Tag: CIJR

SYRIAN CIVIL WAR CONTINUES, DESPITE “CEASE-FIRE”, AS ISRAEL MONITORS EXPLOSIVE NORTHERN BORDER

The Bombing of an Aleppo Hospital Should Spur the U.S. to Change its Policy in Syria: Washington Post, Apr. 29, 2016— The devastating bombing of an Aleppo hospital on Wednesday night — which killed at least 50 civilians, including six medical staff and a number of children — was not an accident, and it should not have been a surprise to promoters of the Syrian “cease-fire.”

Syria – a War Waiting to Spill Over: Yaakov Lappin, Jerusalem Post, May 2, 2016— Last Wednesday, during the middle of the tranquil Passover vacation, IDF Chief of Staff Lt.-Gen. Gadi Eisenkot headed north.

The Syrian Civil War: An Interim Balance Sheet: Prof. Efraim Inbar, BESA, Apr. 6, 2016— Intensified diplomatic efforts by the international community to put an end to the civil war in Syria are unlikely to reach a political long-term arrangement before the warring parties are exhausted by the conflict.

Canadian Institute Places Israel’s Space Program at the Center of its Universe: Bradley Martin, JNS, May 1, 2016— “Do you remember when Leonard Nimoy said, ‘Live long and prosper?’” Dr. Frederick Krantz asked an audience at the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue of Montreal.

 

On Topic Links

 

Lebanizing Syria: Gary C. Gambill, The Hill, Apr. 30, 2016

Where ISIL Came From (and Where it’s Going Next): Robert Fulford, National Post, Apr. 22, 2016

The Syrian Quagmire: Andrew J. Tabler, Middle East Forum, Apr. 12, 2016

Obama’s Biggest Mistake Isn’t Libya. It’s Syria.: Josh Rogin, Bloomberg, Apr, 11, 2016

 

 

THE BOMBING OF AN ALEPPO HOSPITAL SHOULD SPUR

THE U.S. TO CHANGE ITS POLICY IN SYRIA

Washington Post, Apr. 29, 2016

 

The devastating bombing of an Aleppo hospital on Wednesday night — which killed at least 50 civilians, including six medical staff and a number of children — was not an accident, and it should not have been a surprise to promoters of the Syrian “cease-fire.” For weeks the regime of Bashar al-Assad has been proclaiming its intention to recapture the rebel-held eastern side of Aleppo, with help from “our Russian partners,” as the prime minister put it. The bombing of hospitals and food markets, in turn, is a standard component of Mr. Assad’s military campaigns, intended to drive civilians out of rebel-held areas.

 

By Saturday, the Aleppo offensive was in its ninth day; according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, 226 civilians had been killed by bombing and shelling through Friday, including 50 women and children. Yet U.S. and U.N. officials were still clinging to the fiction that the “cessation of hostilities” they said began on Feb. 27, and which the Assad regime never fully observed, was still somehow alive. “I think we would still maintain that it had largely held,” State Department spokesman John Kirby said Thursday, as rescuers pulled children from the ruins of the hospital’s pediatric ward.

 

U.S. policy in Syria has devolved into a sickening routine. Secretary of State John F. Kerry negotiates with Russia on steps to end the violence, while insisting that the United States will turn to a “Plan B” if they fail. Russia and the Syrian regime then make a mockery of the agreements, continuing to bomb civilians and attack Western-backed rebels. Mr. Kerry duly denounces the atrocities, as he did on Thursday, when he pronounced himself “outraged” by the “deliberate strike on a known medical facility.”

 

Then, forgetting his previous talk of a Plan B, Mr. Kerry returns to the Russians with another appeal for cooperation. That’s what happened after the hospital bombing: The State Department recommitted to the “political process,” according to Mr. Kirby, who went so far as to describe Plan B as “mythical.” On Friday, a new, partial cease-fire was announced, beginning Saturday in the Damascus suburbs and the coastal area of Latakia. Aleppo, where the regime’s offensive is taking place, was excluded.

 

In fact, there does appear to be a U.S. Plan B, according to the Wall Street Journal, which recently reported that it involved supplying more powerful weapons to the Syrian rebels, possibly including missiles that could shoot down Syrian planes and helicopters. It has been widely reported that Mr. Kerry himself has lobbied for more aid to the rebels as a way of gaining leverage over the Assad regime and Russia. And yet action has been held up, as throughout the Syrian civil war, by President Obama, who, fearing U.S. intervention will make the situation worse, rejects any steps that could make it better.

 

The latest atrocities should prompt Mr. Obama to reconsider. Measures to strengthen the rebels, and ground the government’s air force, are not only the morally right response to the deliberate bombing of hospitals and food stores. Pragmatically, they offer the only way to force the Assad regime and its allies to negotiate seriously about Syria’s future. The president still has the chance to mitigate his past mistakes and create a path toward peace in Syria. He should seize it.    

 

                                                             

Contents

SYRIA – A WAR WAITING TO SPILL OVER

Yaakov Lappin                                          

Jerusalem Post, May 2, 2016

Last Wednesday, during the middle of the tranquil Passover vacation, IDF Chief of Staff Lt.-Gen. Gadi Eisenkot headed north. The military had imposed a temporary closure on the West Bank, and all was quiet on the Gazan and Lebanese fronts. Eisenkot took the opportunity to visit the 91st Division, which secures the Galilee, and toured Mount Dov (Shaba Farms), which looks out over Lebanon and Syria.

 

Of all the sectors the IDF monitors carefully, it is Syria that is the most unpredictable and explosive, and which carries the biggest potential for a sudden escalation. Additionally, due to Hezbollah’s attempts to traffic weapons from Syria to Lebanon, and its ongoing fight against anti-Assad rebel groups, events in Syria have a direct impact on the Lebanese front.

 

Just over the Israeli border, in southern Syria, a myriad of heavily armed radical Sunni and Shi’ite factions continue to battle it out, in a zerosum game of kill or be killed. Al-Qaida wages war on other Sunni jihadists in ISIS, and both are engaged in a fight to the death against the Alawite regime in Damascus and its Shi’ite backers – Hezbollah and Iran’s Revolutionary Guards Corps. Above them, fighter jets belonging to international coalitions carry out air strikes in crowded skies, and Israel, according to foreign reports, periodically targets weapons-smuggling runs seeking to bring strategic arms to Hezbollah’s depots in Lebanon.

 

The sectarian warfare that has torn Syria to pieces is unlikely to recede any time soon, and international efforts toward a cease-fire – however well intentioned – appear tragically ill-fated. Syria, along with Libya, Yemen and Iraq, represents the breakdown of the 20th-century Middle East order. This chain reaction of implosions looks permanent, bringing along with it a high possibility of affecting additional countries over time.

 

The Assad regime’s murderous bombing raids on Aleppo, which have killed over 220 people since April 22, testify to the trajectory in which failed states are moving. As civil wars rage, vacuums of power are filled by the rise of radical Sunni organizations, while the displacement of millions of Syrians continues. The developments are accompanied by the breakdown of any semblance of a national identity, in favor of competing sectarian groups.

 

The concept of the Arab nation-state has never appeared weaker, placing significant strain on the Arab countries in the area that have remained intact. In the new Middle East, it is apparent that sub-state jihadist organizations, not state armies, are the most immediate threat to Israeli security. The old borders have lost meaning. ISIS and al-Qaida in Syria and Sinai, Hezbollah in Syria and Lebanon, and Hamas in Gaza all qualify as modern exemplars of transnational foes.

 

Israel, like the pragmatic Sunni states that have so far weathered the Arab winter, is preparing for the day that terrorists combating one another in Syria direct their guns and missiles toward new targets.

 

Contents

THE SYRIAN CIVIL WAR: AN INTERIM BALANCE SHEET

Prof. Efraim Inbar                                                                   

BESA, Apr. 6, 2016

 

Intensified diplomatic efforts by the international community to put an end to the civil war in Syria are unlikely to reach a political long-term arrangement before the warring parties are exhausted by the conflict. It is often weariness that brings armed conflicts to a close, rather than a promising political solution offered by a disinterested mediator or international conference

.

Significantly, no protagonist seems to have overwhelming power to enforce its preferred solution. The Sunni powers, such as Saudi Arabia and Turkey, tried to unseat Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, the ally of Shiite Iran, but displayed weakness that was exploited by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards and Hezbollah. Even American aid to the Sunni rebels was ineffective. The much feared Islamic State (IS), born as a result of the disintegration of Iraq and Syria, was not strong enough to tackle the Assad regime successfully. The Russian military intervention was able to strengthen Assad's grip over parts of Syria, but was not enough to restore his rule over the entire country.

 

This means that Syria will remain divided among several warring factions for some time to come. The fractured country will continue to be an arena in which local chiefs will try to expand their areas of control and in which outsiders will compete for influence. Fluidity and ambiguity will continue to characterize the arena.

 

This equivocal situation is producing winners and losers, but it is Iran that is emerging with the upper hand. Assad is still in power, which means Tehran retains its clout in Damascus, a former capital of an Arab empire. Damascus is also the linchpin to Beirut, where the Shiite Hezbollah, an Iranian proxy, exercises effective power. Moreover, the Syrian crisis has amplified the threat perception of IS in the West, making Iran a potential ally in western attempts to curb radical Sunni Islamists. Such perceptions also help Iran strengthen its control over Iraq. Iran has been successful in preserving the Shiite corridor, a key objective in its quest for hegemony in the Middle East and for projecting force further away.

 

Russia emerged as a beneficiary of the lingering Syrian crisis even before its military intervention in September 2015. It was successful in providing the diplomatic mechanism that enabled Obama to renege on his ultimatum against Assad’s use of chemical weapons, and has effectively defended the Assad regime at international fora. The Russian intervention on Assad's behalf also signaled that Moscow is a reliable ally, a message that resonates well among the political elites of the Middle East and beyond.

 

In addition, Russia preserved its strategic assets on the Syrian coast in the eastern Mediterranean after investing for years in the build-up of its Mediterranean flotilla. Russia, a large energy producer with global interests, has also maintained the exploration rights to the potential gas findings along the Syrian coast—a part of the rich Levant Basin.

In contrast, the Syrian turmoil provided plenty of proof that the US, under Obama, is not adept at dealing with Middle East realities. One early example was the Obama administration's initial inclination to try to engage foes, such as Syria (and Iran). A defining moment of American weakness was the retreat from threats to use force against Assad for crossing the chemical weapons red line (August 2012).

 

The American campaign against IS has provided additional evidence about the retreat of American power in the Middle East. In August 2014, after a confused and long decision-making process, the US concluded that the territorial conquests of IS are evolving into a significant threat to American interests and ordered its air force to raid installations of IS in Syria (and Iraq). Unfortunately, the gap between the goals and the capabilities of the US and its allies bolstered IS's dual message about the weakness of the decadent West and its own invincibility. By the beginning of 2016, the war against IS appeared stalemated. The US failed to induce local actors to cooperate effectively against it, and the limited air campaign has been insufficient.

 

In contrast, it was Russian air support that secured a victory for Assad against IS (the March 2016 conquest of Palmyra). The Russian intervention underscored American passivity even as it elicited dismissive statements by Obama, who called it a quagmire for Russian forces and absolved himself of the need to take any action. Obama did not specify how he would respond to Russian aircraft targeting US-supported rebel factions in the civil war other than to underline that the US would not directly confront Moscow. The tacit expectation that Syria would turn into a Vietnam or Afghanistan experience for Russia turned out to be unfounded.

 

Turkey appears to be at a loss after several years of futile support for Syrian rebels. The destabilization of Syria has underscored Turkey's long porous border, which exposes the country to terrorist attacks. At the same time, the influx of a multitude of refugees fleeing the mayhem has exacted an economic price on Ankara. Turkey’s crucial support for IS has been gradually revealed, the full diplomatic cost of which remains to be seen.

 

While Turkey has shown itself ready to confront Iran by proxies in Syria, underscoring the Sunni-Shiite fault lines and the regional Persian-Turkish rivalry, that readiness may well precipitate Iranian support for Kurdish militias, which constitutes a national security threat. Turkey also miscalculated in November 2015 by shooting down a Russian fighter, an action that triggered a deterioration in Turkey's strategic position by reviving the Ottoman-Russian historical enmity.

 

In addition, Turkey's Syrian policy has had the unintended consequence of empowering the most virulently anti-Turkish Kurdish elements. These Kurds have achieved a measure of autonomy in several regions in northern Syria, and have earned some Western support thanks to their effectiveness against IS. Still, the limited self-rule the Kurds have established, and the international attention they have attracted to their cause, will not be enough for state-building. For them to achieve full autonomy, they will have to overcome internal discord and their lack of territorial contiguity.

 

Israel continues to be a spectator as the Syrian tragedy unfolds, with occasional pinpoint interventions when immediate national security interests are at stake. The disappearance of the Syrian military threat to Israel is not, of course, inimical to its interests. But the entrenchment of Iran in Damascus, with substantial Russian help, constitutes a critical national security threat to Israel, because it strengthens the radical axis led by Iran in a Middle East from which the US has largely retreated. The possibility of opening a new front on the Golan Heights is a secondary issue that also needs the attention of the Israeli military.

 

The Syrian arena provides Israel with diplomatic opportunities to nourish relationships with reluctant actors. Jerusalem must work under the assumption that Syria cannot easily be fixed and that conflict is likely to continue. Israel’s interactions within its strategic environment are inherently limited. The use of force, often inevitable in our neighborhood, must be carefully calibrated in light of domestic and international constraints.                                                                                   

 

Contents

CANADIAN INSTITUTE PLACES ISRAEL’S SPACE

PROGRAM AT THE CENTER OF ITS UNIVERSE

Bradley Martin                                                               

JNS, May 1, 2016

 

“Do you remember when Leonard Nimoy said, ‘Live long and prosper?’” Dr. Frederick Krantz asked an audience at the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue of Montreal. Listeners chuckled in approval of his “Star Trek” reference, indicating that a large percentage were familiar with the iconic TV series and had fond memories of the late Canadian-Jewish actor. Krantz continued, “Well, that is very true. Israel is not only a power in the Middle East, but will be a power in space.”

 

The Canadian Institute for Jewish Research (CIJR) on April 14 held its 28th anniversary gala, an event titled “Israel in Space.” It was North America’s largest-ever gathering dedicated to Israel’s space exploration achievements, with an estimated 200 attendees, according to Krantz. “My hope is that knowledge of Israel’s space program will show what a benefit the Jewish state is for mankind,” said Krantz, the director of CIJR.

 

The conference not only showcased Israel’s growing contributions to space exploration, but it was also a night dedicated in memory of the late Israeli astronaut Ilan Ramon, who died in 2003 on the fatal mission of the Columbia space shuttle.

 

“I can’t quite see it right now, but there is a relationship between human space flight and peace in the Middle East,” Ramon once told his friend, former Canadian Space Agency president Steve MacLean. “When I get back, I am going to focus on that.”

 

The keynote address was given by Tal Inbar, head of Space & UAV Studies at The Fisher Institute for Air and Space Strategic Studies, which was founded by the Israel Air Force Association. Inbar recounted how Israel embarked on a national space program in order to monitor Egyptian military movements via satellite. This was done after the Israeli withdrawal from the Sinai Peninsula, in order to ensure that Egypt was honoring its commitments as outlined in the 1979 Israel-Egypt peace treaty. Inbar said that this technological edge is even more important now, in order to monitor the activity of Iran, and that Israel needs to maintain its superiority in ballistic missile technology.

 

“Israel is, to put it politely, geographically challenged by its neighbors,” said Inbar, outlining the barriers to Israeli space ventures. “So, we are the only nation in the world that launches its satellites in the wrong direction! While everyone else launches their rockets eastwards, with the Earth’s rotation, we have to launch west in order to avoid our rockets being shot down. So, we lose about one-third of the lifting capability of out launched vehicles.”

 

“Israel is home to the only launch facility that is next to an active nuclear research center, two major cities, and a port with large deposits of oil. It is also within range of rockets from Gaza,” Inbar added in reference to Palmachim, an Israeli military base and spaceport located near the Mediterranean.

 

Despite these geopolitical obstacles, Israel’s contributions to space exploration technology have been noted throughout the world. It was announced in February 2016 that the Israel Space Agency would become an official member of the United Nations Committee on Space Affairs. In October 2015, the U.N. accepted Israel into its prestigious Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, an accord that is expected to allow Israeli experts to influence significant global projects, such as using satellites in real-time to aid rescue teams during disasters.

 

Israel currently has 15 civilian satellites orbiting the Earth, two-thirds of which are communication devices, with the remainder being communication platforms. Israel is reportedly the smallest country in the world to launch its own satellites. It is also one of only 11 nations with the ability to independently launch unmanned missions into space.

 

Israeli advancements in space technology have also played a critical role in the ongoing exploration of Mars. Developed by Siemens in Israel, the Product Lifestyle Management software that enabled NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratories to accurately model the performance of the Curiosity rover has been integral in determining whether life ever arose on Mars, as well as preparing the “red planet” for future human exploration.

 

Bradley Martin is a CIJR Student Intern. CIJR’s 28th Annual Gala also took place in Toronto on

April 12, 2016 and featured keynote speaker Tal Inbar. Toronto CIJR office co-chair David Sherman,

& his wife Simone, were honoured with the 2016 “Lion of Judah” award—Ed.

 

On Topic Links

 

Lebanizing Syria: Gary C. Gambill, The Hill, Apr. 30, 2016—After months of what the New York Times called "obsession" on the part of America's top diplomat, Secretary of State John Kerry has brokered an understanding that is dramatically reducing violence on most fronts in the Syrian civil war, while declaring open season on ISIS and the al-Qaeda-affiliated Nusra Front.

Where ISIL Came From (and Where it’s Going Next): Robert Fulford, National Post, Apr. 22, 2016—In June, 2014, Barack Obama dismissed the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) as the terrorist equivalent of a junior varsity basketball team. He remarked that “If a j.v. team puts on Lakers uniforms, that doesn’t make them Kobe Bryant.” In other words, nothing there for Americans to worry about.

The Syrian Quagmire: Andrew J. Tabler, Middle East Forum, Apr. 12, 2016—It is not yet clear whether and to what extent the partial drawdown of Russian forces from Syria will affect the course of the Syrian civil war.

Obama’s Biggest Mistake Isn’t Libya. It’s Syria.: Josh Rogin, Bloomberg, Apr, 11, 2016 —President Barack Obama said Sunday that his biggest mistake as president was failing to plan for the day after the fall of the Qaddafi regime in Libya. But as bad as Libya looks today, Syria is faring far worse, in part because of the Obama administration’s failings — which the president has not yet acknowledged.

 

                    

 

 

 

                  

 

 

 

CIJR – 25 YEARS FIGHTING FOR THE JEWISH PEOPLE & COMBATING ANTISEMITISM ON CAMPUS – 2

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Ber Lazarus, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 – Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284; E-mail:  ber@isranet.org

 

 

 Download a pdf version of today's Daily Briefing.

 

Contents:

 

UN Watch Blasts UN Rapporteur Falk After He Demands “Investigation: Hillel Neuer, UN Watch, June 10, 2013
Testimony delivered by UN Watch executive director Hillel Neuer, UN Human Rights Council’s “Interactive Dialogue with Special Rapporteur Richard Falk,” June 10, 2013.

 

Parliament Of Canada Stands by UN Watch: Jason Kenny, You Tube, June 12, 2013The Canadian Parliament rose [June 12] for a standing ovation in support of UN Watch, as Jason Kenny, Canada's Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism, called on the UN to fire Mr. Falk.

 

Sean Wilson: CIJR’S 25th Anniversary – “Student Of The Year”: Frederick Krantz, June 18, 2013 — Sean, a product of Harvest City Christian College and City Christian High School in Regina, was put off by the aggressive, anti-Israel IAW propaganda. Having sought, initially,  unsuccessfully to block Student Council pro-Palestinian motions,   determined to succeed, he returned enthused about Israel and the Jewish state after a CIJA Young Leaders’ Israel visit program.

 

Canada and Israel — best friends forever?: Raphael Ahren, Times of Israel, May 19, 2013—On November 28, 2012, one day before the United Nations General Assembly voted to upgrade Palestine to a nonmember state, a few Palestinian protesters gathered in front of the Canadian representative offices in Ramallah.

 

In Canada, Teaching Zionism, One Student At A Time: Alexandra Markus, Israel Campus Beat, February 11, 2013—Five years ago, Concordia University professor Frederick Krantz noticed a lack of preparedness among Jewish students when faced with the growing anti-Zionist fervor he witnessed on his campus.

 

The First Isranet Daily Briefing : Arafat's War: by Charles Krauthammer, Published in The Washington Post, October 6, 2000 —  Fighting has broken out in the Middle East, we read. This use of passive phrasing, almost universal in media reports on the violence in Israel, is a way of deliberately expressing agnosticism about the cause of the fighting. It is a scandal.

 

 

UN WATCH BLASTS UN RAPPORTEUR FALK
AFTER HE DEMANDS “INVESTIGATION”
Hillel Neuer

UN Watch, June 10, 2013
 

Testimony delivered by UN Watch executive director Hillel Neuer, UN Human Rights Council’s “Interactive Dialogue with Special Rapporteur Richard Falk,” June 10, 2013.

Mr. Falk, in the first page of your report, you attack my NGO and ask this Council to launch an investigation in order to shut us down. Does your report allege a crime? No, you simply object to our words. We are the only watchdog at the UN, and we report what you say. In reprisal, you now seek to muzzle our voice, to avoid being held accountable. The real issue is whether your work, conducted under the banner of human rights, actually exonerates and exculpates the perpetrators of terrorism.

Exhibit A, which I am holding up, is this book by David Ray Griffin, the bible for those who blame America, instead of Al Qaeda, for the 9/11 attacks. Do you deny that this is your name on the front cover, praising the author’s “fortitude,” “courage,” and “intelligence”? Do you understand why Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, appearing in this room in January 2011, delivered an unprecedented condemnation of a UN expert, when he called your remarks, quote: “preposterous, and an affront to the memory of the more than 3,000 people who died in that tragic terrorist attack”?

Exhibit B: “The Wandering Who,” a book condemned as antisemitic even by your own top supporter, Ali Abunimah of the Electronic Intifada. Do you deny that, once again, this is your name on the front cover, endorsing it?  Do you understand why the British Foreign Office has officially accused you of racism, on multiple occasions?

Exhibit C:  Your article of two months ago, blaming the Boston terrorist attack—which left more than 300 dead and grievously wounded—on, quote “the American global domination project and “Tel Aviv.” Do you deny justifying the attacks as a form, of quote, “resistance”?Do you understand why the Secretary-General announced that he rejected your comments, saying they, quote, “undermine the credibility and the work of the United Nations”? And why this condemnation was echoed by Britain, Canada, the U.S., and many others? When we recently brought all of this to the attention of Human Rights Watch, within 24 hours they removed you from their committee. Finally, according to a cable revealed by Wikileaks, on February 16, 2009, the Palestinian delegate to this council complained to his US counterpart about your support for Hamas, saying that “he had called Falk personally and asked him to step down, something Falk angrily rejected.”

So, Mr. Falk, please feel free to investigate us — and to investigate the UN Secretary-General; Britain; Canada; the U.S.; Human Rights Watch; and the State of Palestine. 

 

 

PARLIAMENT OF CANADA
Youtube, June 12, 2013
 

The Canadian Parliament rose [June 12] for a standing ovation in support of UN Watch, as Jason Kenny, Canada's Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism, called on the UN to fire Mr. Falk.
Watch here.

 

Mr. Larry Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, CPC): “Mr. Speaker, Richard Falk has once again disgraced himself. Will the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Mr. Falk is once again attacking UN Watch, an NGO led by Canadian Hillel Neuer, and called for it to be investigated. This is McCarthyism in the worse sense of the term. inform the House whether the government agrees with Mr. Falk or not?”

Hon. Jason Kenney (Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism, CPC):Mr. Speaker, Richard Falk is an embarrassment to the United Nations Human Rights Council. He has praised 9/11 conspiracy theorists repeatedly. He has suggested that the United States provoked terrorist attacks against it. He is now attacking Canadian-led UN Watch. We call on Richard Falk to be fired as a special rapporteur of the United Nations Human Rights Council. He is a disgrace to that body and the United Nations.”

 

Top of Page

 

 

SEAN WILSON: CIJR’S 25th ANNIVERSARY

“STUDENT OF THE YEAR

Frederick Krantz, June 18, 2013

 

We are delighted to have been able to make Sean Wilson, from Regina U., CIJR’s Student of the Year, and to have brought him to Montreal, and to Toronto, to participate in our 25th Anniversary Gala Program.

   An Economics-Business major, with a minor in Political Science, Sean single-handedly handled the anti-Israel “Israeli Apartheid Week” forces at Regina a Campus defeat, the first across Canada.

    Sean,  a product of Harvest City Christian College and City Christian High School in Regina, was put off by the aggressive, anti-Israel IAW propaganda. Having sought, initially,  unsuccessfully to block Student Council pro-Palestinian motions,   determined to succeed, he returned enthused about Israel and the Jewish state after a CIJA Young Leaders’ Israel visit program.

    Sean again took on the anti-Israel, pro-Palestinian Student Union “BDS” (“Boycott, Disinvest, Sanction [Israel]”) forces at Regina, and this time —persistently organizing the student body—he succeeded, by a large margin,150-70,  in defeating them, in a  Student Council vote refusing to authorize IAW’s presence, and any BDS measures, on campus.

    It is crucial to note that what Sean Wilson achieved was the first such victory for Israel on a Canadian campus, one which must be studied and made known in order tlo encourage similar movements on other campuses.

    As Sean observes, although he was threatened by disgruntled IAWers, “I will not be quiet about speaking up on what I believe is right. I was once told to ‘play it safe’ unless ‘I find a hill I am willing to die on’. Well, democratic Jewish Israel is one ‘hill’ I am always ready to defend.”

   The phrase echoes JFK’s famous 1961 Boston State House invocation of Jerusalem as “the city upon a hill”, that in defense of liberty “the eyes of all people are upon us”.  The eyes of the Jewish People are, insofar as the well-being of our students, Jewish and non-Jewish, on campus is concerned, are indeed upon us—and Sean Wilson’s shining example is leading the way.

(Prof. Krantz, Director of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research,  is Editor of the Isranet Daily Briefing).

 

Top of Page

 

CANADA AND ISRAEL — BEST FRIENDS FOREVER?

Raphael Ahren

Times of Israel, May 19, 2013

 

On November 28, 2012, one day before the United Nations General Assembly voted to upgrade Palestine to a nonmember state, a few Palestinian protesters gathered in front of the Canadian representative offices in Ramallah. They were holding posters saying “Shame on You, Canada,” and other slogans accusing the country of being a “subcontractor of apartheid.” Many demonstrators also held up banners showing a photo of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, superimposed with a face of a dog, next to the slogan “This dog doesn’t hunt.”

 

Of course that didn’t change Ottawa’s determination: Canada voted against the Palestinian statehood bid, one of only nine countries to do so (138 nations voted in favor and 41 abstained.) Canada has always been a friend of the Jewish state, but in recent years — especially since the Harper government came to power in 2006 — Ottawa has redefined what it means to be staunchly pro-Israel. Indeed, in the Middle East conflict, no other nation, not even the United States, has been so unstintingly supportive of the policies of Israel’s government as the Great White North.

 

The UN vote was just one of many examples when Canada stood up for Israel, and against much of the world consensus. Just this Thursday, Harper rebuked the world for its stance on what he called the “one stable, democratic” country in the Middle East. “There’s nothing more short sighted in Western capitals in our time than the softening of support we’ve seen for Israel around the globe,” he said during a visit in New York.

Which begs the question: why? What is in it for Canada?

 

It has been argued, not unconvincingly, that the world’s second-largest country’s determined support for the world’s 153rd-largest country has cost Ottawa dearly in terms of influence on the international stage. Yet the support doesn’t falter. Could it be that Canada’s vast oil and gas reserves make it less dependent on resources from the Arab world, allowing the government to do what it pleases, as opposed to, say, oil-devoid European countries?

 

Or, perhaps even more important, would this uncompromising support for Israel disappear were Harper’s Conservative Party to lose power, as polls indicate it could in 2015? Canadian officials like to explain their government’s diehard friendship to Israel by pointing out that the two countries share many common values. “I would characterize the position as one of moral clarity,” Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Joe Oliver told The Times of Israel earlier this month in Jerusalem. “If there’s a conflict between a democratic ally and terrorist groups that want to destroy it, we don’t see grays. The moral relativism that is sometimes a big factor is not what guides us. We think it’s important for countries to walk the walk as well as talking the talk.”

 

But other Western countries also don’t love terrorism but still criticize Israel, for example over settlement expansions. “We have said that unilateral action on either side isn’t particularly helpful,” the minister responded, emphasizing that Canada doesn’t support the settlements. “I don’t know what else to say in this regard. There’s willingness on our part to demonstrate moral leadership.”

 

Oliver then quickly added that he doesn’t mean to say Canada is more moral than other countries. But, he said, “when you confront a situation like one sees at the United Nations constantly, where Israel is singled out for special criticism to the exclusion of massive abuses in all parts of the world… it’s very obvious you’re dealing with double standards. And when the victim is portrayed as the perpetrator and the perpetrator as the victim, this is not something we want to be associated with.”

 

Canada’s support for Israel — and opposition to Israel’s enemies — doesn’t only play out at the General Assembly. In 2008, Canada was the first country to boycott the Durban Review Conference against racism because it anticipated, correctly, that the conference would turn into an anti-Israel hate fest. In September 2012, Canada severed diplomatic relations with Iran. Foreign Minister John Baird explained the move, by saying the regime in Tehran, among other things, “routinely threatens the existence of Israel.” When Jerusalem punished the Palestinians for the statehood bid by announcing to build homes in the controversial E1 corridor east of Jerusalem, the whole world forcefully condemned the plans. Except the Canadians: the government merely noted that such steps aren’t “helpful.”

 

Last month, however, marked a high point in Canada’s pro-Israel (and ostensibly anti-Palestinian) moves, when Foreign Minister John Baird visited Israel’s justice minister, Tzipi Livni, in her East Jerusalem office. Since the international community doesn’t accept Israel’s annexation of the eastern part of the city, foreign diplomats usually refuse to meet Israeli officials there lest it be interpreted as a tacit recognition of Israeli sovereignty.

 

“Either he’s ignorant of east Jerusalem being occupied territory, which is unforgivable in a foreign minister, or it’s a deliberate attempt to change the international consensus,” fumed Hanan Ashrawi, a spokesperson for the Palestine Liberation Organization. Baird tried to play down the issue, saying that where he “had coffee with Tzipi Livni is, I think, irrelevant [and] doesn’t signal a change in Canadian foreign policy.” Until relatively recently, Ottawa’s unequivocal support for Israel did not seem to have damaged its ties to the Arab world. But this is changing.

 

In 2010, Canada lost its bid to gain one of the non-permanent seats on the UN Security Council for the first time since 1945. Many observers, including Harper himself, linked the defeat in part to Ottawa’s support for Israel. Earlier this month, some Arab nations tried to push for the relocation of the UN-affiliated International Civil Aviation Organization, from Montreal, where it has been headquartered since 1947, to Qatar. This move should be seen as the “combined efforts to strike back at Canada for its stand on Palestinian issues,” the country’s Globe and Mail newspaper wrote. And Baird’s East Jerusalem meeting broke the camel’s back, claimed Michael Bell, a former Canadian ambassador to Israel and the Palestinian territories….

 

…Canadian politicians from both sides of the aisle continue to refute the notion that support for Israel is costing the country dearly on the international stage. “The argument is made that we could have more influence in the Middle East if we got on the Security Council. Is the recommendation that we should have been anti-Israeli in order to get on the Security Council so we could be pro-Israeli?” Oliver, the natural resources minister, said laughingly. “We’re willing to make the sacrifices necessary to stand up for what we believe. Sometimes there’s a price to pay. Does it reduce our influence in the world or does it increase it? That’s something one can debate.”

 

Personally, Oliver actually believes that Canada’s global influence “has been enhanced” by the government’s principled stance. So far, he said, no Arab country has refused to do business with his government because of Israel. “They’re selling their oil to people who want to buy it,” he said. Canada’s vast reserves of natural resources, some analysts believe, allow the government to irritate the Arabs because it doesn’t depend on their oil. “Canada has its own oil and so it doesn’t really need oil from Arabia,” said Israeli-Canadian journalist David Sheen. “Even without Canada on the Security Council, Canadian mining companies aren’t having any problems getting what they want. So Canada hasn’t really had to pay any price for its Israel policy.”….

 

Top of Page

 

 

IN CANADA, TEACHING ZIONISM, ONE STUDENT AT A TIME
Alexandra Markus

Israel Campus Beat, February 11, 2013

 

Five years ago, Concordia University professor Frederick Krantz noticed a lack of preparedness among Jewish students when faced with the growing anti-Zionist fervor he witnessed on his campus. “Zionism was becoming a negative term and we at the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research (CIJR) wanted to do something about it,” he said, “so we started the Student Israel Advocacy Program (SIAP), a year-long seminar with college faculty for the public, to give them facts and data about Jewish and Zionist history, the Arab-Israel conflict and the rise in propaganda.”

 

Krantz, a professor of liberal arts and humanities who completed his PhD at Yeshiva University on the history of anti-Semitism, is the director of CIJR, a 25-year-old organization that is connected with the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. The SIAP is one of its many outreach projects.

 

“Frequently, Jewish students, even those who went to Jewish schools, don’t know much history of the Arab-Israeli conflict, so when they are confronted with highly propagandistic Arab students, professors and speakers, they are not prepared,” Krantz noted. SIAP aims to change that by building upon participants’ knowledge of Jewish and Middle East history, their rhetorical skills and their ability to debate and organize on campus, through seminars and workshops. The program stresses the importance of mutual support among Israel supporters.

 

“Our overarching goal is to provide students with the truth about the history of the conflict, facts that allow them to dispute the assertions which are made on campus,” Krantz said, adding, “we try to not only teach these skills, but provide participants with the psychological confidence to put them to good use.”

 

Faculty from three of Montreal’s four universities work together to lead seven workshops each year. Enrolment in the program largely consists of college and university students, but a small contingent of older participants also enrols each year. Generally, 15-20 people complete the program annually. Krantz estimated that approximately 40% of program participants are non-Jewish: “Some of these non-Jewish kids become the most sincerely committed Zionists in the groups we have educated over the years, which has been very satisfying for us,” he said.

 

Laura Ariza Pena Corea, 24, who studies public policy at Concordia University and is not Jewish, completed the program two years ago. She hails from Colombia, a predominantly Catholic country with a small Jewish population. “When I came here, I made some Jewish friends and expressed an interest in learning more about the history and culture, so I was referred to the program,” she explained.

 

Krantz emphasized that the program aims to impart facts rather than opinions, giving participants enough background and history to make informed decisions as to their views on issues related to the conflict. Ariza agreed, saying, “I’m more informed, so when I hear people talk about it, I know the two sides of the coin.”

 

Several participants have gone on to be successful pro-Israel advocates. Hillel Neuer, who heads UN Watch in Geneva, is an alumnus. The program’s remarkable success has pushed it to think bigger. “We’re being imitated now,” Krantz said with satisfaction. “People want to do something similar in Toronto at York University and in Winnipeg at the University of Manitoba.”

 

In the meantime, graduates of the program continue to make positive change in their communities, armed with a new determination to combat ignorance. “A lot of people are brainwashed for such a long time,” Ariza said. “They don’t really know the story…. This program exposed me to a whole new perspective.”

 

(Please Note: Professor Krantz obtained his Ph.D. from Cornell University and did his post-graduate work at Yeshiva University – Ed.)

 

Top of Page

 

 

THE FIRST ISRANET DAILY BRIEFING

From:  CIJR <cijr@isranet.org>

Date:    Friday, October 06, 2000  3:45 PM

Subject: ISRANET DAILY BRIEFING

 

ISRANET DAILY BRIEFING

A service of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research (CIJR)

                                                                                                                                               

ARAFAT'S WAR: by Charles Krauthammer, Published in The Washington Post, October 6, 2000    

 

Fighting has broken out in the Middle East, we read. This use of passive phrasing, almost universal in media reports on the violence in Israel, is a way of deliberately expressing agnosticism about the cause of the fighting. It is a scandal. It is akin to writing that on Sept. 1, 1939, war "broke out" on the German–Polish frontier. . . .The plain fact is that Yasser Arafat . . . has done what he has always done: resort to violence to regain the initiative and, most important, mint new underage martyrs–on world television–to regain the international sympathy he had forfeited by turning down peace at Camp David.

 

His pretext was that the Sept. 28 visit to the Temple Mount by Israel's leader of the opposition so offended Islam that the faithful erupted in violence. The audacity of this claim is astonishing. Yes, the Temple Mount is the third-holiest place in Islam. But it happens to be the single most holy place for Jews. . . .

 

The Palestinians are less frustrated than emboldened. . . . Emboldened by an American administration so craven that it refuses to condemn Arafat for cynically starting this war.  . . . It is not spontaneous. And it is not without direction. Arafat knows what he wants, and he is prepared to sacrifice as many of his own people as it takes to get it. Preferably on television.

 

Top of Page

 

 

Visit CIJR’s Bi-Weekly Webzine: Israzine.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing is available by e-mail.
Please urge colleagues, friends, and family to visit our website for more information on our ISRANET series.
To join our distribution list, or to unsubscribe, visit us at http://www.isranet.org/.

The ISRANET Daily Briefing is a service of CIJR. We hope that you find it useful and that you will support it and our pro-Israel educational work by forwarding a minimum $90.00 tax-deductible contribution [please send a cheque or VISA/MasterCard information to CIJR (see cover page for address)]. All donations include a membership-subscription to our respected quarterly ISRAFAX print magazine, which will be mailed to your home.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing attempts to convey a wide variety of opinions on Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world for its readers’ educational and research purposes. Reprinted articles and documents express the opinions of their authors, and do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research.

 

 

Ber Lazarus, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish ResearchL'institut Canadien de recherches sur le Judaïsme, www.isranet.org

Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284 ; ber@isranet.org

CIJR – 25 YEARS FIGHTING FOR THE JEWISH PEOPLE & COMBATING ANTISEMITISM ON CAMPUS

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Ber Lazarus, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 – Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284; E-mail:  ber@isranet.org

 

 

 Download a pdf version of today's Daily Briefing.

 

Contents:

 

CIJR: A Quarter-Century Of Israel Advocacy:  Frederick Krantz, CIJR, June 17, 2013 —What would become CIJR began in my basement twenty-five years ago, with a hardy pro-Israel band responding to the media’s first-intifada (1987-88) anti-Israel tilt towards the Palestinians.

 

CIJR At Twenty-Five Years Young!: Baruch Cohen, CIJR, June 17, 2013 — Across this quarter-century, CIJR’s unfailing work has steadily been directed at the well-being of our community, of Israel, and of the Jewish People.

From Our Readers — It is time that I finally write to you all and congratulate you over and over again on the publications of the CIJR Isranet Briefing. Several times a week, I am immediately drawn to read every editorial, story and current even news item packed into this report. I am always moved beyond belief, to anger, to shame, and to disgrace with regard to the world we are living in.

 

 

CIJR: A QUARTER-CENTURY OF ISRAEL ADVOCACY

Frederick Krantz, June 17, 2013

 

What would become CIJR began in my basement twenty-five years ago, with a hardy pro-Israel band responding to the media’s first-intifada (1987-88) anti-Israel tilt towards the Palestinians. The organized Jewish community, seemingly paralyzed, was largely silent, and we filled the breach, rallying the community and beginning what would become, today, 25 years later, an internationally-recognized, independent and pro-Israel academic think tank. And Menachem Begin z”l was the first member of our International Board.

 

The Canadian Institute for Jewish Research has put Montreal, and, indeed, Canada (with our new Toronto Chapter) on the Israel-advocacy map. It has done so through intelligent, informed, and sustained defence of Israel, the Jewish people, and—importantly—of students, on- and off their embattled campuses.

 

Initially an informal group, five or six people, CIJR—after it found that no organized group would provide it with an office and access to a secretary, let alone basic funding—incorporated (aided by now-Sen. Yoine Goldstein) as a non-profit educational endowment. We never looked back. And while finding funding has been difficult and time-consuming, over time the lack of organized-community support helped ensure CIJR’s success by reinforcing its independence, the necessary precondition of its international credibility.

 

Hence we are proud that CIJR is, in the direct sense, a true “community” entity, sustained neither by direct Israeli nor ongoing organizational support, but by the individual tax-deductible contributions of amcha, of the individual Jewish men and women who, together, constitute the community.

 

On this 25th Anniversary, I would like to remember, and thank, some key people who supported us initially, and continue to do so now. Some are departed: Clara Balinsky z”l, the great Montreal activist and Hadassah leader urged us to create an ongoing National Board; Richard z”l and Hilda Golick z”l, key early supporters, and Eddie Winant z”l, who always remembered that the Institute idea emerged from discussions across 1987-88 in the Golick kitchen, at which he was present.

 

We could not have achieved our current status without the unfailing contributions and support of the key, respected pro- Israel speakers and writers who make our publications and conferences, and work with students, possible. This includes Irwin Cotler, and our long-time Council members include, from Canada, the U.S., Europe and Israel, Professors Julien Bauer, Brian Smith, David Ben-Soussan, David Pariser, Ira Robinson (our current Associate Director), Hal Waller, Daniel Pipes (Philadelphia), Sally Zerker (Toronto), Gerald Steinberg and Mordechai Nisan (Jerusalem), R. Abraham Cooper (Los Angeles), and Isi Leibler (Jerusalem).

 

Ongoing and unfailing sources of National Board support include: our first and second Chairmen, Charles (Chuck) Lazarus and Irwin Beutel; outstanding veteran members like Thomas Hecht, Joyce and Meyer Deitcher, Evelyn Schachter, Louise Roskies Goldberg, Gustava Weiner, Ariela Cotler, Lionel Goldman, Dr. Hy Goldman, Ted Quint, Mannie Dalfen, Kurt Rothschild, Lillian and Bryant Shiller, Nathan Yacowar, and Rabbis Lionel Moses and Ronnie Cahana, and Naomi Frankenberg (Vancouver); generous donors like Evelyn and Rafi Schachter, Jack, Maureen, and Frieda Dym, Tom and Riva Hecht, Irwin Beutel, Herb and Carole Feifer, our Anniversary Honorees Aaron and Deborah Remer, Sam and Brenda Gewurz, Gail Asper and the Asper Foundation (Winnipeg); David Sherman, and Gerald Schwartz and Heather Reisman (Toronto), Robert Greenberg (Ottawa), and Sabina Citron (Jerusalem).

 

And CIJR’s success is inconceivable without the unfailing support of our remarkable Research Chairman, Baruch Cohen, resident CIJR tzaddik and member of the original 1987-8 chevra. Through his writings in CIJR’s publications, and key work in making the Romanian Holocaust known, Baruch—soon to turn 94! – has become a well-known name in Jewish communities the world over.

 

(Other wonderful volunteers include Nathan Yacowar, Esther Noodelman, and Esther Luftglass.)

 

CIJR was also committed, from the beginning, to supporting the pro-Israel work of students, on- and off-campus. This has been repaid many-fold through wonderful young people who, seized by the great miracle of the rebirth of the Jewish People on its own Land, came to make activism part of their academic and community life.

 

A case in point is our 25th Anniversary Keynote Speaker, Hillel Neuer: my student at Liberal Arts College, Concordia U., an Israel Intern and editor of the students’ Dateline: Middle East Journal at CIJR, and Irwin Cotler’s student at McGill law school. Hillel is today the world-renowned Director of the UN Watch organization in Geneva.

 

Among the many, many students who have worked at CIJR or taken our famous Student Israel-Advocacy Program (SIAP) are, inter alia, Guy Mizrachi, Karen Lazar, Elliot Kramer, Zev Gewurz, Jackie Douek, Howard Liebman, Shira Alon, Josh Peters, Alan Herman, Oscar Moore, Randy and Marian Pinsky, Merav Fima, Amariyah and Yoninah Orenstein, Josh Paiken, David Smajovits, and Charles Bybelezer.

 

Indeed, there is a real sense in which CIJR’s most important product has been precisely these young people, some of whom are not Jewish, who found the Institute an intellectually and morally nourishing place, and democratic Israel a worthy focus of their ongoing support. 3

 

Also deserving of mention are some of the newer members of our Academic Council—Prof. Csaba Nicolenyi, Barbara Kay and Machla Abramovitz (Montreal), Asaf Romirowsky (Philadelphia), Aurel Braun and Clifford Orwin (Toronto), Manfred Gerstenfeld and Amb. Alan Baker (Toronto); of our Board—Howard Bokser, Peter Margo, Esther Luftglass, Steve Bramson, Nathan Elberg, David Smajovits, and Rabbi Asher Jacobson; as well as our talented Publications Chair, Ber Lazarus, courageous Executive Assistant, Yvonne Margo, and our Toronto Chapter leaders, Prof. Sally Zerker and David Freeman

 

In closing, I would like to recognize and thank – in addition to Baruch and Sonia Cohen – three other indispensable people. One is my wife, Lenore Hammel Krantz, who has gallantly supported me over the years in what she came to term my “second, non-paying full-time job”; a second is our superb, unfailingly creative, exact, and utterly reliable desktop-publisher and aesthetic advisor of over 20 years, France Normandeau. The third person is our new, National Board Chairman, my friend, colleague, and comrade-in-arms, the unique and indomitable Jack Kincler, whose superb work is already helping make possible CIJR’s next twenty-five years.

 

It has been my privilege, and duty, and joy, to work—supported by all these wonderful people—for the well-being of Israel and the Jewish People. Am Yisrael chai! The Jewish People, and CIJR, live!

 

Prof. Frederick Krantz (Director, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research,

Editor, Daily Isranet Briefing & ISRAFAX Magazine)

 

 

CIJR AT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS YOUNG!
A SILVER ANNIVERSARY OF GREAT ACCOMPLISHMENT

Baruch Cohen, June 17, 2013

 

Israel today is a vibrant, strong democracy, an astonishing oasis of human endeavour in every field. A remarkable body of writing, informed by Jewish values, chronicles our nation’s millennial religious and civilizational achievement. The Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, CIJR, is a brilliant part of this record of achievement, a shining link in the long chain of Jewish history.

 

At twenty-five, the Institute is celebrating a Jubilee of unsurpassed pro-Israel creativity, expressed in its internationally respected publications, unique work with students, on and off campus, and rich Montreal and Toronto community-oriented seminars, colloquia, and conferences.

 

Across this quarter-century, CIJR’s unfailing work has steadily been directed at the well-being of our community, of Israel, and of the Jewish People. At twenty-five, all of us are proud to have been part of an unbroken record, despite sometimes difficult circumstances, of great accomplishment for am yisrael, the Jewish State and the Jewish People and our students. I am today, at ninety-three, proud of completing twenty-five years of unbroken, day-by-day service at CIJR, at the side of a unique man who is my friend, my colleague, and my teacher, a strong guide to Jewish thought and a tribune dedicated to the Jewish People. For this privilege I thank all our wonderful staff and supporters, and above all, I thank Fred Krantz, founder and Director of the Canadian Institute forJewish Research.

Baruch Cohen is CIJR Research Chairman

 

Top of Page

 

 

FROM OUR READERS

 

From: Hannah Brown
Sent: March 30, 2013 10:29 PM
To: cijr@isranet.org
Subject: Re: CAMPUS PROPAGANDA CAMPAIGNS OF LIES AND BLOOD LIBELS AGAINST ISRAEL/JEWS CONTINUE—HERE A BATTLE LOST, THERE A BATTLE WON

I wish that the Jewish studies departments in all universities would put up posters that say…If you truly support BDS, do not use many wonderful electronic and medical products from Israel or designed in Israel…let's see how that reality check would work with the anti-Israel crowd.  I don't think they are aware of Israel's contributions to them…it's time to give them a chance to put their money where their mouths are…or is it not put their money(that is on Israeli inventions etc. where their mouths are).  Let's see if they canspeak out of both sides of their mouths…
Hannah Brown


 

From: Chalom Schirman
Sent: April 8, 2013 8:34 PM
To: fred krantz
Subject: RE: TWENTY PHOTOS THAT CHANGE THE HOLOCAUST NARRATIVE
]
KOL HAKAVOD for distributing this doc, CIJR!!

Chalom Schirman, Director – International Executive Education (IEDP)
School of Economics & Management, Tongji University, Shanghai, China


From: Media Action Shirley Anne Haber
Sent: April 8, 2013 11:39 PM
To: 'Media Action Shirley Anne'
Subject: Today on the 70th Anniversary of the WARSAW GHETTO UPRISING we can look back and see the courage…

Friends,

Today being Holocaust Remembrance Day, it is fitting to read the stories below about the Warsaw Ghetto uprising to better understand what happened 70 years ago, the courage, bravery and sacrifice in the face of the most evil plans to mass murder the Jewish people – we must remember. Our thanks to Dr. Krantz for his efforts to educate below.

Shirley Anne Haber


From: Maureen Frumkin
Sent: April 12, 2013
To: cijr@isranet.org
Subject: Re: Isranet Daily Briefing: ANNE FRANK MUST NOT WEEP: POSITIVE JEWISH DEMOGRAPHICS, ZIONIST SELF-DETERMINATION, OFFSET REVIVED ANTISEMITISM

Good afternoon,
I hope this email finds everyone well.
It is time that I finally write to you all and congratulate you over and over again on the publications of the CIJR Isranet Briefing. Several times a week, I am immediately drawn to read every editorial, story and current even news item packed into this report. I am always moved beyond belief, to anger, to shame, and to disgrace with regard to the world we are living in.
Thank you for the exceptional, insightful and vivid work from those around the world who are the strong advocates and supporters of peace, democracy and freedom on earth.
As always, Jack and I support your endeavours to educate one and all.
Bravo!
Best wishes from us,
Maureen Frumkin Dym


From: George Goldsteen
Sent: April 13, 2013 6:13 AM
To: cijr@isranet.org
Subject: Re: Isranet Daily Briefing: ANNE FRANK MUST NOT WEEP: POSITIVE JEWISH DEMOGRAPHICS, ZIONIST SELF-DETERMINATION, OFFSET REVIVED ANTISEMITISM

Dear Professor Krantz,

 

I am responding to the article “Anne Frank must be weeping”.

 

I lost about 100 relatives in the Shoah, including my father, uncle, aunt and grandmother. I di not become aware of why they were killed until I was about 14 years old, in 1954. It was a few years later that Dutch TV began to broadcast a  long running series of documentaries about what happened in the Netherlands during the Second World War.

 

I believed then that antisemitism was dead and buried. However, in the late 1970’s or early 1980’s I saw the first sign of a renewed antisemitism on public display followed by one or two more. It was at that time I decided we should leave the Netherlands, because apparently antisemitism had never died. It was just politically incorrect to publicly spout one’s antisemitism.

 

I learned about 7 years ago, during a 3-months stay with my daughter and her family in Holland, why there was so much anti-Israel (read anti-Jewish) rhetoric in the Media and the street. After the oil-boycott of 1974 the Arab countries (who controlled OPEC) told the European countries that there would never be another oil-boycott provided these countries would stop supporting Israel and do not stop Muslims from settling in their countries.

 

Well, these countries certainly kept their end of this “bargain”. There are now millions of Muslims in Europe and the support for Israel indeed started to drop over the years. Given that the Netherlands were always friendly to Jews for centuries and thousands risked their lives to hide Jews during the Shoah, it is inconceivable it would become so anti-Israel, but it has.

 

So although I welcome and support all efforts to educate young people, the real culprits that enabled these youngsters ( and far more adults !) to acquire such feelings are the Media and governments. These two should be pursued. Their fear is of course the threat of another boycott; however there never was a boycott in 1974. The Arabs still sold oil, but the papers showed it was not shipped to Europe but elsewhere and once at sea the destinations of these tankers were changed to Rotterdam and other European ports. The Arabs just asked that this not be made public, so the people would continue to think there was a boycott. In the Netherlands no one was allowed to drive their car on Sundays. If there had been a complete boycott, then after a few months the stored supply of oil would have been exhausted, and not driving on Sunday would not have helped one bit.

 

It is the steady stream of anti-Israel articles in newspapers and newscasts on TV and radio as well as announcements by Government figures that has turned the Dutch population against Israel and then against Jews as well. So these two culprits should be targeted and the thoughts and feelings of people over time will be modified once again. I am sure you are aware of Honest Reporting, which does an excellent job of tackling the Media with good results, although unfortunately they can only deal with English-language Media.

 

The fact that the Mayor of Arnhem has said Jews  should go into hiding is nothing new. A number of local authorities in Antwerp, Sweden and Germany have told their local Jews not to dress Jewishly or speak Hebrew in the streets because they cannot protect them. Since theywould need protection primarily from Muslims, I can only conclude these authorities are afraid to be accused of racism if they start acting against these Muslims (in other words, PC gone meshuggene). 

 

Remember the Somali woman Hirsi Ali…who came to the Netherlands as a refugee, went to University and joined the Liberal Party (a centre-right party, not to be confused with the US Liberals). She had to live in her home while under 24/7 guard to protect her, after Mr. van Gogh (with whom she made a film condemning Islam for the way it views and treats women) was knifed to death by a local Muslim. In the end she was forced to leave her home, because the neighbours started to complain about the police presence. She was offered a position with a US think-tank, and so she left the country, where she was once touted as a future political leader.

 

I am afraid that if Anne Frank were alive today she would scrap her famous line, about her still believing in the good of all people, from her diary.

 

Kind Regards from Down Under,

 

Gershon Goldsteen

Launceston, Tasmania

Australia


 

From: Georgette Bensimon
Sent: April 17, 2013 9:18 PM
To: cijr@isranet.org
Subject: RE: Isranet Daily Briefing: WEDNESDAY’S “NEWS IN REVIEW” ROUND-UP

 

Hello, 
I just wanted to say that I really appreciate this way of conveying information. It is short and concise and the message is clear. Thank you for this initiative.
 
Georgette Bensimon


From: Wilf Mandel
Sent: June 11, 2013 9:45 PM
To: cijr@isranet.org
Subject: RE: JORDAN-SYRIA TENSION — ASSAD’S ADVANCE THREATENS AMMAN’S STABILITY: ISRAEL, WATCHFUL, WAITS

In regard to the article about Abdullah being anti-Israel, all you need do is read his book, in which he rewrites history, claiming that the Jews in 1948 had a massive military advantage over the invading Arab armies. He also rewrites the 1967 War, eliminating Israel's offer not to attack if Jordan stayed out of the conflict (the answer was Jordanian shelling of Israel's West Jerusalem).

He, like many rulers in the Middle East is a pragmatist, going with the flow, remembering the original Abdullah's fate and that of Sadat. He is also aware of the huge Palestinian (as opposed to Hashemite) proportion of the population, and how Arafat, in 1970, came close to deposing his father.

Wilf Mandel


 

Top of Page

 

Ber Lazarus, Publications Editor, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research/L'institut Canadien de recherches sur le Judaïsme,   www.isranet.org Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284

Top of Page

 

A Tattered History Of Genocide: George Jonas, National Post, June 12, 2013—Rummaging is a function of age. Introspective retirees spend more time in their attics than in any other room of the house. Even those who never retire and remain engaged, start looking into their old trunks with increasing frequency as time goes by.

 

If You Must Listen to Wagner, Do it in Private: Barbara Kay, National Post, May 22, 2013

Today, May 22, is the 200th birthday of famed composer Richard Wagner — so his native Germany is awash in concerts, lectures and recordings to celebrate the Jubiläumsjahr (Jubilee Year). But predictably, the additional attention has stirred up an intensified version of the never-stale debate over Wagner’s authentic legacy: aesthetic prince to be honoured, or moral leper to be shunned?

 

Jewish Firsts: Terry Glavin, National Post, June 3, 2013—Long before anyone ever spoke the word “multiculturalism,” there was a German choir, some Scotsmen and Frenchmen in costume, a “girl rabbi” named Ray and a heart stoppingly gorgeous neo-Romanesque synagogue that arose as if by magic from a boggy patch of ground near the edge of a salt marsh.

 

When the Arab Jews Fled: Lucette Lagnado, Wall Street Journal , October 12, 2012—Before the establishment of Israel in 1948, an estimated 850,000 Jews lived in the Arab world. In countries across the Middle East, there were flourishing Jewish communities with their own synagogues, schools and communal institutions. Life changed dramatically by 1948 as Arab governments declared war on the newly created Jewish state—and on the Jews within their own borders.

 

Top of Page

 

 

Visit CIJR’s Bi-Weekly Webzine: Israzine.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing is available by e-mail.
Please urge colleagues, friends, and family to visit our website for more information on our ISRANET series.
To join our distribution list, or to unsubscribe, visit us at http://www.isranet.org/.

The ISRANET Daily Briefing is a service of CIJR. We hope that you find it useful and that you will support it and our pro-Israel educational work by forwarding a minimum $90.00 tax-deductible contribution [please send a cheque or VISA/MasterCard information to CIJR (see cover page for address)]. All donations include a membership-subscription to our respected quarterly ISRAFAX print magazine, which will be mailed to your home.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing attempts to convey a wide variety of opinions on Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world for its readers’ educational and research purposes. Reprinted articles and documents express the opinions of their authors, and do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research.

 

 

Ber Lazarus, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish ResearchL'institut Canadien de recherches sur le Judaïsme, www.isranet.org

Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284 ; ber@isranet.org

CÉLÉBRONS LE 25e ANNIVERSAIRE DE L’ICRJ !

 

 

 

 

 

L’Institut canadien de recherche sur le judaïsme a 25 ans

Julien Bauer

ICRJ, 3 juin 2013

 

Hiver 1988. Nous sommes invités, ma femme et moi, au domicile de Fred Krantz pour une rencontre informelle sur ce qui pourrait être entrepris pour présenter une interprétation intellectuelle honnête d’Israël et du peuple juif face à un déferlement d’attaques malhonnêtes, pseudo-intellectuelles contre quoi que ce soit de juif et, en particulier, Israël. Sans le savoir, nous commencions l’aventure de l’Institut canadien de recherche sur le judaïsme.

 

Trois points sont à noter.

 

Le premier, hélas, est que le problème qui se manifestait il y a vingt-cinq ans, le délire anti-israélien sur les campus, n’a pas disparu et que l’ICRJ continue à jouer un rôle indispensable.

 

Le second point est qu’être associé à l’Institut semble être une cure de jouvence. Nous sommes plusieurs à avoir participé à la vie de l’Institut depuis vingt-cinq ans et nous sommes toujours présents. Le meilleur exemple est, sans aucun doute, Baruch Cohen, notre sage en résidence.

 

Le troisième point est le fait que le refus, persistant, des institutions officielles juives, de supporter l’ICRJ a constitué, sans que ce soit l’objectif poursuivi, une bénédiction. En effet, ne devant rien à personne, sinon des remerciements à nos contributeurs directs, nous pouvons travailler dans une atmosphère de totale liberté. L’Institut n’est pas le porte-parole d’une ligne politique mais présente une analyse, au mieux de nos capacités, de ce qui nous paraît à la fois scientifiquement exact et moralement juste.

 

Faire partie pendant un quart de siècle d’une telle équipe est  et continuera à être une source de joie pour ma famille.

 

Le mirage du modèle turc

David Bensoussan

Le Devoir, 4 juin 2013

 

Alors qu’il était en prison, l’actuel premier ministre turc, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, écrivait : « Les minarets seront nos baïonnettes, les coupoles nos casques, les mosquées seront nos casernes et les croyants nos soldats. » Durant sa campagne à la mairie d’Istanbul en 1994, Erdogan s’est déclaré être un « serviteur de la charia ». Bien des observateurs préférèrent ne pas tenir compte de ces propos, préférant vanter l’islamisme modéré exemplaire de la Turquie. Peu d’entre eux estimaient alors voir la Turquie sombrer dans une dictature idéologique, convaincus qu’ils étaient de ce qu’Erdogan devait « obligatoirement » diluer ses convictions profondes en raison du réalisme qui devrait « normalement » accompagner l’accession au pouvoir de son parti, l’AKP.

 

L’Europe louangea la mouvance démocratique de la Turquie, considérant que la toute-puissance des généraux constituait un frein à l’éventuelle adhésion de ce pays à l’Union européenne. Or l’Europe se prononça assez brutalement contre l’adhésion de la Turquie, à commencer par le président français Sarkozy, qui déclara que ce pays n’avait pas sa place dans l’Union européenne. La Turquie se concentra alors sur le développement de relations privilégiées avec le Proche-Orient et l’Asie. Erdogan salua le Printemps arabe et admonesta les dirigeants en place, les incitant à « écouter leur peuple ». La Turquie participa à l’intervention armée en Libye, proposa des accords bilatéraux importants à l’Égypte, appuya le Hamas à Gaza et les rebelles de Syrie. Or le pouvoir syrien se montra plus coriace que prévu et les retombées économiques espérées avec les pays arabes déstabilisés ne se concrétisèrent pas.

 

Au fil des ans, le « modèle turc » devint de moins en moins attrayant. Après les généraux, ce fut au tour des journalistes libéraux d’être emprisonnés. Sur le plan de la liberté de presse, la Turquie est aujourd’hui classée au 154e rang (sur 179 pays) par Reporters sans frontières. À titre d’exemple, alors que CNN montrait des dizaines de milliers de manifestants sur la place Taksim, la version turque de CNN faisait passer un documentaire sur les manchots de l’Antarctique ! Des mesures d’islamisation rampantes furent prises : relaxation des lois sur le port du voile islamique ; tentative de loi visant à criminaliser l’adultère ; condamnation à 13 mois de prison d’un intellectuel ayant critiqué le prophète Mahomet ; arrêt de vente de boissons alcoolisées la nuit. La revalorisation de la gloire passée de l’Empire ottoman alla jusqu’à exalter devant des audiences de jeunes turcs l’illustre bataille de Manzikert au cours de laquelle les Turcs seljuks défirent les chrétiens byzantins en 1071.

 

Pourtant, le parti d’Erdogan fut réélu avec une majorité de 50 % aux élections législatives en 2011, ce qui le dispensa de tout accommodement avec des partis d’opposition. Durant la campagne électorale, Erdogan vanta la performance économique de la Turquie, 17e puissance économique du monde. Peu de personnes prêtèrent alors attention aux dessous de ce succès économique dû en partie à l’infusion de prêts à court terme consentis essentiellement par les émirats du Golfe en 2009 et qui atteignirent 115 milliards en 2012. Or, la dette extérieure à court terme augmente de 30 % par an. La dette publique est de l’ordre de 80 % du PIB. La dette des consommateurs turcs augmente annuellement de 40 %, et l’inflation gravite autour de 7 %. Le taux de croissance prodigieux du PIB à partir de 2010 est maintenant revenu à un niveau inférieur à celui de 2008. Qui plus est, le ralentissement des économies d’Europe et de Russie, de même que l’instabilité qui prévaut dans bien des pays arabes, ont rétréci les marchés d’exportation turcs. Le miracle économique turc est encore en sursis.

 

Sur la scène internationale, Erdogan a tenté de s’imposer partout, avec un succès plus qu’incertain : attaques répétées et démesurées contre Israël qui lui valurent des réserves sérieuses de la part des leaders européens ; tentative – avortée – de servir d’intermédiaire pour résoudre le problème de la prolifération de la technologie nucléaire iranienne ; soutien systématique du Printemps arabe et, pour ce qui est de la crise syrienne, la Turquie doit composer aujourd’hui avec l’afflux des réfugiés syriens, lequel mécontente grandement les populations frontalières. Elle doit aussi trouver sa place entre l’Arabie saoudite qui soutient les salafistes ; le Qatar qui finance les Frères musulmans ; l’Iran qui appuie le Hezbollah libanais et le régime syrien ; la Russie et la Chine qui soutiennent le pouvoir syrien et l’Occident qui ne finit pas d’hésiter d’appuyer des rebelles syriens de peur que ces derniers ne finissent par être dominés par des extrémistes musulmans, ce qui pourrait engendrer ultérieurement un problème majeur. L’incertitude qui prime à l’heure actuelle n’augure rien de bon pour l’économie turque dont la performance fut l’atout majeur du succès électoral de l’AKP en 2011.

 

On pourra noter que le conflit syrien débuta avec une simple manifestation d’adolescents et une répression démesurée. Au parc Gezi d’Istanbul, la répression policière devant la revendication écologique fut également démesurée, ce qui déclencha l’expression ouverte de la frustration des mécontents turcs, dont les libéraux. Défiant, Erdogan a affirmé pouvoir réunir un million de manifestants ce qui, selon lui, naniserait la contestation en cours. Actuellement, Erdogan se donne le crédit d’une paix (prématurée ?) avec la rébellion kurde et cherche à établir un changement constitutionnel pour établir un régime présidentiel en Turquie, lequel prendrait effet lorsqu’il aura achevé son second mandat de premier ministre en 2015.

 

Après une longue période de silence, la contestation politique devant la dégradation des libertés s’est enfin déclenchée.

 

 

La marche turque vers l’inconnu

Freddy Eytan

Le CAPE de Jérusalem, 6 juin 2013

 

Jusqu’à ce jour, tous les observateurs s’accordaient pour dire que l’islamisme en Turquie était éclairé et responsable, contrairement à l’obscurantisme de certains pays arabes et de l’Iran. Tous étaient d’avis que le Premier ministre Recep Tayyip Erdogan menait son grand pays vers un modernisme occidental exemplaire et personne ne se doutait que la grogne latente jaillirait si tôt dans les rues d’Istanbul, d’Izmir ou d’Ankara. 

 

Les violentes manifestations qui déferlent ces jours-ci dans les grandes villes turques changent complètement la donne et inquiètent profondément les Occidentaux et les Israéliens. Quo Vadis la Turquie ? Subira-t-elle les retombées des révoltes arabes ? La montée en puissance des extrémistes islamistes et des terroristes chiites et sunnites ? Marchera-t-elle vers le chaos, vers l’inconnu politique qui déstabilisera tout le Moyen-Orient et plongera-t-elle dans des turbulences dévastatrices islamiques ? Comment devrait réagir l’Etat juif ? Ce sont de graves questions auxquelles nous n’avons pas de réponses précises et sur lesquelles nous réfléchissons sérieusement alors que l’Occident reste indifférent, notamment une administration américaine nonchalante et impuissante à régler les crises locales et régionales. 

 

Certes, la Turquie n’est pas l’Egypte, ni la Syrie ou la Libye ; ce grand pays charnière entre l’Europe et l’Asie est riche et prospère, et son tourisme est florissant. La majorité écrasante de la population est chaleureuse, ouverte au dialogue, et souhaite ardemment entretenir de bonnes relations commerciales avec l’extérieur, notamment avec Israël. Elle ne peut tolérer la mise en quarantaine économique, les sanctions et l’isolement politique. Membre actif de l’OTAN, la Turquie dépend des Américains mais souhaite vivement s’intégrer à l’Europe. Les dernières manifestations violentes ont sans doute estompé cet espoir pour longtemps encore. La Turquie a brutalement changé de visage !

 

Recep Tayyip Erdogan a été élu démocratiquement pour la troisième fois et demeure populaire mais il n’a pas réussi à faire coexister religion, politique et démocratie occidentale dans une parfaite harmonie. Devant ce cuisant échec et suite aux répliques du « Printemps arabe », nous constatons que les islamistes totalitaires d’aujourd’hui ne peuvent diriger leur pays avec des valeurs démocratiques et universelles. Le cas de l’Egypte est éloquent et celui de l’Iran, criant. Les deux doctrines sont incompatibles et inconciliables, la démocratie n’étant pas seulement affaire d’élections, c’est un état d’esprit. Seul le divorce, la séparation totale de la religion islamique avec l’Etat pourra permettre de gérer un pays dans la voie de toutes les libertés et du respect des droits de l’homme et de la femme. Erdogan a choisi la mauvaise voie et surtout la manière forte. Il a jeté en prison les opposants au régime, a contrôlé l’état-major de l’armée qui fut naguère le garant des laïcs et de la stabilité ; il a muselé la presse, rejette avec mépris les nouveaux réseaux sociaux dont Facebook et Twitter, et rêve toujours de devenir le nouveau leader ottoman du monde sunnite. Il s’est trompé sur toute la ligne et notamment dans sa politique anti-israélienne. A l’évidence, il a perdu la face!

 

Pour empêcher le chaos et lui éviter de subir le sort de Moubarak ou Ben Ali, Erdogan devra agir vite, avec sagesse, éviter à tout prix les affrontements avec les indignés et apaiser rapidement les esprits par des mesures démocratiques et des réformes libérales. Sinon, la population s’abandonnera à sa colère, la grogne explosera en permanence, et son régime tombera tôt ou tard. 

 

Au moment où nous tournons la page tumultueuse avec les Turcs et relançons le dialogue diplomatique et économique avec Ankara, nous suivons ces derniers événements avec vigilance et inquiétude. Devant la crise syrienne, les dernières manifestations en Iran contre le régime obscur des ayatollahs, et les risques réels d’un embrasement de toute la région, il est de notre propre intérêt de revoir s’installer en Turquie la stabilité et la prospérité, et de pouvoir entretenir avec ce grand pays de l’Islam sunnite des relations fructueuses et amicales.

CIJR In the News:

 

IN CANADA, TEACHING ZIONISM, ONE STUDENT AT A TIME
Alexandra Markus

Israel Campus Beat, February 11, 2013

 

Five years ago, Concordia University professor Frederick Krantz noticed a lack of preparedness among Jewish students when faced with the growing anti-Zionist fervor he witnessed on his campus. “Zionism was becoming a negative term and we at the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research (CIJR) wanted to do something about it,” he said, “so we started the Student Israel Advocacy Program (SIAP), a year-long seminar with college faculty for the public, to give them facts and data about Jewish and Zionist history, the Arab-Israel conflict and the rise in propaganda.”

 

Krantz, a professor of liberal arts and humanities who completed his PhD at Yeshiva University on the history of anti-Semitism, is the director of CIJR, a 25-year-old organization that is connected with the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. The SIAP is one of its many outreach projects.

 

“Frequently, Jewish students, even those who went to Jewish schools, don’t know much history of the Arab-Israeli conflict, so when they are confronted with highly propagandistic Arab students, professors and speakers, they are not prepared,” Krantz noted. SIAP aims to change that by building upon participants’ knowledge of Jewish and Middle East history, their rhetorical skills and their ability to debate and organize on campus, through seminars and workshops. The program stresses the importance of mutual support among Israel supporters.

 

“Our overarching goal is to provide students with the truth about the history of the conflict, facts that allow them to dispute the assertions which are made on campus,” Krantz said, adding, “we try to not only teach these skills, but provide participants with the psychological confidence to put them to good use.”

 

Faculty from three of Montreal’s four universities work together to lead seven workshops each year. Enrolment in the program largely consists of college and university students, but a small contingent of older participants also enrols each year. Generally, 15-20 people complete the program annually. Krantz estimated that approximately 40% of program participants are non-Jewish: “Some of these non-Jewish kids become the most sincerely committed Zionists in the groups we have educated over the years, which has been very satisfying for us,” he said.

 

Laura Ariza Pena Corea, 24, who studies public policy at Concordia University and is not Jewish, completed the program two years ago. She hails from Colombia, a predominantly Catholic country with a small Jewish population. “When I came here, I made some Jewish friends and expressed an interest in learning more about the history and culture, so I was referred to the program,” she explained.

 

Krantz emphasized that the program aims to impart facts rather than opinions, giving participants enough background and history to make informed decisions as to their views on issues related to the conflict. Ariza agreed, saying, “I’m more informed, so when I hear people talk about it, I know the two sides of the coin.”

 

Several participants have gone on to be successful pro-Israel advocates. Hillel Neuer, who heads UNWatch in Geneva, is an alumnus. The program’s remarkable success has pushed it to think bigger. “We’re being imitated now,” Krantz said with satisfaction. “People want to do something similar in Toronto at York University and in Winnipeg at the University of Manitoba.”

 

In the meantime, graduates of the program continue to make positive change in their communities, armed with a new determination to combat ignorance. “A lot of people are brainwashed for such a long time,” Ariza said. “They don’t really know the story…. This program exposed me to a whole new perspective.”

 

(Please Note: Professor Krantz obtained his Ph.D. from Cornell University and did his post-graduate work at Yeshiva University – Ed.)