Jews were contemplating emigration. In July 2004, then-prime minister Ariel Sharon urged French Jews to make aliya. (There are already an estimated 100,000 Jews of French origin in Israel.)

After Monday’s shooting at the Ozar Hatorah school, MK Yaakov Katz (National Union) reiterated calls for French Jews to come to Israel. France’s Jews, and the Jews of Europe in general, are acutely conscious of the threats they face. Jewish schools, synagogues and other easily identifiable Jewish institutions are under tight security. The attack in Toulouse will undoubtedly add to European Jews’ feeling of vulnerability.

But while aliya is an honorable and desirable act, it is not the only answer to European Jewry’s predicament. Inflammatory campaign rhetoric in France’s presidential elections must be toned down. The delegitimization of Israel should be aggressively combated. And above all, the security of Jews in France and elsewhere in Europe should be carefully guarded.

AFTER THE CARNAGE IN TOULOUSE,
TOGETHER AGAINST ANTI-SEMITISM
Bernard-Henri Lévy

Huffington Post, March 19, 2012

So France is a country where, in 2012, in the country’s third largest city, one can shoot at a Jewish school and kill, point blank, children there.…

Whatever we may learn about how the shooting that took place before the gates and then, as I understand it, inside the Ozar Hatorah lycée-collège played out, whatever link may be established with the mysterious murders of soldiers, last week, in Toulouse and in Montauban, the fact remains—and it is monstrous: French children, Jewish and French or, if one prefers, sovereignly French but guilty of having been born Jewish, were coldly gunned down, in broad daylight, on the territory of the Republic.

And then this corollary which is nearly as unbearable: we have returned to the dark times when we must “direct the prefects to reinforce surveillance around all confessional sites in France, and particularly around Jewish schools.” These are the terms of the French Ministry of the Interior’s communiqué Claude Guéant released a few minutes after the tragedy. It was inevitable, this communiqué. It was the very least the authorities, dismayed as we all were by the horror of the situation and taking the appropriate emergency measures, could do. But at the same time, these words make our blood run cold. And one trembles with shame and rage at the idea that, once again, we’re here, where we were after the attacks in the rue Copernic and in the rue des Rosiers and after the outburst of anti-Semitic acts at the beginning of the 2000s: pray, reflect, die, or simply study, under “reinforced police protection” and in the shelter of reconstituted “perimeters of security”—what an outrage!

Confronted with this abomination, then, and given the very specific moment at which this catastrophe has occurred, only one reaction is possible. I mean, while [France’s] campaign for presidential elections is in full swing and even, apparently, in its final phase, there is only one response that measures up to the event. Of course, indignation and fear. And yes, verbal condemnation, strong words, the symbolic appearances that are being announced as I write these lines.

Of course, the beau geste of candidate Hollande who, in homage to the victims, decided to unilaterally suspend his campaign and to devote the coming hours to a great moment of collective reflexion and mourning. Of course, the none less noble reaction of candidate Sarkozy, who speaks of a “national tragedy” and decrees, for his part, a moment of silence in all French schools in memory of these three children, aged 3, 6, and 8, and their teacher, massacred in cold blood by a professional killer.… But also a common action, or better still, an act of communion in which all candidates…forget for the moment all that opposes them and cry out with one voice (and, if possible, without political ulterior motives), their categorical rejection of anti-Semitism and its always criminal consequences.

A little over twenty years ago, the entire political class, all families together with the exception of the National Front, was capable of marching behind President François Mitterrand to condemn the profanation of 34 Jewish graves at a cemetery in Carpentras. Today, we need an equivalent of that demonstration, with Nicolas Sarkozy and François Hollande in the lead, in grieving Toulouse, at the Place Capitole, this landmark of national memory where General De Gaulle came, on September 16, 1945, to preach the unity of the country to the people of the maquis, FFI, FTP, and survivors of the International Brigades of the Spanish Civil War. A great, solemn meeting, all political forces attending, to come to say, without nuance, that all of France is being attacked and must take a united stand when its children, whatever they may be and whatever, I repeat, the profile of the killer or his reasons, are massacred like this.…

There can be no worse blow to French culture, to the soul of our country, its History and, when all is said and done, its grandeur than racism and, today, anti-Semitism.

(Bernard-Henri Lévy is a French philosopher and writer.)

ANATOMY OF A SLANDER:
EU OFFICIAL COMPARES TOULOUSE TO GAZA
Jonathan S. Tobin

Contentions, March 20, 2012

The after shocks of the terrorist attack at a Jewish school in Toulouse are still being felt as French authorities seek the person or persons responsible for the murder of three children and a teacher. But for the European Union’s foreign policy chief, this anti-Semitic atrocity was just grist for the rhetorical mill in her ongoing campaign against the state of Israel. Baroness Catherine Ashton used the occasion of a speech to a Palestinian group in Brussels to compare the deliberate targeting of Jewish children to recent events in Gaza.

The idea that there is any moral equivalence between a person stalking and killing kids in cold blood at a school and casualties incurred when the Israel Defense Force responds to missile attacks on other Jewish children in Southern Israel is an outrageous slander. It reflects the view of European elites that while the killing of Jews may be regrettable, the spectacle of other Jews defending themselves is inadmissible.

Ashton is now claiming she was misunderstood but even when you read her remarks in context they are damning: “When we remember young people who have been killed in all sorts of terrible circumstances…we think of what happened in Toulouse today, we remember what happened in Norway a year ago, we know what is happening in Syria, we see what is happening in Gaza.…”

Of course, the loss of all life is regrettable. One can certainly draw some sort of parallel between the Toulouse crime and the mass murder in Norway as well as the slaughter of civilians by the brutal Assad regime in Syria. But what has happened in Gaza is nothing like that.

The conflict in Gaza is the result of Israel’s total withdrawal from the territory in the hope of peace which led to the takeover of the strip by the Hamas terrorist group which, along with its Islamist competitors, now uses that area as a launching pad for missile attacks on Israeli territory. The Israeli army is forced to shoot back at the terrorists in order to suppress the fire and sometimes civilians are hurt since Hamas and the other groups use the people of Gaza as human shields. However, it should be noted that while 25 Palestinians were killed in the aftermath of the 200-missile barrage on Israel last week, virtually all were part of the terrorist groups launching the missiles. While the Palestinians claimed that the Israelis also killed a child, it turned out that the fatality was the result of Palestinian gunfire at a funeral for one of the terrorists.

During her tenure as the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Ashton, a Labor Party politician, has been a relentless critic of Israel while sparing the Palestinians and expressing neutrality about the prospect of Hamas joining the Palestinian Authority.

No matter which group carried out the Toulouse attack, it must be understood that the crime happened in an atmosphere in which the delegitimization of Israel by European elites has given some sanction for a new wave of anti-Semitism. Those who cannot condemn this crime without also attempting to draw a false analogy with Israeli actions are part of the problem, not the solution. Such canards are nothing less than a modern version of the medieval blood libel aimed at Jews.

JEWS, GET OUT OF EUROPE!
Giulio Meotti

Arutz Sheva, March 20, 2012

While the American Jewish intelligentsia discusses the legitimacy of an Israeli strike on Iran, European antiSemitism raises its head, leaving on the ground three Jewish children and a rabbi in Toulouse.

During the Holocaust, Jews were dispatched to the gas chambers (in France the local police did the “dirty work”). Seventy years later, in a modern, democratic Europe that presumably had shed itself of the legacy of that era, Jews have again come under attack. Witnesses of the Toulouse killing spree in the Jewish school tell of students hunted by the terrorist inside the building.… The terrorist aimed to slay Jews, only because they were Jews.

The school had absolutely nothing to do with “the occupation”, but has everything to do with the Jewish question.… The attack in Toulouse is the culmination of a long anti-Semitic campaign. Two weeks ago, Paris’ Interior Ministry released the statistics of the anti-Jewish wave: 389 anti-Semitic attacks—only—in 2011, at least one every day.

In 2006 Ilan Halimi was kidnapped in Paris by a group of young Muslims. He was tortured for four weeks while they read him pages of the Koran, and then thrown into a landfill to die, covered with mortal wounds. France is not an isolated case. Anti-Semitism in Western Europe is “the worst since World War II”, according to the Jewish Agency. It will only worsen in the future.

Books such as Mein Kampf and The Protocols of the Elders of Zion are prominently displayed bestsellers in Muslim stores on Edgware Road in the heart of London. In Sweden, a country described by The Guardian as “the greatest success the world has known,” Jews are leaving large cities such as Malmö due to security reasons, in order to escape anti-Semitic attacks. The Netherlands, which was once the shelter for the Spanish and Portuguese Jews who fled the 15th century Inquisition, is now a realm of fear, intimidation and subjugation. Jews are fleeing Antwerp, the city once proudly called “the Northern Jerusalem.…”

Always the same target: the Jewish people and the State of Israel, which the late French ambassador Daniel Bernard called “ce petit pays de merde”—that shitty little country.

Jewish life in France and Europe is not under question, it’s already history. For as comfortable as life might be in the arrondissements of Paris, it is time for the Jews of France to come home. Before it’s too late, they should leave for Israel.…

Anti-Semitism is an eruption of barbarism in our civilization and the Jews have always been a barometer of tolerance. Europe is living its new nightmare and classical anti-Semitism has become a potent and dangerous mix in countries with enormous Muslim populations. We will not be surprised if one day, under the Eurabian banner, these new Europeans will try to expel the descendants of the Holocaust from the land of Israel.

This second Shoah will be called “Peace and Justice for Palestine.”