Tag: Reasonable Accommodations

WITH A LIKELY PQ MAJORITY LOOMING, AND THE CONSTANT THREAT OF THE DRACONIAN “CHARTER,” WILL JEWS CONTINUE EXODUS FROM QUEBEC?

We welcome your comments to this and any other CIJR publication. Please address your response to:  Rob Coles, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish Research, PO Box 175, Station  H, Montreal QC H3G 2K7 – Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284; E-mail: rob@isranet.org



                                           

Who Will Speak Up For Minority Rights in Quebec?: Andrew Coyne, National Post, Jan. 24, 2014— Discussion of the Parti Québécois’ “Charter of Quebec Values” has until now been conducted rather on the same lines as discussion of a third referendum: as a theoretical possibility, but not an immediate likelihood.

Values Charter Could ‘Devastate’ Community: David Lazarus, Canadian Jewish News, Jan. 26, 2014 — Young Jews will seriously consider leaving Quebec if the Parti Québecois (PQ) forms a majority in the next provincial election and the proposed charter of values becomes law, predicts one of the country’s best-known demographers.

Quebec Charter Can’t Turn Back Demographic Clock 100 Years: Jason Moscovitz, Ottawa Jewish Bulletin, Feb. 14, 2014— I have this sick feeling. Not because the Parti Québécois (PQ) will soon call a Quebec provincial election in which it can win a majority; I feel sick about how the PQ is going to go about it. The Charter of Quebec Values is blossoming as a positive election issue for the PQ.

The PQ’s War Against Faith: Barbara Kay, National Post, Jan. 22, 2014 — It’s not often that we Canadians get to see a show trial in progress. But we’re watching one now — namely, the public hearings on the Quebec government’s proposed Bill 60, popularly known as the Charter of Quebec Values, which would ban religious symbols in the public service to ensure visible neutrality with regard to religious convictions and visible conformity to (Quebec-style) gender equality.

 

On Topic Links

 

Video Shows 'Positive' Criticism of Quebec Charter: Aaron Derfel, Montreal Gazette, Jan. 21, 2014

The PQ Charter and the Jewish Community: Don Macpherson, Montreal Gazette, Jan. 16, 2014

Quebec’s Values Charter Debate Fuels Stereotyping, Tension: Poll: National Post, Jan. 13, 2014

Quebec Business Leaders Sound Warning on PQ Values Charter: Allan Woods, Toronto Star, Feb. 2, 2014

 

 

 

WHO WILL SPEAK UP FOR MINORITY RIGHTS IN QUEBEC?

Andrew Coyne                                                        

National Post, Jan. 24, 2014

 

Discussion of the Parti Québécois’ “Charter of Quebec Values” has until now been conducted rather on the same lines as discussion of a third referendum: as a theoretical possibility, but not an immediate likelihood. The thing was so outlandish, so crude, so ugly in its implications and so obvious in its motives — to this day we have yet to be given a shred of evidence of its necessity — that the consensus was that it was unlikely ever to be put into effect. Quebecers would not stand for this, we told ourselves. It was a throwback to an earlier time, catering to old insecurities, unrepresentative of the Quebec of today. Oh, perhaps it might fly in a few rural backwaters, but never in cosmopolitan Montreal.

 

At any rate, the opposition parties would block it in the legislature. Some watered-down version might pass, an affirmation of the secular character of the Quebec state blah blah blah, but the core of it, the ban on religious garments in the public service — effectively, a ban on religious minorities in the public service — could not possibly become law. Indeed, as more and more hospitals, school boards and municipalities spoke out against Bill 60 (as the legislation is called), as demonstrators marched against it and lawyers denounced it as unconstitutional, and as divisions began to emerge even among Péquistes as to its merits, it seemed increasingly evident the PQ’s desperate gambit — for surely that is what it was — had backfired. Evident, that is, to everyone but the PQ leadership, whose response to this firestorm of opposition was … to tighten the bill further.

 

Well, now, here we are months later, and every one of these wishful myths has been destroyed. The PQ, far from dwindling to a reactionary rump, can now see a majority government within reach: A Léger poll, taken several days after hearings on the bill had begun, put them ahead of the Liberals, 36% to 33% overall, but 43-25 among the francophone population, where elections are won or lost. That wasn’t a tribute to the leadership of Pauline Marois. Neither was there any great surge in support for sovereignty. Rather, it seems clearly to be based on popular support — enthusiasm would perhaps be more apt — for the charter.

 

While nearly half of all Quebecers — 48% — support the bill, according to Léger, that’s almost entirely due to the support it enjoys among francophones, at 57%, compared with just 18% support among the province’s linguistic minorities. The ban on religious garb, in particular, attracts even more support: 60% overall, 69% among francophones — up 11 points since September. And while support is particularly strong outside the metropolitan areas, it is very nearly as strong in Montreal and Quebec City as well.

 

But you don’t need to consult the polls to see how this is playing out. You need only look at how the political parties are reacting. Neither opposition party has come out foursquare against the bill, or even the ban on religious clothing. The Coalition Avenir Québec would restrict its application to persons in positions of authority, such as police officers or judges (as suggested earlier by the Bouchard-Taylor commission on “reasonable accommodation”). Marvellous: so only the minority police officers and judges would be fired.

 

And the Liberals — ah, the Liberals. After dithering for months, while various figures within the party freelanced a range of positions on the issue, the party leader, Philippe Couillard, emerged with a stance of such infinite nuance that it ended up contradicting itself more than the bill. The party would allow public servants to wear the kippa and the hijab, but not the burka and the niqab. OK: the latter two cover the face, which suggests at least some sort of principled underpinning. But then why ban the chador, which does not? Such exquisite parsing has earned the party the ridicule of all sides. With the opposition in disarray, there is growing talk of a spring election, with Bill 60 as its central issue. What once was a theoretical possibility has become a real, and disturbing, probability.

 

By this point, Quebecers can be under no illusion what the bill portends: the expulsion from the public service of thousands of observant Jews, Sikhs, Muslims and even the odd Christian (among the bill’s other anomalies, crucifixes would be permitted, so long as they are not too large), unless they submit to stripping themselves of any outward manifestation of their faith. And the majority seem quite content with this. Rationalize it all we like — a distinctly French approach to secularism, the legacy of Quebec’s Catholic past etc. etc. — but if the polls hold the province is about to elect a separatist majority government, on an explicit appeal to ethnocultural chauvinism. The moral implications of this are profound, and not limited to the province, or its government. They involve us all. Put simply: Is this a state of affairs we can live with in this country? Will our consciences allow it? What, in particular, will be the reaction of the federal government? Will it defend the rights of local minorities, in the role originally envisaged for it, as it has pledged to do? Or will it do as federal governments have done since Laurier, faced with a determined local majority: shrug and abandon them to their fate?

                                                                         

                                                                                   

Contents
                                        

VALUES CHARTER COULD ‘DEVASTATE’ COMMUNITY                      

David Lazarus    

Canadian Jewish News, Jan. 26, 2014

 

Young Jews will seriously consider leaving Quebec if the Parti Québecois (PQ) forms a majority in the next provincial election and the proposed charter of values becomes law, predicts one of the country’s best-known demographers. “It would be naive to think it’s not a serious risk,” said Jack Jedwab, 55, director of the Association for Canadian Studies. Jedwab, who served as director of the Quebec branch of the now-defunct Canadian Jewish Congress from 1988 to 1998, told The CJN that while the province’s Jewish community remains vital and influential, it’s “in a state of serious, serious flux.” But “if this charter thing passes, it could be devastating.”

 

Some 30,000 Jews are believed to have left the province since the PQ formed its first provincial government in 1976. The community’s population now numbers about 90,000. Jedwab said a PQ majority government combined with the passage of Bill 60 would be “a worst-case scenario.” For the Jewish community, the proposed secular charter “is affecting the sense of who we are in society, that we are not equal to our de vieille souche [old stock] co-citizens,” said Jedwab, who is regularly asked to comment on minority issues by French- and English-language news outlets. “It’s coming across as an attack on our identity.”

 

Jedwab said he’s been impressed with the stance taken by the publicly funded Jewish General Hospital, which pledged that it would not enforce a charter rule barring workers from wearing religious symbols on the job. But, like many others, he had no idea how the provincial government would react to the hospital’s civil disobedience. “It’s a major question,” he said…

 

The government is so intent on achieving a majority and getting the charter passed into law by pandering to the province’s most base and xenophobic elements, he said, that it’s “ready to sacrifice its relationship with the Jewish community,” which almost never supports the PQ anyway. It’s clear from the current legislative hearings on Bill 60 that the party is cynically striving to exploit those xenophobic elements and distract from real issues such as the economy, Jedwab said.

 

One of the most troubling aspects of the charter debate for Jedwab is that religious rights are no longer being seen as fundamental or immutable, but as subject to legal manipulation. “It is one of the most worrisome dimensions,” he said. Jedwab is quite familiar with these issues. He was at Congress during the 1995 referendum on sovereignty, when the “No” side barely won and then-PQ premier Jacques Parizeau uttered his infamous comments blaming the “money and ethnic” vote for the razor-thin result. He was also at CJC when the late Quebecor tabloid publisher Pierre Péladeau referred to Quebec’s Jewish community as taking up “too much space,” and when Mordecai Richler suggested that anti-Semitism continued to play a role in Quebec national life. But Jedwab seems more concerned now than previously, saying that the charter is “one of the ugliest initiatives I’ve seen. I’m very, very saddened by the turn of events.”

                                                                                                 

Contents
                                  

QUEBEC CHARTER CAN’T TURN BACK

DEMOGRAPHIC CLOCK 100 YEARS                                              

Jason Moscovitz                                                              

Ottawa Jewish Bulletin, Feb. 14, 2014

 

I have this sick feeling. Not because the Parti Québécois (PQ) will soon call a Quebec provincial election in which it can win a majority; I feel sick about how the PQ is going to go about it. The Charter of Quebec Values is blossoming as a positive election issue for the PQ. Recent polls demonstrate how a growing majority of French Quebecers see the charter as a positive force to bolster their collective rights, emboldening them to almost scream out loud, “They are Quebecers and this is French Quebec.”

 

A few weeks ago, a young woman boarded a plane from New York City to Montreal. She overheard a Québécois couple in conversation about Jewish religious people on the same plane. In French, and not thinking they were being understood, one of them muttered, “I thought we were flying to Montreal not to Israel.” That is the mindset behind the charter.

 

The charter was not as popular when it was first presented six months ago. Even two former Quebec PQ premiers opposed it, as did some nationalist interest groups. They believed proposed legislation eliminating “conspicuous” or overly noticeable religious symbols worn by people in the public sector in Quebec was uncalled for and not worthy of Quebecers. They thought it silly to debate how people serving the public can wear a small crucifix or a small Star of David but not a big one around their neck. They opposed the whole notion of burkas, hijabs, turbans and kippahs being made matters of public policy. What they also knew, but probably wouldn’t say, is how the number of people who actually serve the public with any form of religious garb is so minuscule you would have to ask why any Quebec government would run the risk of having the majority look like heavy-handed bullies.

 

The reason reflects Quebec’s French majority being a minority in North America. Insecurity within that context has always made Quebecers keenly aware of the difference between collective and individual rights. To protect themselves from what they see as a never-ending threat to their language and culture, they believe laws need to be passed sometimes at the expense of individual rights of others. The Charter of Quebec Values follows the template of the Charter of the French Language. The rationale behind both is to protect Quebecers, by protecting their language, their culture and their very existence and growth in Quebec.

 

Perhaps you can better see why that Québécois couple on the Montreal bound plane would ask themselves if they were flying to Montreal or Israel when they saw religious Jews on the plane. You could say they are small-minded xenophobes or you could try to explain it by adding they feel what they feel because the Quebec of their ancestors is, in their minds, threatened. The Charter of Quebec Values may make some Quebecers feel better, but it is not going to change anything concretely. No charter of values can turn the demographic clock back a hundred years. But feeling better is important. Politicians learned a long time ago that the better you make people feel, the more votes you get.

 

The Charter of Quebec Values is not just the product of instant electoral gratification, although it sure looks that way. To be fair, the thinking behind the charter goes back several years to Quebec’s hearings on religious and cultural accommodation. The thinking of that arduous process was accommodation was always possible and desirable in Quebec, as long as limits were set. And that brings us to the beginnings of the legislative word “conspicuous.”

 

Some years back, a rabbi put up a big, “conspicuous” mezuzah in a Montreal condo where few Jews lived. For the record, the other two mezuzahs in the building were small and discreet. Within a month, the condo owner, yours truly, got a call from the administrator of the building. It was a polite and respectful conversation in which I was asked if it were possible to replace the big mezuzah with a small mezuzah. He talked about accommodation. My conclusion, long before the Charter of Quebec Values, was that, if you want a mezuzah in a shared building, make it small so Quebecers can hardly see it, or, perhaps more politely, remember they have a collective right, which enables them to tell you how big they think it should be.

 

                                                                                                 

Contents
                                  

THE PQ’S WAR AGAINST FAITH                                                        

Barbara Kay                                             

National Post, Jan. 22, 2014

 

It’s not often that we Canadians get to see a show trial in progress. But we’re watching one now — namely, the public hearings on the Quebec government’s proposed Bill 60, popularly known as the Charter of Quebec Values, which would ban religious symbols in the public service to ensure visible neutrality with regard to religious convictions and visible conformity to (Quebec-style) gender equality.

 

The outcome of the hearings already is known: Bill 60 will remain unchanged. The show trial’s purpose is to keep Quebec’s francophone populace continuously distracted and tribally pumped until an election is called. Since they cannot win on the usual grounds of good economic management and governance, the Parti Québécois are gambling on fear and ethnic pride as their ticket to power. It could pay off. A new Leger Marketing survey for QMI Agency suggests the PQ is, for the first time, “mathematically in position to win a majority government since their [minority] election [win] in 2012.” Nearly half the respondents reported themselves pleased with the Charter, with support much higher among francophones than other groups.

 

With hostility to the bill largely centralized in multicultural Montreal; with the anti-PQ vote split between two parties (the Liberals and Coalition Avenir Québec, both emanating equivocal, somewhat panicky vibes on the Charter); and with voting power weighted to Quebec’s homogeneously francophone regions: The reality is that Quebec may, through an impeccably democratic process, become a province where self-identifying members of faith communities are second-class citizens when giving and receiving public services.

 

The rationale for the Charter is similar to the thinking behind draconian language laws such as Bill 101. Quebec is a distinct, but vulnerable society, René Lévesque believed, with French the vehicle for Quebec’s unique culture; therefore the “face” of society must be French, with English minimized, to preserve the culture. Following the same logic, overtly expressed religious faith now is perceived as threatening to the secular character of Quebec culture. Bill 60 would neutralize the “face” of Quebec with regard to religious belief, especially belief in traditional gender roles.

 

This is poor reasoning. People may love one language, yet speak many, according to their situation. Language is a means to personal, cultural and transactional ends. But settled convictions are ends in themselves and never interchangeable. So unless a faith symbol actively harms the civic environment, there can be no democratic reason to ban it. (I will concede, however, that the actual covering of one’s face — as opposed to merely one’s hair — is psychologically threatening, and does impede social reciprocity. If the Liberals’ fully justifiable Bill 94, banning face-covering in public services, had been passed, the PQ’s Bill 60’s appeal would have been sharply diminished.) Bans on jewellery and head cover not only change the relationship of individuals to the state; they also transform relations between citizens, creating a hierarchy of civic worthiness in the minds of all, according to which participation in Quebec culture is predicated on the trivialization of faith.

 

Because Quebec’s elites are so hostile to their own Catholic cultural roots (even though cynical politicians have no problem exploiting their former faith’s religious symbols as protected “heritage” symbols in exploiting residual nostalgia amongst older voters), they have lost the capacity to understand faith’s character and its collective resilience when under threat. Politicians should realize that promoting secular conformity through voluntary submission to moral authoritativeness would be a far better path, in the end, than demanding sullen compliance through political authoritarianism.

 

Judaism, Islam and Christianity are the three main religions targeted by the Charter. Adherents of all three who wear faith symbols are precisely those representatives of their religions who are most likely to find meaning in sacred traditions and conventions deriving their authority from the pre-state past, and for whom sexual restraint and the family are the pillars of civilization.

 

How likely are these groups to accept humiliation from political masters whose own “culture” is based in rejection of the religion that created it? How likely are they to respect a “gender equality” ideal that is accompanied by indifference to marriage, widespread family breakdown and high abortion rates? Indeed, to any person of real faith, Quebec’s aggressive secularism seems more a source of cultural malaise than a strength.

 

It’s clear that Bill 60 is a transparently coarse, fear-mongering appeal to the least rational, most xenophobic elements of Quebec’s population. It may come to pass (even if it involves over-riding constitutional barriers with the Charter of Rights’ notwithstanding clause). But if that happens, the PQ may be surprised at the depth of the backlash.

 

Contents

                                                                          

Video Shows 'Positive' Criticism of Quebec Charter: Aaron Derfel, Montreal Gazette, Jan. 21, 2014 —It’s a video that some staunch supporters of the Charter of Quebec Values don’t want you to see. Produced with the full co-operation of the Jewish General Hospital, the video shows moving, compassionate images of health-care workers treating patients — all the while wearing the hijab, kippa and turban.                                                       

The PQ Charter and the Jewish Community: Don Macpherson, Montreal Gazette, Jan. 16, 2014—The Parti Québécois “values” charter would have a “devastating” effect on Quebec’s Jewish community. It could “damage” its “continuity,” and “compromise (its) acquired rights and its future.” And it risks creating “social conflicts.”                                           

Quebec’s Values Charter Debate Fuels Stereotyping, Tension: Poll: National Post, Jan. 13, 2014—As hearings begin Tuesday on the proposed Quebec Charter of Values, a new public opinion poll suggests even some Quebecers who support restrictions on religious symbols in public institutions think the move is already fuelling stereotyping and tension among the province’s communities and is likely to foster civil disobedience.                     

Quebec Business Leaders Sound Warning on PQ Values Charter: Allan Woods, Toronto Star, Feb. 2, 2014 —You know an issue has touched a nerve in Quebec when the business community turns to the microphones and television cameras. The province’s captains of enterprise did it in advance of French-language laws introduced in the 1970s.

 

 

 

 Contents:         

Visit CIJR’s Bi-Weekly Webzine: Israzine.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing is available by e-mail.
Please urge colleagues, friends, and family to visit our website for more information on our ISRANET series.
To join our distribution list, or to unsubscribe, visit us at http://www.isranet.org/.

The ISRANET Daily Briefing is a service of CIJR. We hope that you find it useful and that you will support it and our pro-Israel educational work by forwarding a minimum $90.00 tax-deductible contribution [please send a cheque or VISA/MasterCard information to CIJR (see cover page for address)]. All donations include a membership-subscription to our respected quarterly ISRAFAX print magazine, which will be mailed to your home.

CIJR’s ISRANET Daily Briefing attempts to convey a wide variety of opinions on Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world for its readers’ educational and research purposes. Reprinted articles and documents express the opinions of their authors, and do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research.

 

 

Rob Coles, Publications Chairman, Canadian Institute for Jewish ResearchL'institut Canadien de recherches sur le Judaïsme, www.isranet.org

Tel: (514) 486-5544 – Fax:(514) 486-8284 ; ber@isranet.org

Barbara Kay: the PQ’s War Against Faith

It’s not often that we Canadians get to see a show trial in progress. But we’re watching one now — namely, the public hearings on the Quebec government’s proposed Bill 60, popularly known as the Charter of Quebec Values, which would ban religious symbols in the public service to ensure visible neutrality with regard to religious convictions and visible conformity to (Quebec-style) gender equality.

The outcome of the hearings already is known: Bill 60 will remain unchanged. The show trial’s purpose is to keep Quebec’s francophone populace continuously distracted and tribally pumped until an election is called. Since they cannot win on the usual grounds of good economic management and governance, the Parti Québécois are gambling on fear and ethnic pride as their ticket to power. It could pay off. A new Leger Marketing survey for QMI Agency suggests the PQ is, for the first time, “mathematically in position to win a majority government since their [minority] election [win] in 2012.” Nearly half the respondents reported themselves pleased with the Charter, with support much higher among francophones than other groups.

With hostility to the bill largely centralized in multicultural Montreal; with the anti-PQ vote split between two parties (the Liberals and Coalition Avenir Québec, both emanating equivocal, somewhat panicky vibes on the Charter); and with voting power weighted to Quebec’s homogeneously francophone regions: The reality is that Quebec may, through an impeccably democratic process, become a province where self-identifying members of faith communities are second-class citizens when giving and receiving public services.

The rationale for the Charter is similar to the thinking behind draconian language laws such as Bill 101. Quebec is a distinct, but vulnerable society, René Lévesque believed, with French the vehicle for Quebec’s unique culture; therefore the “face” of society must be French, with English minimized, to preserve the culture. Following the same logic, overtly expressed religious faith now is perceived as threatening to the secular character of Quebec culture. Bill 60 would neutralize the “face” of Quebec with regard to religious belief, especially belief in traditional gender roles.

This is poor reasoning. People may love one language, yet speak many, according to their situation. Language is a means to personal, cultural and transactional ends. But settled convictions are ends in themselves and never interchangeable. So unless a faith symbol actively harms the civic environment, there can be no democratic reason to ban it. (I will concede, however, that the actual covering of one’s face — as opposed to merely one’s hair — is psychologically threatening, and does impede social reciprocity. If the Liberals’ fully justifiable Bill 94, banning face-covering in public services, had been passed, the PQ’s Bill 60’s appeal would have been sharply diminished.) Bans on jewellery and head cover not only change the relationship of individuals to the state; they also transform relations between citizens, creating a hierarchy of civic worthiness in the minds of all, according to which participation in Quebec culture is predicated on the trivialization of faith.

Because Quebec’s elites are so hostile to their own Catholic cultural roots (even though cynical politicians have no problem exploiting their former faith’s religious symbols as protected “heritage” symbols in exploiting residual nostalgia amongst older voters), they have lost the capacity to understand faith’s character and its collective resilience when under threat. Politicians should realize that promoting secular conformity through voluntary submission to moral authoritativeness would be a far better path, in the end, than demanding sullen compliance through political authoritarianism.
Judaism, Islam and Christianity are the three main religions targeted by the Charter. Adherents of all three who wear faith symbols are precisely those representatives of their religions who are most likely to find meaning in sacred traditions and conventions deriving their authority from the pre-state past, and for whom sexual restraint and the family are the pillars of civilization.

How likely are these groups to accept humiliation from political masters whose own “culture” is based in rejection of the religion that created it? How likely are they to respect a “gender equality” ideal that is accompanied by indifference to marriage, widespread family breakdown and high abortion rates? Indeed, to any person of real faith, Quebec’s aggressive secularism seems more a source of cultural malaise than a strength.

It’s clear that Bill 60 is a transparently coarse, fear-mongering appeal to the least rational, most xenophobic elements of Quebec’s population. It may come to pass (even if it involves over-riding constitutional barriers with the Charter of Rights’ notwithstanding clause). But if that happens, the PQ may be surprised at the depth of the backlash.

  [Barbara Kay is a National Post columnist and a CIJR Academic Fellow]

ON MONTE AUX BARRICADES PARCE QUE LE «COACH» NE PARLE PAS FRANÇAIS TANDIS QUE NOUS ACCOMMODONS LA DHIMMIFICATION DES QUÉBÉCOIS.

 

 

 

«LA FÊTE DE NOËL EST ILLICITE» – JOYEUX NOËL MALGRÉ TOUT!
Dépêche

Pointdebasculecanada.ca, 22 décembre 2011

La Muslim Students’ Association (MSA – section Université Concordia) recommande plusieurs sites à ses supporteurs qui désirent approfondir leur compréhension de l’islam. Parmi ceux-ci le site islamweb.net en langue française rappelle les préceptes de l’islam en vertu desquels la fête de Noël est illicite:

 

Il n'est permis à aucun musulman de participer à ces fêtes de mécréants car c’est considéré comme une participation à ce qui est erroné et comme une ressemblance à ces mécréants. Il est confirmé que le Prophète (…) a affirmé dans le hadith rapporté par Abou Dawoud (…) que quiconque s'assimile à des gens devient l'un d'entre eux. Quant à l'arbre de Noël, il est connu qu'il représente l'un des rites relatifs à cette occasion chez les mécréants. Les oulémas (exégètes musulmans) ont mentionné, en raison du hadith précédent, qu'il n'est pas permis de s'assimiler à des mécréants en faisant ce qui leur est spécifique.

 

La MSA constitue l’une des principales courroies de transmission des Frères Musulmans en Amérique du Nord. L’organisation a été décrite dans un rapport de la police de New York de 2007 (p.68 – Archives PdeB) comme un «incubateur» de radicalisme.

 

Initialement, c’est la MSA de Concordia qui facilita la venue des deux prédicateurs islamistes radicaux Hamza Tzortzis et Abdur-Raheem Green sur le campus de l’Université à l’automne 2011. À l’époque, les positions des prédicateurs favorables à la lapidation, à la criminalisation de l’homosexualité, au droit du mari de battre son épouse rebelle, à l’instauration du califat, etc., étaient connues. Suite aux protestations du public, la MSA s’est retirée du projet. La conférence des deux prédicateurs fut déplacée vers une salle de la Muslim Association of Canada, une autre organisation des Frères Musulmans.

 

L’objectif poursuivi par la MSA a été clairement énoncé lors d’une conférence organisée par l’organisation en 1975:

 

 «Le but du mouvement islamique est de provoquer dans le monde l’avènement d’une nouvelle société basée complètement sur les enseignements de l’islam. Une telle société fera tout en son pouvoir pour appliquer ces principes dans son gouvernement, dans ses organisations politiques, économiques et sociales, dans ses relations avec les autres états, dans son système d’éducation, dans les valeurs morales qu’elle promeut et dans tous les autres aspects de la vie.» «Notre effort organisé et graduel devant mener à l’émergence d’une telle société constitue le processus d’islamisation.» «(…) Si notre but ultime est de constituer une communauté qui nous soit propre, alors l’embryon de cette communauté doit être mis en place au sein même de la communauté que nous désirons changer. Seulement de cette façon pourrons-nous faire face aux défis que présente la communauté à laquelle nous sommes opposés.» [The Process of Islamization (Le processus d’islamisation) – Discours présenté par Jaafar Sheikh Idris au 13e congrès de la Muslim Students’ Association (MSA) à l’Université de Toledo (Ohio)] (Traduction PdeB)

 

Les fatwas d’Ibn Qayyim et d’Ibn Taymiyya

 

Plusieurs autres fatwas interdisant aux musulmans de célébrer Noël ont été proclamées dans le passé.

 

En 2008, la mosquée Assuna (Essuna) de Montréal avait cité (en arabe) sur son site des fatwas d’Ibn Qayyim (1292-1350) et d’Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328), deux autorités de l’islam endossées par les Frères Musulmans, qui interdisent non seulement de célébrer Noël mais tout simplement de souhaiter Joyeux Noël. La mosquée Assuna était décrite en 2006 par le site Oumma.com comme la plus grande mosquée salafiste de Montréal:

 

Ibn Qayyim (Dispositions régissant les dhimmis – Ruling for Dhimmis) : «Féliciter (les chrétiens) à propos des symboles de leur religion est interdit selon l'unanimité des savants. Par exemple, leur offrir les meilleurs vœux pour leurs fêtes ou leur carême, et leur souhaiter: «Joyeuses fêtes!», etc. Si celui qui dit ceci ne tombe pas lui-même dans la mécréance, il commet au moins un interdit. C'est comme si on félicitait un non-musulman pour sa prosternation devant la croix alors que cela est le plus grand péché auprès d’Allah. C’est encore plus horrible que de le féliciter pour boire de l’alcool, de tuer un être humain ou de forniquer, etc…»

 

L’expression dhimmis utilisée par Ibn Qayyim désigne le statut de citoyens de deuxième classe des non-musulmans qui vivent dans des sociétés qui appliquent la charia.

 

Ibn Taymiyya (Iqtida Assirati Al-Mustaqim Mukhalafata Ashabi Al-djahim): «Ressembler aux mécréants à l'occasion de certaines de leurs fêtes c’est raviver le sourire dans leur cœur et les conforter dans leur fausseté. Ils peuvent ainsi saisir l’occasion pour se renforcer et mépriser les plus faibles d'entre-nous.»

 

Muhammad al-Munajid

 

Muhammad al-Munajid (1960-) est le responsable du site Islam Q&A. Il est basé en Arabie saoudite et a étudié la doctrine islamique sous la direction d’Adbulaziz Ibn Baz (Ibn Baaz) (1910-1999), l’exégète saoudien qui soutient que la terre est plate. Voici une partie de la réponse d’al-Munajid à une musulmane qui lui demandait s’il était admissible de décorer un sapin de Noël pour répondre à la demande de sa fille de onze ans:

 

L'arbre de Noël est l'un des symboles de la fête des Chrétiens et de leurs cérémonies (religieuses). Il accompagne la Noël. On dit que son usage officiel commença en Allemagne, à la Cathédrale de Strasbourg au 16e siècle en 1539.

\

Il n'est pas permis d'imiter les mécréants dans leurs pratiques cultuelles, dans leurs rituels et symboles, en vertu de la parole du Prophète (bénédiction et salut soient sur lui): «quiconque s'assimile à un peuple en fait partie.» (rapporté par Abou Daoud, 4031 et jugé authentique par al-Albani dans Irwaa al-Ghalil, 5/109).

 

Il n'est pas permis d'installer cet arbre dans la maison d'un musulman, même si ce n'est pas pour célébrer l'évènement car le seul fait de l'acquérir constitue une imitation interdite et une vénération d'un symbole religieux des mécréants.

 

Les parents doivent garder les enfants, les empêcher de commettre l'interdit et les protéger contre l'enfer. En dépit de toutes ces fatwas qui déclarent Noël illicite, l’équipe de Point de Bascule souhaite un JOYEUX NOËL à tous ses lecteurs.

LES MILITANTES ISLAMISTES OU
COMMENT LES ESCLAVES SACRALISENT LEURS CHAÎNES

Hélios d'Alexandrie

Postedeveille.ca, 19 décembre 2011

Cette chronique d'Hélios d'Alexandrie est en quelque sorte la suite logique de la précédente, intitulée Les islamistes et le sexe des femmes. Elle a pour objectif d'expliquer ce qui semble inexplicable, à savoir l'acharnement des militantes islamistes à promouvoir une idéologie religieuse qui les dévalorise et les humilie. La vérité qui dérange a été exposée par l'imam al Houeini: l'islam ne voit dans la femme que sa dimension sexuelle, on pourrait même dire sa dimension génitale. Cette image dégradante de la femme est pourtant promue par celles qui en souffrent le plus et qui pour des raisons obscures prétendent en tirer fierté.

 

Les musulmanes portent sur leurs épaules une lourde responsabilité, sans elles, sans leur participation active, sans leur consentement à embrasser à perpétuité la servitude et l’humiliation, l’islam ne pourrait pas durer longtemps.

 

Le slogan brandi par des femmes en niqab où l’on peut lire: «le voile c’est la libération de la femme» est un exemple parmi d’autres des absurdités que les militantes islamistes mettent de l’avant pour défendre l’islam et pour se donner l’illusion de contrôler leur propre destin.

 

Certaines poussent l’absurdité jusqu’à inciter leur mari à épouser d’autres femmes, histoire de montrer que le coran et Mahomet/Allah n’ont fait preuve d’aucune injustice envers la gent féminine en autorisant et en sanctifiant la polygamie. Elles approuvent pieusement le verset du coran qui s’adresse dans ces termes aux hommes: «vos femmes sont vos champs, labourez vos champs comme il vous plaira». D’autres se disent heureuses et fières quand leur mari les roue de coups, elles prétendent alors vivre pleinement leur foi islamique.

 

Les militantes de l’islam ne s’insurgent pas contre l’inégalité de statut qui fait d’elles des êtres inférieurs et dépendants. Leur témoignage et leur héritage qui valent la moitié de ceux de l’homme ne suscitent pas chez elles de sentiments d’injustice. Elles s’émerveillent de la sagesse et de la douceur de Mahomet qui a dit: «les femmes sont déficientes en termes de raison et de foi, et la prière de l’homme musulman est non valide s’il sort des latrines ou s’il touche une femme». Elles ne se rebiffent pas quand elles écoutent religieusement l’imam citer à la télé le fameux hadith où Mahomet dit: «S’il m’était permis d’ordonner aux croyants de se prosterner à d’autres qu’à Allah, je donnerais l’ordre aux femmes de se prosterner devant leur mari». Non plus quand un autre recommande vivement aux maris de placer le fouet ou le bâton bien en vue dans le domicile pour qu’il serve d’avertissement aux épouses récalcitrantes.

 

Les militantes de l’islam ce sont aussi les mères qui jubilent en apprenant qu’un de leurs fils a commis un attentat suicide; et si en explosant il a emporté avec lui plusieurs infidèles (les infidèles par nature ne peuvent être innocents), sa joie n’a pas de limite et elle se mérite les félicitations des voisins et la reconnaissance des autorités. À aucun moment elle ne se laisse aller au chagrin, par attachement à l’islam elle rejette les sentiments de peine et d’horreur.

 

Les militantes islamistes ne désespèrent pas quand elles lisent les passages des hadiths et du coran qui traitent du paradis et de l’enfer. Le paradis compte une foule de houris à la virginité éternelle, mises à la disposition des hommes morts dans la voie d’Allah. Le coran pousse la délicatesse et le raffinement jusqu’à rendre disponibles des éphèbes immortels pour ceux qui durant leur vie appréciaient les jeunes garçons.

 

Pour les femmes il n’y a strictement rien, ou du moins le coran ne fait pas mention de récompense particulière. D’autre part il y a un passage coranique et un autre dans les hadiths qui affirment que l’enfer sera peuplé par les mécréants et par les femmes; interrogé sur le sujet par des croyantes, Mahomet a dit que les femmes iront en très grand nombre en enfer parce qu’elles désobéissent à leur mari!

 

Et serait-on étonné d’apprendre que les militantes de l’islam se placent à l’avant-garde de la lutte contre le féminisme dans les pays islamiques? Elles affirment à qui veut les entendre que Mahomet a libéré la femme pour de bon et qu’il lui a donné la protection de la meilleure des religions, ou plutôt de la seule religion véritable aux yeux d’Allah. Le féminisme c’est l’esclavage importé des kouffars, c’est la femme livrée en public et sans voile aux regards et aux désirs des hommes, c’est la liberté sexuelle qui fait d’elle une putain non payée.

 

Pour se convaincre d’être dans la bonne voie les militantes islamistes font du recrutement, elles s’activent à convaincre les non-voilées de porter le voile en y allant par la douceur au début et quand cela s'avère nécessaire, par la contrainte et le harcèlement. Elles s’adonnent au prosélytisme militant, dans l’entourage immédiat, à l’école, à l’université et sur les lieux de travail. En Occident elles se chargent de semer la confusion et susciter la controverse chez les infidèles, elles sollicitent et obtiennent l’appui de la gauche et celle des féministes tout en multipliant les provocations. Les unités de choc, celles qui se chargent de monter à l’assaut des valeurs et des traditions occidentales, ce sont elles, tandis que les hommes attendent patiemment l’affaiblissement des défenses pour achever l’adversaire.

 

Il y a une question qui jusqu’à présent n’a pas obtenu de réponse satisfaisante: Pourquoi ces femmes se donnent autant de mal pour assurer la victoire d’une idéologie qui les dénigre, les déshumanise et les humilie? Quels bénéfices trouvent-elles à combattre pour assurer le triomphe de leur pire ennemi? Les raisons sont principalement sociologiques et psychologiques. Elles se résument en deux éléments: la loyauté à la tribu et le déni de soi.

 

La loyauté à la tribu

 

L’islam est une religion tribale, l’oumma islamique est une gigantesque tribu qui impose à ses membres une loyauté sans faille et qui rend tabou la dissidence. La pression du groupe s’avère irrésistible pour la grande majorité des musulmans et la tribu impose des limites strictes à l’individualité. Celui qui sort des rangs est rejeté, il n’a plus le droit d’exister et encore moins de préserver des liens avec les autres membres de la tribu, même s’il s’agit de proches parents. La peine de mort prononcée contre les apostats n’est que la consécration de ce rejet. Le musulman et la musulmane doivent démontrer leur loyauté pour éviter le rejet, avec la montée de l’islamisme il ne leur suffit plus de se dire musulmans et attachés à l’islam, ils doivent montrer patte blanche en priant, en mangeant halal, en observant scrupuleusement les obligations et les interdits et, pour la femme, en arborant le voile.

 

Le caractère religieux de la tribu impose la loyauté religieuse, mais pour être reconnu et obtenir sa place au soleil il importe de faire preuve de zèle, cela impose d’aller plus loin que la démonstration de loyauté. Les hommes, et à plus forte raison les femmes, doivent par conséquent militer en faveur de l’islam qui oppresse les hommes et qui écrase les femmes. Hommes et femmes se trouvent ainsi à lutter pour maintenir, voire rendre irréversible leur propre asservissement.

 

Le déni de soi

 

Pour demeurer dans la tribu et pour y être reconnues, les femmes doivent par conséquent se renier sans état d’âme, elles doivent se sentir fières de la servitude et de l’humiliation qui sont leur lot. Cette fierté qui va jusqu’à l’arrogance et jusqu’au défi n’est que la contrepartie de la servitude, son cliché négatif en quelque sorte. Le suprématisme islamique tire son origine de l’humiliation que les musulmans refusent d’admettre et qui est consubstantielle à l’islam. Contrairement aux chrétiens ils n’entretiennent pas de relation de filiation avec Allah mais se disent (fièrement) être les esclaves d’Allah.

 

Or dans l’islam l’humiliation de la femme est décuplée, le coran et les hadiths lui renvoient une image d’elle-même extrêmement négative, de plus elle doit accepter et subir l’inégalité de statut que lui impose sa religion et par le fait même la tribu. Pour survivre, pour ne pas être rejetée et pour être reconnue par les membres de la tribu elle assume entièrement sa condition en se reniant elle-même. Elle devient l’esclave qui arbore fièrement ses chaînes, qui en fait une source d’orgueil et qui attaque sans merci tous ceux qui prétendent vouloir la libérer.

PAS DE MUSIQUE À L'ÉCOLE
Jean-Marc Gilbert

fr.canoe.ca, 19 décembre 2011

 Il n'y a pas d'âge pour les accommodements raisonnables. La direction d'une école du quartier Saint- Michel accorde un passe-droit particulier à une jeune musulmane de maternelle: on lui permet de placer des écouteurs anti-bruit sur ses oreilles parce que sa religion lui interdit d'écouter de la musique.

 

Cette demande faite par les parents de la jeune élève, dès le début de l'année scolaire, ne manque pas de soulever des questionnements du côté du personnel de l'établissement multiethnique de la métropole.

 

Certains membres du personnel craignent qu'elle puisse devenir la risée de ses compagnons de classe, voire même une victime de la méchanceté des enfants. Une employée, qui souhaite conserver l'anonymat, explique que ces «demandes particulières» sont de plus en plus fréquentes. «Nous avons souvent des problèmes avec certaines communautés religieuses. Par les années passées, nous avions beaucoup de demandes similaires, particulièrement dans le temps de Noël ou de Pâques», affirme-t-elle. (…)

 

Pas un cas isolé

 

Du côté de l'Alliance des professeurs de Montréal (APM), on souligne que ce genre de demandes sont de plus en plus fréquentes et qu'elles ne viennent pas nécessairement des gens de confession musulmane. C'est pourquoi l'APM souhaite que l'école devienne un lieu commun pour tous et où la pratique religieuse n'a pas sa place.

 

C'est notamment pour cette raison que la Fédération autonome de l'enseignement, de laquelle l'APM fait partie, a entrepris des consultations auprès de ses membres, partout en province, au sujet de la laïcité dans les écoles. «Certains professeurs accordent beaucoup d'accommodements pour faciliter une entrée progressive», remarque Élaine Bertrand, vice-président de l'APM et responsable du secteur préscolaire. (…)

QUÉBEC ACCEPTE QUE LES AGENTES DES SERVICES CORRECTIONNELS PORTENT LE HIJAB
Dépêche

Radio-canada.ca, 20 décembre 2011

 Les agentes des Services correctionnels pourront désormais porter le hijab, soit le foulard islamique qui recouvre la tête, mais qui ne cache pas le visage, et celui-ci leur sera fourni par l'employeur lui-même. Cette décision émane d'une entente à l'amiable intervenue entre le ministère de la Sécurité publique du Québec et la Commission des droits de la personne à la suite du dépôt d'une plainte pour discrimination déposée en 2007 par une Montréalaise musulmane.

 

La Commission a jugé, après enquête, que le règlement sur le port de l'uniforme des agents de services correctionnels avait un effet discriminatoire et le ministère a préféré conclure cette entente à l'amiable plutôt que d'amener l'affaire devant le Tribunal des droits de la personne. La décision a cependant fait bondir le Parti québécois.

 

«C'est une dérive totale», a lancé en réaction la porte-parole de l'opposition péquiste en matière de laïcité, Carole Poirier. «Est-ce que la Sécurité publique va faire faire des hijab avec le logo du Québec dessus? C'est complètement fou. Pour des motifs religieux, on va permettre ce genre de vêtement, s'est-elle indignée. Ça n'a pas de bon sens. Après ça, c'est le niqab [voile facial] et après ça c'est la burqa [voile intégral]?»

 

Mme Poirier a rappelé que la commission Bouchard-Taylor avait notamment recommandé que les juges, les agents de police et ceux des services correctionnels, entre autres, ne portent aucun signe religieux ou politique, afin d'assurer une image de neutralité complète.

 

L'Assemblée nationale se penche toujours sur le projet de loi 94 présenté au printemps 2010 par la ministre de la Justice de l'époque, Kathleen Weil, qui prévoit que la prestation de service de tous les employés de l'État doive se faire à visage découvert.

 

La neutralité religieuse y est d'ailleurs clairement évoquée au chapitre 2 du projet de loi 94, qui se lit ainsi: «Tout accommodement doit respecter la Charte des droits et libertés de la personne, notamment le droit à l'égalité entre les femmes et les hommes et le principe de la neutralité religieuse de l'État selon lequel l'État ne favorise ni ne défavorise une religion ou une croyance particulière.»

 

La députée d'Hochelaga-Maisonneuve estime que la décision du ministère de la Sécurité publique démontre que le gouvernement Charest a complètement abdiqué sur la question, incluant les principes qu'il a proposés dans le projet de loi qui dort au feuilleton depuis près de deux ans. «Des agents correctionnels, ce sont des agents de l'État et ça devrait être neutre. Ils ne devraient pas porter de signes distinctifs, ni de signes politiques ni de signes religieux», a dit Mme Poirier.

 

Au bureau de la ministre Weil, qui pilote toujours le projet de loi 94 à partir de son portefeuille de l'Immigration et des Communautés culturelles, on s'inscrit en faux contre cette interprétation de la «neutralité religieuse». «Pour recevoir ou donner des services, il faut être à visage découvert, a d'abord expliqué la porte-parole de Mme Weil, Marie-Ève Labranche. Le projet de loi vient vraiment tracer une ligne entre ce qui est raisonnable ou non.»

 

Selon Mme Labranche, dans cette optique, la question de neutralité ne relève pas des signes affichés, mais bien des gestes posés. «On ne peut pas empêcher quelqu'un de porter un signe religieux. Ce serait contre nos deux chartes et contre notre histoire. Le fait de porter un signe religieux relève de la liberté d'expression, de la liberté de religion, en autant qu'il n'y ait pas de transmission de valeurs religieuses ou de prosélytisme», a-t-elle précisé.

 

Mais selon la porte-parole péquiste, la politique de «laïcité ouverte» prônée par le gouvernement Charest, qui implique des décisions au cas par cas, équivaut à remettre tout le pouvoir décisionnel entre les mains de la Commission des droits de la personne et de la jeunesse. Du côté de la Coalition avenir Québec (CAQ), son directeur des communications, Jean-François Del Torchio, s'est contenté de ce bref commentaire: «Les personnes en fonction d'autorité ne devraient pas porter de symboles religieux».

 

L'Action démocratique du Québec, dont l'absorption par la CAQ reste à être confirmée par ses membres, avait pourtant été jusque-là très active dans le dossier des accommodements raisonnables, faisant connaître son désaccord complet avec le port de signes religieux par les employés de l'État.

 

Quant au ministère de la Sécurité publique, qui a conclu l'entente permettant le port du voile islamique au sein des Services correctionnels, la porte-parole Valérie Savard a indiqué que l'aspect de la sécurité, qui avait été invoqué dans le passé pour refuser le port du hijab, avait été résolu. «Le foulard est muni d'un velcro. Aussitôt que quelqu'un tire sur le foulard, il se défait. Il respecte donc toutes les normes sécuritaires», a-t-elle expliqué.

ISRAËL-SYRIE: DEUX POIDS DEUX MESURES À L'ONU
Jonathan Serrero
Guysen.com, 22 décembre 2011

 La Syrie et Israël, deux situations diamétralement opposées. Pourtant le Conseil de sécurité montre plus d’entrain à voter des résolutions contre les constructions israéliennes en Judée-Samarie ou à Jérusalem que de condamner sévèrement les 5000 victimes du régime de Bachar El Assad. L’ambassadeur d’Israël à l’ONU, Ron Prossor, a dénoncé ce deux poids deux mesures.

 

Manifestations, morts, blessés, anarchie. La Syrie s’enfonce un peu plus chaque jour dans l’horreur. Bachar El Assad et son régime auraient procédé à l’élimination de 5000 personnes depuis le début du conflit. Au contraire de la Libye, le monde se refuse d’intervenir militairement et peine à s’accorder sur le vote d’une résolution qui contraindrait le président syrien à quitter le pouvoir.

 

Pendant ce temps à Jérusalem, des pierres, des pelleteuses, des logements, des constructions et des condamnations unanimes de la communauté internationale. L’ONU et son Conseil de sécurité s’empressent alors de voter une nouvelle résolution condamnant les constructions israéliennes dans sa capitale et au-delà de la Ligne Verte.

 

L’ambassadeur d'Israël à l'ONU, Ron Prossor, a dénoncé les condamnations émises par le Conseil de sécurité contre les constructions israéliennes en Judée-Samarie. Dans sa déclaration, le représentant israélien aux Nations Unies déplore le silence du Conseil de sécurité sur la répression violente en Syrie, le terrorisme à Gaza, ou le nucléaire iranien. Un deux poids deux mesures dont l'État juif fait constamment les frais à l'ONU.

 

Au final, seul les pays arabes semblent prendre la situation syrienne au sérieux et relèguent la question du conflit israélo-palestinien au second plan. Des sanctions importantes ont été votées contre le régime du leader de Damas qui s’est vu, entre autre, interdit de siéger au sein de l’Assemblée de la Ligue arabe.

 

La Turquie aussi mène le front de la rébellion contre la Syrie. Le ministre des Affaires étrangères d’Ankara évoque en coulisse l’option militaire pour chasser Bachar El Assad du pouvoir mais comme la Ligue arabe, la Turquie attend de connaitre les véritables positions de l’Occident sur ce dossier sensible.

L’UNESCO SUBVENTIONNE UN REVUE PALESTINIENNE
POUR ENFANTS QUI GLORIFIE HITLER

David Ouellette

davidouellette.net, 22 décembre 2011

L’UNESCO, l’organisation qui vient d’intégrer «l’État de la Palestine» dans ses rangs, subventionne une revue palestinienne qui fait l’éloge du génocide des Juifs.

 

Zayzafuna, une revue pour enfants qui prétend faire la promotion de la démocratie et de la tolérance, a publié un article d’une Palestinienne âgée de 10 ans où elle raconte avoir parlé avec Adolf Hitler dans ses rêves. Selon la traduction de Palestinian Media Watch, un observatoire indépendant des médias palestiniens, la jeune Palestinienne demande au leader nazi: «Tu es celui qui a tué les Juifs?» Ce à quoi lui répond l’auteur de Mein Kampf: «Oui, je les ai tués pour que tu saches qu’ils sont une nation qui sème la destruction partout dans le monde».

 

Sans surprise, la subvention de l’UNESCO ne semble pas en péril. En réponse à une plainte déposée par le Centre Simon Wiesenthal, le bureau du directeur général de l’UNESCO a répondu: «Permettez-moi de souligner que l’UNESCO prend cette question très au sérieux et qu’elle ne peut que déplorer et condamner ces propos (…) Nous allons porter cette question à l’attention des autorités palestiniennes concernées».

 

Pour manifester son opposition à la reconnaissance de «l’État de la Palestine» par l’UNESCO, le Canada a annoncé qu’il ne bonifierait pas sa contribution actuelle pour compenser l’augmentation des dépenses encourues par l’adhésion de la Palestine à l’organisme.