Tag: Counter-Terrorism

M.E MILITARY: RUSSIA/IRAN/SYRIA & ISRAEL’S FIGHT AGAINST GLOBAL TERRORISM

The Price of Powerlessness: Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, Aug. 18, 2016— This week Russian bombers flew out of Iranian air bases to attack rebel positions in Syria. The State Department pretended not to be surprised. It should be. It should be alarmed. Iran’s intensely nationalistic revolutionary regime had never permitted foreign forces to operate from its soil. Until now.

What Outcome Do We Seek in Syria?: Shoshana Bryen, Jewish Policy Center, Aug. 22, 2016— Russian warplanes took off this week from Iran to hit targets in Syria. Russia has used Iranian bases for refueling and resupply in the past, but this is its first bombing mission from the Islamic Republic — it is also the first foreign military operation to take place from Iranian soil since the 1979 revolution. Iran’s National Security chief said Iran and Russia “enjoy strategic cooperation in the fight against terrorism in Syria, and share their facilities and capacities to this end.”

Israel’s Virtual Security Zone: Jonathan Spyer, The Jerusalem Post, Aug. 12, 2016— Cautious and prudent, Israeli policy over the last five years has largely succeeded in sealing off the Syrian civil war from Israel’s territory. This has been achieved through the careful cultivation of a working relationship with rebel militias on the other side of the Golan Heights border, along with a readiness to act on occasion decisively to neutralize emergent dangers.

Israel Values U.S. Military Aid But Does Well On Its Own Steam, Too: Moshe Arens, Haaretz, Aug. 22, 2016— A number of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s critics claim they could have obtained a better deal in the negotiations for the U.S. military aid package; it’s like in that Irving Berlin song: “Anything you can do I can do better.” There’s a lot of hype in these claims, but the subject of U.S. military aid to Israel is still worth discussing.

 

On Topic Links

 

Iranian Vessels Chases US Ship Out of International Waters [WATCH]: Abra Forman,Breaking Israel News, Aug. 25, 2016

US Moves Nuclear Weapons From Turkey to Romania: Georgi Gotev& Joel Schalit, EurActiv, Aug. 18, 2016

U.S. Concedes $400 Million Payment to Iran Was Delayed as Prisoner ‘Leverage’: David E. Sanger, New York Times, Aug. 18, 2016

Raqqa Delenda Est: Why Baghdadi’s “Caliphate” Should Be Destroyed: Col. (res.) Dr. Eran Lerman, BESA, Aug. 10, 2016

Were Obama and Hillary Founders of ISIS? You Bet: Kenneth R. Timmerman, Breitbart, Aug 12, 2016

 

 

THE PRICE OF POWERLESSNESS

Charles Krauthammer

Washington Post, Aug. 18, 2016

 

This week Russian bombers flew out of Iranian air bases to attack rebel positions in Syria. The State Department pretended not to be surprised. It should be. It should be alarmed. Iran’s intensely nationalistic revolutionary regime had never permitted foreign forces to operate from its soil. Until now.

 

The reordering of the Middle East is proceeding apace. Where for 40 years the U.S.-Egypt alliance anchored the region, a Russia-Iran condominium is now dictating events. That’s what you get after eight years of U.S. retrenchment and withdrawal. That’s what results from the nuclear deal with Iran, the evacuation of Iraq and utter U.S. immobility on Syria. Consider:

 

Iran: the nuclear deal was supposed to begin a rapprochement between Washington and Tehran. Instead, it has solidified a strategic-military alliance between Moscow and Tehran. With the lifting of sanctions and the normalizing of Iran’s international relations, Russia rushed in with major deals, including the shipment of S-300 ground-to-air missiles. Russian use of Iranian bases now marks a new level of cooperation and joint power projection.

 

Iraq: these bombing runs cross Iraqi airspace. Before President Obama’s withdrawal from Iraq, that could not have happened. The resulting vacuum has not only created a corridor for Russian bombing, it has gradually allowed a hard-won post-Saddam Iraq to slip into Iran’s orbit. According to a Baghdad-based U.S. military spokesman, there are 100,000 Shiite militia fighters operating inside Iraq, 80 percent of them Iranian-backed.

 

Syria: when Russia dramatically intervened last year, establishing air bases and launching a savage bombing campaign, Obama did nothing. Indeed, he smugly predicted that Vladimir Putin had entered a quagmire. Some quagmire. Bashar al-Assad’s regime is not only saved. It encircled Aleppo and has seized the upper hand in the civil war. Meanwhile, our hapless secretary of state is running around trying to sue for peace, offering to share intelligence and legitimize Russian intervention if only Putin will promise to conquer gently.

 

Consider what Putin has achieved. Dealt a very weak hand — a rump Russian state, shorn of empire and saddled with a backward economy and a rusting military — he has restored Russia to great-power status. Reduced to irrelevance in the 1990s, it is now a force to be reckoned with. In Europe, Putin has unilaterally redrawn the map. His annexation of Crimea will not be reversed. The Europeans are eager to throw off the few sanctions they grudgingly imposed on Russia. And the rape of eastern Ukraine continues.

 

Ten thousand have already died and now Putin is threatening even more open warfare. Under the absurd pretext of Ukrainian terrorism in Crimea (reminiscent of Hitler’s claim that he invaded Poland in response to a Polish border incursion), Putin has threatened retaliation, massed troops in eight locations on the Ukrainian border, ordered Black Sea naval exercises and moved advanced anti-aircraft batteries into Crimea, giving Moscow control over much of Ukrainian airspace.

 

State Department spokesman John Kirby told reporters on Aug. 18 that negotiators had “deliberately leveraged” Iran’s desire to get a $400 million payment from a decades-old arms deal to ensure authorities would not renege on freeing three Americans in January. (U.S. Department of State) And why shouldn’t he? He’s pushing on an open door. Obama still refuses to send Ukraine even defensive weapons. The administration’s response to these provocations? Urging “both sides” to exercise restraint. Both sides, mind you. And in a gratuitous flaunting of its newly expanded reach, Russia will be conducting joint naval exercises with China in the South China Sea, in obvious support of Beijing’s territorial claims and illegal military bases.

 

Yet the president shows little concern. He is too smart not to understand geopolitics; he simply doesn’t care. In part because his priorities are domestic. In part because he thinks we lack clean hands and thus the moral standing to continue to play international arbiter. And in part because he’s convinced that in the long run it doesn’t matter …

[To Read the Full Article Click the Following Link—Ed.]

 

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WHAT OUTCOME DO WE SEEK IN SYRIA?

Shoshana Bryen

Jewish Policy Center, Aug. 22, 2016

 

Russian warplanes took off this week from Iran to hit targets in Syria. Russia has used Iranian bases for refueling and resupply in the past, but this is its first bombing mission from the Islamic Republic — it is also the first foreign military operation to take place from Iranian soil since the 1979 revolution. Iran’s National Security chief said Iran and Russia “enjoy strategic cooperation in the fight against terrorism in Syria, and share their facilities and capacities to this end.”

 

Whether temporary or serving longer term Russian interests, the increasing breadth and capability of the Russian military in the region — allied with the State Department’s number one designated state sponsor of terror — presents problems for the United States. The Obama administration, however, appears oddly unconcerned.

 

A State Department spokesperson said, “We have nothing to announce at this time. We speak regularly with Russian officials about ways to strengthen the Cessation of Hostilities, improve humanitarian access and bring about the conditions necessary to find a political solution to this conflict.” Another spokesperson called it, “unfortunate, but not surprising or unexpected.” From the Pentagon, “As we understand it, they hit three areas in Syria. One area had ISIS fighters in it, and we have hit there ourselves before. The other two areas do not have ISIS concentrations.”

 

The area that did not have ISIS fighters had anti-Assad rebels. Does the State Department think Russian bombing will help “find a political solution to the conflict”? What does the U.S. think a “political solution” should look like?

 

There is no easy side for America to take — if we take any. On one side is a war criminal, whose allies are Russia, Iran, and Hizb’allah (a U.S.-designated terrorist organization). On the other is the “opposition,” a collection of fighters including Jabhat al-Nusra — until last week calling itself an arm of al Qaeda — the Free Syrian Army, ISIS-affiliated rebels, and groups with acronyms previously unknown. Some will fight ISIS. Someare ISIS. Some will fight only Assad. Just about all are Sunni Islamists supported financially by America’s erstwhile allies in the Gulf plus Turkey. Among the Kurdish groups, some are Assad’s allies; some are America’s allies. All are the enemy of Turkey, a NATO member.

 

Our allies have their own agendas, as do our adversaries.

 

The Iran-Russia axis anchors the ends of the Shiite Crescent from Iran across Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, ending in the Mediterranean. The Crescent is an Iranian goal that threatens a variety of countries on its periphery, including Israel and Turkey. Russia’s goals include 1) maintaining a friendly government in Damascus that will permit Russian bases at Tartus and Latakia, 2) broader military access to the region, and 3) status as “go to” power as the United States withdraws its influence. Partnership in the Shiite Crescent ensures all three.

 

Washington has been trying to find a way to cooperate with Russia in Syria without acknowledging that Russia’s goals, and Iran’s, are inimical to the president’s insistence that Assad has to go. The Washington Post reminded its readers this week of Mr. Obama’s words in 2012. “With allies and partners, we will keep increasing the pressure, with a diplomatic effort to further isolate Assad and his regime …

[To Read the Full Article Click the Following Link—Ed.]

 

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ISRAEL’S VIRTUAL SECURITY ZONE

Jonathan Spyer

Jerusalem Post, Aug. 12, 2016

 

Cautious and prudent, Israeli policy over the last five years has largely succeeded in sealing off the Syrian civil war from Israel’s territory. This has been achieved through the careful cultivation of a working relationship with rebel militias on the other side of the Golan Heights border, along with a readiness to act on occasion decisively to neutralize emergent dangers.

 

The success of such a policy is by definition fragile, as is the calm it produces. A single mishap could transform the situation. In recent weeks, there has been a notable uptick in the volume of incidents on the border, though a general deterioration still seems distant.

 

Reserve soldiers serving along the borderline describe a reality in which both regime and rebels are engaged in constantly testing the alertness of Israeli forces, looking to take advantage of any momentary lapse of attention. Israel responds to all instances of fire into Israeli territory, including when these appear to be inadvertent rather than deliberate. The intention is to keep the war away from the border.

 

One of the unplanned results of this policy is the emergence of small tent emplacements close to the line of division. Refugees have made their way to the border area, assuming that the Syrian Army will tend to avoid it. July was a busy month. On July 4, the technical fence was damaged by Syrian Army fire. Israel responded by striking at two regime targets. Then on the 18th, a drone was dispatched across the border to Israel. Israeli attempts to down it were unsuccessful – Russian officials later reportedly admitted that the UAV belonged to the Russian military. A week later, Israel responded to stray Syrian mortar rounds that came across the border. An Israeli aircraft destroyed the mortar emplacement.

 

July witnessed an unexpected visit to the Quneitra area by Gen. Muhammad Reza Naqdi, commander of the Basij paramilitary forces in Iran. There were also reports of Israeli bulldozers operating in the demilitarized zone east of the technical fence, in the area between Ein Zivan and Quneitra. This reporter witnessed evidence of this work, on a recent trip to the Golan.

 

The Assad regime and its allies control only a few points along the border. Most of it is held by rebel forces, described by IDF soldiers stationed at one of the border posts as a mix of Jabhat al-Nusra and other free army groups. The southern part of the border, however, is the area of greatest concern. This is held by the Khaled Ibn al-Walid Brigade, a franchise of Islamic State, formerly known as the Shuhada al-Yarmuk Brigades. The Israeli assumption is that, at a certain point, this organization will almost certainly turn its guns against Israel. In the meantime, the two sides watch each other closely.

 

The entry of rebel and civilian wounded via the border fence is a regular occurrence, as is the transfer of humanitarian aid. The UN is the body that facilitates this process. It all seems to be working smoothly. The sound of gunfire punctuates the days and the nights on the Golan. Sometimes it is the distant, ominous boom of heavy artillery, perhaps from the area south of Damascus. The Syrian capital is only 70 km. away. At other times the rattle of small arms fire can be heard. This is closer, perhaps evidence of a skirmish between the rebels and the jihadists of the Khalid Ibn al-Walid …

[To Read the Full Article Click the Following Link—Ed.]

 

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ISRAEL VALUES U.S. MILITARY AID

BUT DOES WELL ON ITS OWN STEAM, TOO

Moshe Arens

Haaretz, Aug. 22, 2016

 

A number of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s critics claim they could have obtained a better deal in the negotiations for the U.S. military aid package; it’s like in that Irving Berlin song: “Anything you can do I can do better.” There’s a lot of hype in these claims, but the subject of U.S. military aid to Israel is still worth discussing.

 

After the Yom Kippur War, when the Israel Defense Forces had to be rebuilt and rearmed, U.S. military aid to Israel equaled 20 percent of Israel’s gross domestic product and covered about half the Israeli defense budget. Most of the equipment the IDF acquired came from the United States.

 

The quality edge, so essential to Israel, was provided by American arms that were superior to the Soviet arms in the hands of Israel’s enemies. This was assistance that Israel needed for its survival, both from an economic and a military point of view.

 

Much has changed in the past 42 years. Israel has prospered, and in most areas, with the exception of fighter aircraft, the IDF’s quality edge in weaponry is the product of Israeli research and development. At the present time, Israel’s GDP is well over $300 billion, and U.S. military assistance equals about 1.5 percent of Israel’s GDP and covers a little over 20 percent of Israel’s defense budget.

 

U.S. aid is much appreciated, but at this stage it’s not essential to Israel’s survival. If an economic crisis in the United States led to a cancellation of this aid, Israel would have to, and could, survive without it. It’s economically possible to cover the entire defense budget from Israeli resources, but this of course would require cuts in the budgets of other sectors. A change in the U.S. aid package deleting the money Israel is allowed to spend in the Israeli defense industry would hurt most in the near term.

 

Actually, the major downturn in U.S.-Israeli military relations came with the cancellation of the Lavi fighter aircraft in 1987. The Lavi project reflected U.S. consent that a substantial part of U.S. military aid could be applied to procurement in Israel, rather than being restricted to procurement in the United States.

 

But conveniently forgotten by many, the Lavi was an Israeli-American project in which American aerospace companies were major participants. This was part of a breakthrough in U.S. policy that permitted American defense contractors to participate in the project and allowed free transfer of U.S. technology.

A Lavi fighter aircraft prototype. Courtesy of IAI

 

Pratt & Whitney provided an engine developed specifically for the Lavi. Grumman built the wings and tail. Lear Siegler provided the fly-by-wire computer, and Hughes Aircraft the head-up display. All were permitted to sign license agreements with Israeli companies for subsequent production in Israel. That kind of technological cooperation between Israel and the United States, which would have been a precursor to future cooperation, ended with the cancellation of the Lavi …

[To Read the Full Article Click the Following Link—Ed.]

 

Moshe Arens, Former Israeli Minister of Defense and Ambassador to the U.S, is a Member of CIJR’s International Board

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On Topic Links

 

Iranian Vessels Chases US Ship Out of International Waters [WATCH]: Abra Forman, Breaking Israel News, Aug. 25, 2016— Four Iranian warships harassed a US Navy destroyer in the Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday, speeding so close to the destroyer that the US ship had to swerve to avoid collision. The incident took place in the strait leading out of the Persian Gulf. The USS Nitze, a guided-missile destroyer, was surprised by four Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy high-speed patrol boats weaving towards it in a serpentine formation.

US Moves Nuclear Weapons From Turkey to Romania: Georgi Gotev& Joel Schalit, EurActiv, Aug. 18, 2016— EXCLUSIVE/ Two independent sources told EurActiv.com that the US has started transferring nuclear weapons stationed in Turkey to Romania, against the background of worsening relations between Washington and Ankara. According to one of the sources, the transfer has been very challenging in technical and political terms. “It’s not easy to move 20+ nukes,” said the source, on conditions of anonymity.

U.S. Concedes $400 Million Payment to Iran Was Delayed as Prisoner ‘Leverage’: David E. Sanger, New York Times, Aug. 18, 2016— The State Department conceded for the first time on Thursday that it delayed making a $400 million payment to Iran for several hours in January “to retain maximum leverage” and ensure that three American prisoners were released the same day.

Raqqa Delenda Est: Why Baghdadi’s “Caliphate” Should Be Destroyed: Col. (res.) Dr. Eran Lerman, BESA, Aug. 10, 2016— While Iran remains the greatest threat to the region, the continued existence of IS fortifies rather than enervates Iran’s quest for hegemony. The destruction of IS should be the first stage in a campaign designed ultimately to isolate and contain Iran.

Were Obama and Hillary Founders of ISIS? You Bet: Kenneth R. Timmerman, Breitbart, Aug 12, 2016— Even the left-stream media is now acknowledging that Donald Trump “has a point” when he blasts Hilary and Obama for creating ISIS. “Hillary Clinton is vulnerable. ISIS did gain strength during her time as Secretary of State,” said ABC News correspondent Martha Raddatz

MUBARAK ACQUITTED, BROAD ANTI-TERROR LAWS PLANNED: “DEEP STATE” RETURNS TO EGYPT

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Rob Coles, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 

 

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Sisi Regime Shows Confidence as ‘Deep State’ Returns to Egypt's Political Landscape: Ariel Ben Solomon, Jerusalem Post, Dec. 1, 2014— The acquittal of former president Hosni Mubarak, his sons, and other close aides demonstrates that Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has settled comfortably in power and marks the return of the deep state.

Egypt’s War on Terrorism: Neville Teller, Jerusalem Post, Nov. 6, 2014— The tentacles of Islamic State (IS), already coiled around large areas of northern Iraq and Syria, are now reaching out as far as northern Sinai. 

Egypt's War on Terrorism: World's Double Standards: Khaled Abu Toameh, Gatestone Institute, Nov. 3, 2014 — Three months after the military conformation between Hamas and Israel, the Egyptians are also waging their own war on terrorism in north Sinai.

Hunger Growls in Egypt: Daniel Pipes, Washington Times, Oct. 3, 2014— Egypt, famed for millennia as the “breadbasket of the Mediterranean,” now faces alarming food shortages. A startlingly candid report in Cairo’s Al-Ahram newspaper by Gihan Shahine, titled “Food for Stability,” makes clear the extent of the crisis.

 

On Topic Links

 

Mubarak ‘Not Guilty’ Ruling Signals the End of Egypt’s Arab Spring: Araminta Wordsworth, National Post, Dec. 1, 2014

“Terrorism” in Egypt: Elliott Abrams, Council on Foreign Relations, Dec. 1, 2014

Egypt Plans Blanket Anti-Terrorism Law Against 'Disrupting Order': Stuart Wilner, Times of Israel, Nov. 26, 2014

In Egypt, Jihadists Release Video of an October Attack: Kareem Fahim & Merna Thomas, New York Times, Nov. 15, 2014

                                                  

                   

SISI REGIME SHOWS CONFIDENCE AS ‘DEEP STATE’

RETURNS TO EGYPT'S POLITICAL LANDSCAPE                                   

Ariel Ben Solomon                                                                                                        

Jerusalem Post, Dec. 1, 2014

 

The acquittal of former president Hosni Mubarak, his sons, and other close aides demonstrates that Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has settled comfortably in power and marks the return of the deep state. The term “deep state” refers to a group of powerful nondemocratic leaders who, though they may be concealed under layers of bureaucracy, are actually in control of the country. To be sure, Sisi has smartly led the important Arab state from the depth of riots, terrorist attacks, economic crisis and outside pressures, but the style and makeup, if not the policies, of the government are reminiscent of Mubarak’s regime.

 

The fact of the matter is that the Mubarak trial was bound to be based not on a strict reading of the evidence but on the wishes of the regime in power. Muslim Brotherhood spokeswoman Wafaa Hefni admitted as much, saying that if former Islamist president Mohamed Morsi were in power, the ruling would have been different, the Daily News Egypt reported. Arab politics is a matter of winner take all, and the court verdicts can be considered as Sisi’s coattails. In March, Robert Springborg argued in an article for the BBC that the Mubarak era personalities were key to Sisi’s consolidation of power. “At present, [Sisi] he is relying on the military, other elements of the deep state and Mubarak-era technocrats to manage his campaign, thereby suggesting he hopes to rule as a sort of presidential version of King Abdullah II of Jordan or King Muhammad VI of Morocco, balancing off the various political parties and forces under him while relying on the deep state for the essence of his rule.”

 

“The Mubarak trial was a classical political trial,” Prof. Yoram Meital, chairman of the Chaim Herzog Center for Middle East Studies and Diplomacy at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, told The Jerusalem Post. “It was impossible to separate the trial and the political context in Egypt,” he said. Sisi’s regime is largely a continuation of the governing mechanism introduced by Mubarak, but following his fall, processes of dramatic political change took place, and this trial is not going to be the final word on the 2011 January Revolution, asserted Meital. Of course, the verdict is a serious blow for the supporters of the revolution, which opposed the return of an authoritarian regime, argued Meital. “The popular uprising that toppled Mubarak created a new reality in Egypt and planted a new political consciousness among many sectors, particularly the younger generation,” Meital said. “The court’s decision pours oil on the fire of this struggle,” as Egyptian society “is divided in an unprecedented way and the court’s decision regarding Mubarak intensifies the polarization and could lead to further escalation between the regime and the opposition,” Meital added.

 

Zvi Mazel, who served as Israel’s sixth ambassador to Egypt and today is a fellow at the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs and a contributor to the Post, said that it is too simple to say that Egypt has gone back to Mubarak’s regime. “Sisi is different. He wants to reform Egypt, and he is working on it,” said Mazel, adding, “Mubarak wanted only calm and stability and wasted his tenure.” By contrast, Sisi has promised to maintain basic freedoms through law as he modernizes the country. That the court was able to acquit Mubarak signals that “Egypt has reached a new phase,” Mazel said, as the revolutionary period was emotionally charged with Egyptians seeking vengeance for the failure and poverty that the former president represented. After almost four years of violence, said Mazel, Egyptians are tired after having succeeded in ousting the Muslim Brotherhood regime, preventing “a religious dictatorship.” Now, people want stability and economic development and have faith in Sisi, who is doing a great job so far, asserted Mazel.

 

Regarding the trial, Mazel said that protesters were not killed during the first days but only after the Muslim Brotherhood intervened and attacked the police and public institutions. “In 2012 the court gave a verdict under pressure of the revolution; now – according to the evidence,” said Mazel, pointing out: “Everyone knows that Mubarak was not [former Iraqi president] Saddam Hussein or [former Libyan president] Muammar Gaddafi.” It is true that his police tortured citizens and he did not tackle the social-economic problems of Egypt, but he didn’t just kill people, argued the former Israeli ambassador. Mazel predicts that the Brotherhood will use his acquittal to say that the Mubarak regime has returned. “But this is not the situation,” he said.

                                                                       

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EGYPT’S WAR ON TERRORISM                                                                  

Neville Teller                                             

Jerusalem Post, Nov. 6, 2014  

 

The tentacles of Islamic State (IS), already coiled around large areas of northern Iraq and Syria, are now reaching out as far as northern Sinai.  Egypt's most active militant group is Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis, and whether or not it is formally allied with IS and its leader, the self-styled caliph of all Muslims – contradictory reports about that have recently appeared in the press – it is certainly closely aligned to IS, whose objectives it backs, and whose methods it copies. Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis, which attempted to kill the interior minister in Cairo in 2013 in a car bomb attack, has issued videos of the beheading of captives.  It claimed responsibility for the bomb attack in Sinai in September, when at least 11 policemen were killed in a convoy travelling through village of Wefaq, near the Gaza border. 

 

Based on intercepted phone calls and text messages, Egyptian security officials recently claimed to have uncovered requests for aid from Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis to IS.  According to this intelligence, the Sinai-based terror group requested the IS senior leadership to send trained members to Sinai to help carry out terrorist attacks. On Friday, October 24, two attacks in the Sinai peninsula killed 33 Egyptian security personnel.  In the first, in the al-Kharouba area northwest of al-Arish, near the Gaza Strip, 30 people were killed and more than 25 wounded. Among them were several senior officers from Egypt’s Second Field Army based in Ismailia.  One Sinai-based official said a rocket-propelled grenade was used to target two armored vehicles loaded with ammunition and heavy weapons, at a checkpoint near an army installation. Later, gunmen opened fire on a checkpoint in al-Arish, killing three members of the security forces.

 

Together the two attacks produced the biggest loss of life in decades for Egypt's army, which has been carrying out an offensive against jihadists in northern Sinai. Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi declared three days of national mourning, during which state television displayed black ribbons on screen. Following a meeting of the National Defence Council, he also imposed a three-month state of emergency in the north and center of the Sinai peninsula where the violence took place, and closed Egypt's Rafah crossing into the Gaza Strip. In short, Egypt now acknowledges that the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip has become one of the region's main exporters of terrorism, and is mounting a major offensive aimed at overcoming the threat and re-establishing effective control. Its aim is to establish a security buffer zone along its shared border with Gaza to prevent terrorists from using smuggling tunnels to launch attacks on Egyptian soldiers and civilians. The Egyptian army's security crackdown includes imposing a curfew on the region, closing the Rafah crossing into Gaza, demolishing hundreds of houses along the border with the Gaza Strip and transferring thousands of people to new locations.  In other words – words familiar from their frequent use in castigating Israel – the Egyptians are tightening their blockade on Gaza and collectively punishing not only Hamas, but the Palestinians living there…

 

Meanwhile, following the firing of a rocket from Gaza into southern Israel on November 2 – the second since the end of Operation Protective Edge on August 26 – Israel has also closed the Erez and Kerem Shalom crossings to Gaza “until the security situation allows their reopening”, according to an Israeli Defense Ministry spokesperson, who added that the closure was not meant as a punitive measure, but to protect people working at or passing through the crossings. Emergency humanitarian goods would continue to be allowed through. Hamas leader Musa Abu Marzouk declared that the Israeli closure of the crossings violates the cease-fire agreement which ended Operation Protective Edge, and called the decision “a childish and irresponsible act. This is collective punishment that is being imposed on the Gaza Strip.”  But Hamas leaders like the Egyptian actions even less.  On November 2 they appealed to the Egyptian authorities to reopen the Rafah border crossing, warning that the continued blockade on the Gaza Strip was in violation of the Egyptian-engineered cease-fire between Hamas and Israel.  Eyad al-Bazam, spokesman for Hamas’s Interior Ministry, pointed out that the closure of the Rafah terminal was preventing Palestinians with humanitarian cases from leaving the Gaza Strip.

 

However, Egypt is convinced that the two-pronged attack on October 24 that killed 33 soldiers was the work of Palestinian militants based in Gaza.  Egypt’s Major General Sameeh Beshadi told the Arab newspaper, Asharq Al-Awsat, that there was “no doubt that Palestinian elements had taken part in the attacks."  According to Beshadi, the militants, who infiltrated Sinai via tunnels linking the peninsula to the Gaza Strip, prepared the booby-trapped vehicle used to attack the army checkpoint near El Arish. The use of rocket-propelled grenades and mortars, he asserted, was proof that this attack, like all the large-scale attacks in the area in recent years "involved well-trained Palestinian elements."

 

Just at the moment Hamas needs Egypt much more than Egypt needs Hamas.  Hamas’s ability to emerge with any credit from its latest conflict with Israel is dependent on the outcome of the indirect Israeli-Palestinian talks on the Gaza truce, being brokered by Egypt in Cairo. It must therefore feel very uncomfortable with the result of the recent terrorist outrage in Sinai – namely, Egypt’s postponement of the latest round of talks until late-November.  This may explain why Hamas has denied that its operatives were responsible for firing the rocket that hit the Eshkol region of southern Israel last week, and has arrested five men it accuses of the attack. Perhaps Egypt can succeed where Israel has notably failed – in convincing the leaders of Hamas that terrorism is a two-edged weapon that can bring an unwelcome retribution down on its perpetrators.                                                                       

                                                                       

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EGYPT'S WAR ON TERRORISM:

WORLD'S DOUBLE STANDARDS                                                        

Khaled Abu Toameh                                                                                                     

Gatestone Institute, Nov. 3, 2014

                            

Three months after the military conformation between Hamas and Israel, the Egyptians are also waging their own war on terrorism in north Sinai. But Egypt's war, which began after Islamist terrorists butchered 33 Egyptian soldiers, does not seem to worry the international community and human rights organizations, at least not as much as Israel's operation to stop rockets and missiles from being fired into it from the Gaza Strip.

 

The Egyptian army's security crackdown includes the demolition of hundreds of houses along the border with the Gaza Strip and the transfer of thousands of people to new locations. Egypt's goal is to establish a security buffer zone along its shared border with the Gaza Strip in order to prevent terrorists from using smuggling tunnels to launch attacks on Egyptian soldiers and civilians. In other words, the Egyptians are tightening the blockade on the Gaza Strip and collectively punishing the Palestinians living there, not only Hamas.

 

All this is happening before eyes of the international community and media. Nonetheless, the UN Security Council has not been asked to hold an emergency meeting to condemn what some Egyptian human rights activists describe as the "transfer" and "displacement" of hundreds of families in Sinai. Egyptian lawyer and human rights activist Gamal Eid said that the Egyptian security measures were "unconstitutional." He noted that Article 63 of the Egyptian constitution prohibits the forcible and arbitrary transfer of citizens in all forms. Egyptian security experts warned this week that the "displacement" of Sinai residents would not stop terrorist attacks on the Egyptian police and army.

 

Former General Safwat al-Zayyat said he expected the terrorists to intensify their attacks not only in Sinai but also in other parts of Egypt, including Cairo, to prove that the Egyptian army's measures are ineffective. He also predicted that the transfer of thousands of families and the demolition of their homes would play into the hands of the terrorists. Egyptian activist Massad Abu Fajr wrote on his Facebook page that the forcible eviction of families from their homes in Egypt was tantamount to a "declaration of war by the Egyptian authorities" on the three largest and powerful clans in Sinai. He too predicted that the security crackdown would boomerang and further strengthen the terrorists.

 

But what is perhaps more worrying is the fear that the unprecedented security clampdown in Egypt will drive Hamas and other terror groups in the Gaza Strip to resume their attacks on Israel. The Egyptians, of course, are entitled to wage a ruthless war on the various terror groups that have long been operating in Sinai. However, by tightening the blockade on the Gaza Strip, the Egyptians are also giving Hamas and Islamic Jihad an excuse to resume their attacks on Israel. The two Palestinian terror groups are not going to retaliate by attacking Egypt. They know that Egypt's response to such an attack would be more severe than Israel's military response. That explains why Hamas and other Palestinian groups have been cautious in their response to Egypt's measures — no condemnations or protests thus far. In fact, Hamas is already in a state of panic in the wake of allegations by some Egyptians that Palestinians from the Gaza Strip were involved in the killing of the soldiers in Sinai.

 

Once again, Egyptian journalists are calling on their president to go after Hamas in response to the Sinai attack. A previous attack on Egyptian soldiers in Sinai earlier this year prompted similar calls. Reham Noaman, a prominent Egyptian journalist, called on Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to "crush" Hamas and its armed wing, Ezaddin al-Qassam. "Israel is not better than us," she said. "When Israel wants to hit Hamas because of a rocket that is not worth a penny, it does not seek permission from the Security Council."

 

The Egyptians have finally realized that the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip has become one of the region's main exporters of terrorism. Israel reached this conclusion several years ago, when Hamas and other terror groups began firing rockets and missiles at Israeli communities. The Egyptians have also come to learn that the smuggling tunnels along their shared border with the Gaza Strip work in both directions. In the past, the Egyptians believed that the tunnels were being used only to smuggle weapons into the Gaza Strip. Now, however, they are convinced that these tunnels are also being used to smuggle weapons and terrorists out of the Gaza Strip. Now that the Egyptians have chosen completely to seal off their border with the Gaza Strip, the chances of another military confrontation between Hamas and Israel have increased. Hamas will undoubtedly try to break out of its increased isolation by initiating another war with Israel.

 

The Egyptians, for their part, are not going to mind if another war breaks out between the Palestinians and Israel — as long as the military confrontation is taking place on the other side of the Gaza Strip's border with Egypt. And of course, the international community will once again rush to accuse Israel of "genocide" against the Palestinians in the Gaza Strip. Needless to say, the international community will continue to ignore Egypt's bulldozing hundreds of homes and the forcible eviction of thousands of people in Sinai. If anything, the Egyptian security crackdown in Sinai has once again exposed the double standards of the international community toward the war on terrorism. While it is fine for Egypt to demolish hundreds of houses and forcibly transfer thousands of people in the name of the war on terrorism, Israel is not allowed to fire back at those who launch rockets and missiles at its civilians.

 

                                                                       

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HUNGER GROWLS IN EGYPT                                                                                  

Daniel Pipes

Washington Times, Oct. 6, 2014

 

Egypt, famed for millennia as the “breadbasket of the Mediterranean,” now faces alarming food shortages. A startlingly candid report in Cairo’s Al-Ahram newspaper by Gihan Shahine, titled “Food for Stability,” makes clear the extent of the crisis. To begin, two anecdotes: Although compelled by her father to marry a cousin who could afford to house and feed her, Samar, 20, reports that they “have only had fried potatoes and aubergines for dinner most of the week.” Her sisters, 10 and 13, who left school to take up work, are losing weight and suffer chronic anemia. Manual, a nurse and single mother of four, cannot feed her children. “In the past, we used to stuff cabbage with rice and eat that when we did not have any money. But now even this sometimes can be unaffordable because of rising prices. Our children were always malnourished, but it’s getting even worse.”

 

These children are not unusual: According to the United Nations World Food Program, malnutrition stunts 31 percent of Egyptian children between six months and five years of age, one of the highest rates in the world. The World Food Program also found in 2009 that malnutrition reduced Egypt’s gross domestic product (GDP) by about 2 percent. One in five Egyptians faces food insecurity and “a growing number of people can’t afford to purchase enough nutritious food,” according to Australia’s Future Directions International. To fill their stomachs, Egypt’s poor rely on low-nutrition, calorie-dense foods (such as the infamous all-starch kushari) that cause both nutritional deficiencies and obesity. Also, 5.2 percent of the population is actually going hungry, an Egyptian state agency, CAPMAS, reports.

 

Many factors contribute to Egypt’s hunger crisis. Going from the deepest to the most superficial, these include: Flawed government policies: Cairo has consistently favored urban over rural areas, leading to reduced agricultural research, a lack of financial support, private-sector monopolies, cockeyed subsidies, smuggling, corruption and black markets. Farmers suffer from shortages of expensive yet inferior seeds, fertilizers and pesticides. Most pernicious of all has been the reduction in cultivated land owing to the government’s complicity in unconstrained and illegal residential sprawl.

 

Reliance on food imports: Historically self-sufficient, Egypt now, according to Future Directions International, imports 60 percent of its food. The country remains largely self-sufficient in fruit and vegetables, but depends heavily on foreign grains, sugar, meat and edible oils. Egypt imports two-thirds of its wheat (10 million tons of a total of 15 million, making it the world’s largest importer of wheat), 70 percent of its beans, and 99 percent of its lentils. Not coincidentally, lentil cultivation has dropped from 85,000 acres to below 1,000 acres. Largesse from friendly oil-exporting states of about $20 billion in 2013 has been crucial to fund food imports, but one must wonder for how long this subsidy will continue.

 

Poverty: Such dependence on fluctuating international markets is ever more risky as Egypt becomes increasingly destitute. The previous average of 6.2 percent real GDP growth fell to 2.1 percent in 2012-13, the World Food Program reports. Unemployment stands at about 19 percent. The cotton harvest, once the pride of Egypt, saw a production decline of more than 11 percent in a single marketing year, 2012 to 2013. Twenty-eight percent of young people live in poverty and 24 percent live just above the poverty line, CAPMAS reports, an increase of 1 percent in a single year.

 

Water scarcity: The gift of the Nile is already insufficient by 20 billion cubic meters annually because of such factors as a growing population and inefficient irrigation, reducing Egypt’s food production, and with new dams under construction on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia, yet more severe shortages will follow within the decade.

 

Recent crises: Future Directions International notes “the avian influenza epidemic in 2006, the food, fuel and financial crises of 2007-09, the 2010 global food-price spike, and the economic deterioration caused by political instability since the 2011 Revolution.”

 

Can the new government of Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi respond in time to reverse these calamitous trends? I am pessimistic. Millions of volatile Cairenes have far greater political clout than the more numerous farmers quietly tending their fields. Moreover, urgent issues — from discontented factory workers to a Muslim Brotherhood rebellion to a Hamas-Israel cease-fire — invariably distract the leadership’s attention from long-term systemic crises such as food production. Starvation in Egypt is yet another of the Middle East’s many deep, endemic problems — problems which outsiders cannot solve, only protect themselves from.

 

Daniel Pipes is a CIJR Academic Fellow

 

 

Contents           

 

On Topic

 

Mubarak ‘Not Guilty’ Ruling Signals the End of Egypt’s Arab Spring: Araminta Wordsworth, National Post, Dec. 1, 2014—Since the heady days of the 2011 Arab Spring, they’ve gone from the military dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak, through democracy of a kind with the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohammed Morsi, and back to military dictatorship under Mubarak sidekick Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi.

“Terrorism” in Egypt: Elliott Abrams, Council on Foreign Relations, Dec. 1, 2014—There are acts of terror in Egypt, and there are terrorists–including some linked to Al Qaeda and ISIS.

Egypt Plans Blanket Anti-Terrorism Law Against 'Disrupting Order': Stuart Wilner, Times of Israel, Nov. 26, 2014—Egypt's cabinet approved on Wednesday a draft anti-terrorism law that would give the government blanket power to ban groups on charges ranging from harming national unity to disrupting public order.

In Egypt, Jihadists Release Video of an October Attack: Kareem Fahim & Merna Thomas, New York Times, Nov. 15, 2014 — Egypt’s most lethal jihadist group has released a video that appears to show its militants carrying out an attack that killed more than 31 soldiers in the Sinai Peninsula last month, raising new questions about the readiness of the government’s troops to confront the insurgency.

 

               

 

 

 

                      

                

                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Peut-On Combattre le Terrorisme? Quelques Réponses…

 

 

 

 

 

ÉLOGE DE LA LUTTE ANTITERRORISTE MUSCLÉE DE LA VILLE DE NEW YORK
Daniel Pipes
National Review Online, 13 septembre 2011
Version originale anglaise: In Praise of NYC's Muscular Counterterrorism
Adaptation française: Anne-Marie Delcambre de Champvert

 

Les organismes américains d'application de la loi ont généralement réagi au 11 septembre par une politique antiterroriste de faux-semblant. Ils continuent d'insister sur le fait que désigner l'islamisme comme l'ennemi crée le terrorisme, que la violence islamiste ne menace pas plus que celle des néo-nazis, celle des suprématistes raciaux, et celle tous les autres de ce genre, et que l'antiterrorisme implique principalement de prendre des mesures de bien-être telles que l'amélioration des droits civils, le vote de lois interdisant la discrimination, et la manifestation de bonne volonté envers les islamistes.

 

Et puis il y a le Département de la police de New York, une institution particulièrement incitée par le 11 septembre à renoncer à son ancien laxisme et à devenir sérieuse. La force qui avait mal géré les incidents terroristes antérieurs (par exemple, l'assassinat de Meir Kahane) s'est rapidement transformée en une exceptionnelle agence de lutte contre le terrorisme sous la direction remarquable de Raymond Kelly. (Andrew McCarthy l'appelle une «aubaine»). Contrairement à d'autres institutions d'application de la loi, le Département de la Police de New York nomme l'ennemi, reconnaît la menace prédominante de la violence islamiste, et a construit une solide entreprise de renseignement.

 

Le public a vu les premiers signes de ces changements en 2006, au cours du procès de Shahawar Martin Siraj, le Shahawar Matin Siraj trial. Le gouvernement a condamné Siraj, un immigré pakistanais en situation irrégulière ayant planifié de faire sauter une station de métro, sur la base d'informations provenant de deux espions musulmans du Département de la Police de la ville de New York: un informateur rémunéré de la police, Oussama Eldawoody, et un policier en civil agissant sous le pseudonyme d'infiltration «Kamil Pasha», Ce dernier a témoigné au sujet de son service qui était d'être une «caméra ambulante» parmi les musulmans vivant à Brooklyn, pour «observer, être les oreilles et les yeux» pour le Département de la Police de New York.

 

Christopher Dickey a fourni toutes les photos des réalisations du Département dans un livre de 2009, Sécurisation de la ville: à l'intérieur de la meilleure force d'antiterrorisme d'Amérique – Le Département de la Police de New York (NYPD). Maintenant, juste à temps pour le 10e anniversaire du 11 septembre, l'Associated Press a publié une série d'enquêtes fébriles réalisées par Adam Goldman sur les méthodes du Département, en se concentrant sur la coopération du Département de la Police de New York avec l'Agence centrale de renseignement, mettant ainsi le département sous une surveillance politique intense.

 

Goldman rapporte que le département a dépêché des agents dans les quartiers pakistanais et «leur a ordonné de chercher des raisons pour arrêter les voitures: excès de vitesse, feux arrière cassés, des stops brûlés, peu importe la raison. L'arrêt de la circulation a donné à la police l'occasion de fouiller pour trouver des mandats d'arrêt non exécutés, ou rechercher des suspects. Une arrestation pouvait être l'effet de levier nécessaire dont avait besoin la police pour persuader quelqu'un de devenir un informateur.» Le Département de la Police de New York a créé une Unité «The Terrorist Interdiction Unit» pour gérer ces informateurs, y compris les «crawlers», [ceux qui passent tout leur temps à la mosquée ou au café] «les piliers de mosquées», «les piliers de bistrot», les commerçants et les voisins curieux.

 

Il a créé l'Unité des services spéciaux pour gérer les opérations en dehors de la ville de New York, là où le Département de la ville de New York n'a pas compétence, et cela inclut plusieurs états américains et onze pays étrangers. L'effort a payé; par exemple, un officier musulman du Département de la Police de New York infiltré dans le New Jersey a eu un rôle majeur dans l'Operation Arabian Knight, l'arrestation de juin 2010 de deux musulmans du New Jersey qui ont plaidé coupable pour avoir projeté de rejoindre le groupe terroriste somalien al-Shabab et ensuite de tuer des soldats américains.

 

Il a également créé L'Unité de données démographiques pour «dresser la carte ethnique là où habitent les communautés dans une aire qui couvre les trois États [du New Jersey, du Connecticut et de New York]» et envoyer des policiers en civil pour collecter les informations, les rakers, [les «ratisseurs» d'informations] pour tenir à l'œil les musulmans. Composée de 16 officiers [aux compétences linguistiques multiples; parmi eux il en est qui parlent l'arabe, le bengali, l'hindi, le punjabi et l'ourdou, l'unité dresse la liste de 29 «ascendances présentant un intérêt», toutes essentiellement musulmanes, y compris l'une qui est décrite comme ascendance «musulman noir américain». En tout, le Département de la Police de New York a identifié 263 de ce qu'il appelle «les points chauds [dûs à l'appartenance] ethnique(s)» de la ville, ainsi que 53 «mosquées qui posent problème».

 

Les rakers remplissent des rapports quotidiens sur la vie dans les quartiers musulmans de New York. Goldman et son coauteur Matt Apuzzo remarquent qu'ils «ont visité les librairies et les cafés, les entreprises et les clubs islamiques. La Police a cherché les entreprises qui ont attiré certaines minorités, comme les compagnies de taxi embauchant des Pakistanais.» Ils se sont occupés individuellement des personnes, continue Goldman: «Si un collecteur d'informations remarquait un client [dans une librairie ethnique] regardant la littérature [musulmane]radicale, il pouvait aborder le propriétaire du magasin et voir ce qu'il pouvait apprendre. La librairie ou même le client, pouvaient faire l'objet d'un examen plus approfondi.»

 

Goldman et l'Associated Press, c'est clair, méprisent les tactiques du Département de la police de New York et espèrent les neutraliser. Mais ces tactiques ont protégé New York de treize complots terroristes qui ont échoué ou été contrecarrés, le commissaire de police divisionnaire Kelly s'y tient, et elles recueillent un large soutien politique. Le maire de la ville de New York Michael Bloomberg a fait l'éloge du Département de la Police de New York pour son «très bon travail» et John Brennan, conseiller antiterroriste de Barack Obama, a salué son «travail héroïque.» Le Député américain Peter King (Républicain de New York) a recommandé ses méthodes comme un modèle [à suivre] pour le gouvernement fédéral.

 

King a raison: toutes les autres organisations occidentales d'application de la loi devraient adopter l'approche de la «meilleure force antiterroriste de l'Amérique.»

 

LA DÉPRAVATION DES NATIONS UNIES
Isi Leibler
france-israel.org, 15 septembre 2011

 

Le 20 septembre, la vaste majorité des 193 pays membres des Nations Unies vont probablement «reconnaître» un État palestinien.

 

La "reconnaissance" ne sera pas accompagnée de mises en garde sur le démantèlement des organisations terroristes de l'AP comme les 'Brigades des Martyrs d'Al-Aksa' ou la fin de l'incitation à la haine et au meurtre de Juifs et d'Israéliens qui envahit tous les niveaux de la société palestinienne. Il n'y aura aucune demande de démilitarisation. Pas plus que les négociations de l'AP pour s'unir avec le Hamas génocidaire ne seront entravées. Les Palestiniens ne seront pas obligés de reconnaître Israël comme un État juif et continueront d'exiger le droit des Arabes d'y retourner.

 

La reprise de négociations avec Israël est improbable parce que les Palestiniens réalisent que leurs objectifs peuvent être plus efficacement atteints en faisant monter la pression internationale sur nous pour que nous fassions davantage de concessions unilatérales – et nous démanteler par étapes.

 

Cet épisode sera suivi par Durban III, un festival de haine soutenu par l'ONU conçu pour délégitimer et diaboliser l'État juif. Le principal participant sera le président iranien Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, qui a prédit récemment que la reconnaissance par l'ONU d'un État palestinien représentera la première étape vers l'élimination inévitable de l'État juif. Comme les précédentes réunions en 2001 et 2009, cette soi-disant «conférence antiraciste» se concentrera essentiellement sur le crachat de venin sur Israël.

 

Les fondateurs des Nations Unies, qui après la défaite du nazisme, ont adopté la Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l'Homme, n'auraient jamais pu entrevoir que l'organisation qu'ils ont créée deviendrait contrôlée par des dictatures et des tyrannies et serait transformée en une plateforme de promotion du génocide.

 

Cela a été illustré par le représentant libyen servant de président de l'assemblée Générale de l'ONU en 2009, suivi en juillet de la même année par le Qatar avec l'Iran comme vice-président; le président génocidaire iranien Mahmoud Ahmadinejad s'est adressé de façon répétée à l'Assemblée Générale comme un hôte honorable; la Corée du Nord, proliférateur connue d'armes nucléaires, a été élue pour présider la Conférence sur le Désarmement; et l'Iran, trop fameuse pour la lapidation de femmes pour adultère, a été nommée à la Commission de l'ONU sur le Statut des Femmes. 

 

Mais rien ne surpasse l'étrange Conseil des Droits de l'Homme de l'ONU, dont 80 % des membres, selon l'index de 'Freedom House' de 2010, est composé de pays «non libres» ou partiellement libres. Sans surprise, des canailles sont nommées à des positions d'autorité. Ainsi nous avons Richard Falk, le rapporteur spécial de l'ONU sur les droits de l'homme dans les territoires palestiniens, qui a déclaré que les USA ont soutenu et exécuté les attaques du 11 septembre 2001, et qui a aussi récemment mis en ligne un dessin animé antisémite sur son site Internet. Son Comité consultatif est présidé par la marocaine Halima Warzawi, qui avait auparavant bloqué une tentative de condamnation de Saddam Hussein pour avoir gazé 30.000 Kurdes.  Il comprend aussi le suisse Jean Ziegler, qui a fait l'éloge de  Fidel Castro et du dictateur du Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe; il est le cofondateur du «Prix Khaddafi International pour les Droits de l'Homme» – dont les récipiendaires comprennent le négationniste de l'Holocauste Roger Garaudy, Louis Farrakhan et Hugo Chavez.

 

Le bavardage sur les droits de l'homme initié par des États tyranniques qui infligent de monstrueuses injustices à leur propre peuple représente l'hypocrisie ultime. Les exemples abondent: la Libye a mis en avant une motion «pour mettre fin à toutes formes de discrimination raciale»; l'Iran a appelé les USA  à assurer l'application de la loi humanitaire internationale; La Chine a exigé de mettre fin à la «force excessive par des organes d'application de la loi»; et la Corée du Nord a appelé à l'interdiction de la torture.

 

Dans ce Conseil des Droits de l'Homme dégénéré de l'ONU, un environnement de pogrom domine, avec 70 % de toutes les résolutions dirigées contre Israël.

 

Cela s'applique aussi à l'Assemblée Générale, où la diabolisation, la délégitimation et l'attribution de tous les malheurs du monde à l'État juif sont une réminiscence du Moyen Age, où l'on reprochait aux Juifs d'être la source principale de tous les maux auxquels l'humanité était confrontée.

 

Daniel Pipes estime que le nombre total de morts dans les conflits mondiaux depuis 1950 dépasse 85 millions.

 

Les 50.000 morts du conflit arabo-israélien comptent ainsi pour moins de 0.05 % du total. A ce jour, alors que des centaines de milliers de gens à travers le monde sont massacrés ou se voient refuser les droits humains élémentaires, l'ONU hypocrite n'a pas commandé de rapport d'une quelconque Commission Goldstone pour enquêter sur de tels massacres, mais elle consacre sans vergogne la plus grande part de son énergie à condamner les implantations israéliennes ou les constructions dans la Jérusalem juive.

 

Hélas, d'abord du fait de la 'Real Politik', les pays de l'Europe des «lumières» – dont le sol  est gorgé de sang juif depuis 2.000 ans, avec la culmination de l'Holocauste –sont au mieux, enclins à s'abstenir, mais plus récemment, ils ont adopté des résolutions anti-israéliennes primaires.

 

Aussi comment devons-nous répondre au vote à venir sur l'État palestinien? Nous devons nous mettre d'accord ensemble sur le fait que nous ne parviendrons jamais à la justice aux Nations Unies. La combinaison de pays islamiques, d'États voyous et de dictatures garantit que les résolutions les plus extrémistes contre Israël seront toujours largement soutenues.

 

Reprocher au Premier ministre Benyamin Netanyahou l'état des affaires publiques parce qu'il n'est pas parvenu à un «plan» est tout simplement de la démagogie politique primitive. Quel «plan» au-delà de concessions unilatérales suicidaires pourrait être conçu pour satisfaire les Palestiniens? Mais nous ne devons pas paniquer. Malgré la politique actuelle du président Barack Obama de négociation et de conciliation avec les extrémistes et les États islamiques, les USA empêcheront presque certainement le conseil de Sécurité de l'ONU d'imposer des sanctions et des boycotts contre Israël. 

 

Contrairement aux remarques hystériques récentes du ministre de la défense Ehud Barak, cela n'est pas un "tsunami diplomatique", et nous devons prendre avantage de la plateforme de l'ONU pour porter le dossier d'Israël à nos amis et alliés.

 

Nous devons garder à l'esprit que l'Assemblée Générale de l'ONU peut faire des proclamations, mais elle ne peut pas «créer» un État ou changer le statut sur place. A côté de cela, en l'absence de la protection de Tsahal à l'AP corrompue – un Hamastan génocidaire la chasserait – situation que même la plupart des pays européens ne souhaitent pas imposer à la région.

 

Aujourd'hui, la plupart des Israéliens accepteraient un État palestinien – à condition que les Palestiniens  répondent aux questions mentionnées dans le paragraphe liminaire de cet article. Jusqu'à ce qu'Abbas veuille bien reconnaître l'État juif et renoncer au «droit de retour», même Obama sera obligé d'exercer le veto américain au Conseil de Sécurité. Et si les Palestiniens recourent à la violence – Abbas a appelé à une «résistance populaire du type du Printemps Arabe» – nous devons nous préparer à vaincre nos adversaires comme nous l'avons fait dans le passé.

 

Du côté positif, il y a des grondements au Congrès des États Unis reflétant une frustration fondamentale pour les 7.7 milliards de $ de fonds prélevés sur les contribuables américains et fournis à l'ONU, en dépit du fait que les objectifs originaux et nobles de l'Organisme mondial ont été inversés et qu'il a été transformé en une organisation dépravée.

 

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, présidente de la puissante Commission des Affaires Etrangères du Parlement au Congrès, maintient que l'ONU n'a plus aucune crédibilité comme force de paix au Moyen-Orient. Elle s'oppose «au paiement par les USA d'un cinquième des factures de l'ONU pour ses activités anti-israéliennes  comprenant le Conseil des Droits de l'Homme, une galerie de voyous dominée par des transgresseurs des droits de l'homme qui en use pour ignorer les véritables abus et s'attaquer à la place de façon incessante à Israël».

 

Elle remarque que «à l'ONU, l'argent parle et la rétention [d'information] fonctionne», remarquant qu'en 1989 Yasser Arafat pressa pour être membre à l'ONU en tant qu' «État palestinien», mais son initiative fut stoppée aussitôt quand l'administration de George H.W. Bush (le père) menaça de couper le financement des USA à toute entité de l'ONU qui augmenterait le niveau du statut de la mission palestinienne.

 

Elle a conclu qu'avec l'administration Obama refusant d'augmenter le financement américain pour défendre les intérêts des USA, le Congrès doit combler le fossé. Ainsi le 30 août, avec 57 co-signataires, elle a soumis le projet de loi de Réforme, de Responsabilité et de Transparence des Nations Unies, qui mettra fin aux contributions des USA à toute entité de l'ONU élevant le statut de la mission palestinienne.

 

La loi demandera aussi que les USA se dissocient et cessent de financer le Conseil des Droits de l'Homme jusqu'à ce qu'il abroge sa résolution anti-israélienne permanente. La loi gèlera les contributions aux activités de l'ONU liées au rapport diffamatoire Goldstone et au festival de haine de Durban, et elle suspendra le soutien à l'UNWRA jusqu'à ce qu'elle ait cessé d'employer des terroristes.

 

Ros-Lehtinen a déclaré qu'elle promouvait cette résolution «au nom de notre allié Israël et de toutes les démocraties libres, au nom de la paix et de la sécurité. Et afin de parvenir à une ONU qui respecte ses principes fondateurs». […]

 

…[L]e fait qu'une telle résolution puisse être soumis par la présidente de la Commission des affaires étrangères du congrès démontre une frustration croissante par rapport à l'ONU, qui pourrait plus tôt que prévu conduire à une confrontation  avec cette odieuse organisation.

 

Le Congrès est le phare brillant dans la difficulté actuelle à laquelle nous nous faisons face. A long terme, alors que le public américain perd de plus en plus ses illusions au sujet de l'attitude obséquieuse de l'administration Obama envers l'ONU décadente et partiale, il y a l'espoir que l'intervention du congrès réussira en définitive dans l'usage de l'influence des USA pour mettre fin à un comportement aussi scandaleux.  

 

Pendant ce temps, nous devons rester résolus et tenir fermes.

 

VIVE L’OCCIDENT?
Mathieu Bock-Côté
Le Journal de Montréal, 15 septembre 2011

Paradoxal: alors que la commémoration des attentats du 11 septembre aurait dû inspirer un peu partout une sympathie renouvelée pour les États-Unis, c’est plutôt à une flambée d’antiaméricanisme que nous assistons. Un concours est lancé: c’est à qui relativisera le plus les attentats.

 

La formule revient en boucle: 3000 morts, ce n’est rien! Certains vont plus loin: les Américains l’auraient bien cherché. L’Amérique n’est-elle pas coupable d’exactions bien plus considérables, et cela, sur une base quotidienne?

 

J’ai même entendu récemment à la radio qu’on ne saurait distinguer clairement entre les agresseurs et les agressés dans le cas du 11 septembre. Et il y a quelques jours, des zozos ont profité du 11 septembre pour bruler dans les rues de Montréal le drapeau américain. L’antiaméricanisme est la seule forme de xénophobie socialement acceptable.

Ce que ne parviennent pas à comprendre ces fins esprits, c’est que c’est l’Occident dans son ensemble qui était visé. D’ailleurs, dans les années qui ont suivi, plusieurs grandes métropoles ont été la cible du terrorisme. Londres et Madrid, notamment. Chaque fois, on visait les civils. Chaque fois, on voulait créer la terreur, en tuant au hasard. On sait aussi que Montréal a déjà été sur la liste, soit dit en passant.

 

Pourquoi les sociétés occidentales sont-elles habitées par un tel sentiment de culpabilité? On connaît la chanson. L’Occident serait raciste. Il serait sexiste. Puis homophobe. Impérialiste et colonialiste. Oui, tout cela! Sans oublier que l’Occident détruirait la planète en saccageant l’environnement. Faites l’histoire des derniers siècles, il n’y aurait qu’un responsable: l’Occidental bedonnant. Coupable!

 

Les juges les plus implacables du monde occidental sont souvent occupés à faire les yeux doux aux tyrans d’ailleurs dans le monde. Ce qu’ils condamnent chez nous, ils l’excusent chez les autres. Au temps de la guerre froide, ils étaient les premiers à se faire payer le voyage dans les paradis communistes qui étaient pourtant d’implacables tyrannies bureaucratiques.

 

Nos sociétés ne sont évidemment pas parfaites. Mais elles ne sont certainement pas responsables de tout le mal du monde. La mauvaise conscience est un fantasme destructeur. Bien au contraire, il serait temps de redécouvrir les vertus de la civilisation occidentale. De se rappeler qu’elle mérite d’être défendue contre ceux qui la dénigrent abusivement.

 

Pensons seulement à la liberté d’expression et à la démocratie. La première est souvent contestée, la seconde devrait être prise plus au sérieux. Pourtant, grâce aux deux, les sociétés occidentales ont créé les conditions des progrès scientifiques, économiques, politiques et moraux de notre temps. La société occidentale est une société de liberté.

 

C’est ce qui exaspère les fanatiques qui voudraient voir leurs dogmes régner partout sur terre. Nous réclamons en Occident le droit de contester tous les dogmes. Et nous savons à quel point ce droit est fondamental. Les fins esprits qui détestent leur propre civilisation à l’abri de sa démocratie devraient se le rappeler.

 

Dix ans après le 11 septembre, il ne sert à rien de se rougir les genoux en jouant à la pénitence. L’autocritique? Oui. La haine de soi? Non. L’heure est peut-être venue d’une saine fierté occidentale. Au Québec, cela nous ferait du bien.